hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George B. McClellan 1,246 6 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 888 4 Browse Search
James Longstreