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Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 143
ld have walked for two hundred yards down that ditch on dead rebels without touching, the ground. Of course Colonel Wilder doesn't claim that his brigade defeated Longstreet. His statement refers only to that portion of the corps which entered the field in his front. He thinks that not less than two thousand rebels were killed and wounded in this field. It was probably the most disastrous fire of the two days fight on either side. On Sunday, Colonel Edward A. King, of the Sixtyeighth Indiana, then commanding a brigade, was killed by a rebel sharp-shooter concealed in a tree. The shot struck him, in the forehead, killing him instantly. Colonel Grose, reported killed, was not hurt. In a skirmish of Wilder's brigade with Forrest, a few miles from Dalton. Georgia, three days before the battle, Forrest was so badly wounded that he was unable to take his command during the battle. General Joe Johnston accompanied Forrest's brigade, and narrowly escaped being captured. The sam
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 143
olonel Wilder doesn't claim that his brigade defeated Longstreet. His statement refers only to that portion of the corps which entered the field in his front. He thinks that not less than two thousand rebels were killed and wounded in this field. It was probably the most disastrous fire of the two days fight on either side. On Sunday, Colonel Edward A. King, of the Sixtyeighth Indiana, then commanding a brigade, was killed by a rebel sharp-shooter concealed in a tree. The shot struck him, in the forehead, killing him instantly. Colonel Grose, reported killed, was not hurt. In a skirmish of Wilder's brigade with Forrest, a few miles from Dalton. Georgia, three days before the battle, Forrest was so badly wounded that he was unable to take his command during the battle. General Joe Johnston accompanied Forrest's brigade, and narrowly escaped being captured. The same day Lee, Johnston, Bragg, and other rebel generals, were in Dalton in consultation.--Indianapolis Journal.
Hornady (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 143
red. When the courier reached him he was moving toward Chattanooga, at what point or with what strength it would probably be improper to state, but we may state that by this time he is past all danger of being intercepted by the rebels, and has force enough to make good all Rosecrans has lost, and something over. At Stevenson Wilder heard a rumor that Grierson's cavalry from the Mississippi were within ten miles, and that Sherman's whole corps was within two days march, coming up from Decatur, Alabama, but the rumors were undoubtedly false, as Grierson was in Springfield, Illinois, on Friday, and Sherman could not have got to the point stated, from the Big Black, in the time that has elapsed since the battle, and we know that he had not started before. Among the incidents of the battle of Saturday, Colonel Wilder described the frightful slaughter of Longstreet's men at the time they were driven back by our left wing. This celebrated corps, as desperate soldiers as ever lived, att
Missionary Ridge (United States) (search for this): chapter 143
of some movement in the centre to strike there. They massed a column six or eight deep against our thin line and broke through it, scattering the divisions more by main strength and pressure than by their fire, into the hills and hollows of Mission Ridge behind them, where the nature of the ground made it difficult to keep them together or rally them. This was the only real reverse of the day. It embraced but two divisions, as already stated, and of these, Sheridan and Davis, who, Wilder sayty or thirty miles has added a gloomy shade even to the most cheering aspect of the fight; but the distance was small, our extreme right, which was farthest away on Sunday, being less than twelve miles off, and the left, after falling back to Mission Ridge, being hardly more than half of it. On Monday, immediately after the return from the field, Wilder was sent off up the Tennessee to guard fords and passes for Burnside's benefit, and took with him despatches from Rosecrans with full news o
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 143
On Sunday night Wilder distributed his brigade so as to protect the roads from the right to Chattanooga, and on Monday joined the main body in good order and good spirits, entirely unconscious of a let him. They fought to break him up before he could get back to the impregnable position at Chattanooga, and only succeeded in breaking up two divisions. As Wilder came in he gathered up and brought with him a very large amount of stores and material, supposed by those in Chattanooga, and of course by the Herald writer, to have been lost. Among these were two guns, one hundred ambulances, sihousand five hundred and thirty with him to Stevenson. The distance of the battle-field from Chattanooga has not been fully understood, and the supposition that Rosecrans was driven back twenty or tat Burnside will not be caught unprepared. When the courier reached him he was moving toward Chattanooga, at what point or with what strength it would probably be improper to state, but we may state
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 143
g a brigade, was killed by a rebel sharp-shooter concealed in a tree. The shot struck him, in the forehead, killing him instantly. Colonel Grose, reported killed, was not hurt. In a skirmish of Wilder's brigade with Forrest, a few miles from Dalton. Georgia, three days before the battle, Forrest was so badly wounded that he was unable to take his command during the battle. General Joe Johnston accompanied Forrest's brigade, and narrowly escaped being captured. The same day Lee, Johnston,, in the forehead, killing him instantly. Colonel Grose, reported killed, was not hurt. In a skirmish of Wilder's brigade with Forrest, a few miles from Dalton. Georgia, three days before the battle, Forrest was so badly wounded that he was unable to take his command during the battle. General Joe Johnston accompanied Forrest's brigade, and narrowly escaped being captured. The same day Lee, Johnston, Bragg, and other rebel generals, were in Dalton in consultation.--Indianapolis Journal.
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 143
int or with what strength it would probably be improper to state, but we may state that by this time he is past all danger of being intercepted by the rebels, and has force enough to make good all Rosecrans has lost, and something over. At Stevenson Wilder heard a rumor that Grierson's cavalry from the Mississippi were within ten miles, and that Sherman's whole corps was within two days march, coming up from Decatur, Alabama, but the rumors were undoubtedly false, as Grierson was in Springfield, Illinois, on Friday, and Sherman could not have got to the point stated, from the Big Black, in the time that has elapsed since the battle, and we know that he had not started before. Among the incidents of the battle of Saturday, Colonel Wilder described the frightful slaughter of Longstreet's men at the time they were driven back by our left wing. This celebrated corps, as desperate soldiers as ever lived, attacking two divisions, Van Cleve's and Davis's, to the right, and a little in f
W. T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 143
is past all danger of being intercepted by the rebels, and has force enough to make good all Rosecrans has lost, and something over. At Stevenson Wilder heard a rumor that Grierson's cavalry from the Mississippi were within ten miles, and that Sherman's whole corps was within two days march, coming up from Decatur, Alabama, but the rumors were undoubtedly false, as Grierson was in Springfield, Illinois, on Friday, and Sherman could not have got to the point stated, from the Big Black, in the Sherman could not have got to the point stated, from the Big Black, in the time that has elapsed since the battle, and we know that he had not started before. Among the incidents of the battle of Saturday, Colonel Wilder described the frightful slaughter of Longstreet's men at the time they were driven back by our left wing. This celebrated corps, as desperate soldiers as ever lived, attacking two divisions, Van Cleve's and Davis's, to the right, and a little in front of Wilder, separated them and pushed on through the open space yelping — the rebel shout is a yel
t have got to the point stated, from the Big Black, in the time that has elapsed since the battle, and we know that he had not started before. Among the incidents of the battle of Saturday, Colonel Wilder described the frightful slaughter of Longstreet's men at the time they were driven back by our left wing. This celebrated corps, as desperate soldiers as ever lived, attacking two divisions, Van Cleve's and Davis's, to the right, and a little in front of Wilder, separated them and pushed onwas crushed into a disorderly mob, and driven off. When the firing ceased one could have walked for two hundred yards down that ditch on dead rebels without touching, the ground. Of course Colonel Wilder doesn't claim that his brigade defeated Longstreet. His statement refers only to that portion of the corps which entered the field in his front. He thinks that not less than two thousand rebels were killed and wounded in this field. It was probably the most disastrous fire of the two days fi
one hundred ambulances, sixty beef cattle, and a large number of ammunition wagons and caissons. Similar recoveries were doubtless made by other portions of the army, but the correspondent had hurried off .to publish his description of the fight, and knew nothing of this rather important variation of the state of facts behind him. Our loss in prisoners, in both days, the Colonel says, will not exceed two thousand five hundred, including the wounded. In artillery, it will be less than Colonel Barnett supposed, as guns were recovered and brought in, of which he could know nothing when he gave his estimate to the correspondent. We captured about two thousand prisoners, of whom Wilder brought one thousand five hundred and thirty with him to Stevenson. The distance of the battle-field from Chattanooga has not been fully understood, and the supposition that Rosecrans was driven back twenty or thirty miles has added a gloomy shade even to the most cheering aspect of the fight; but the d
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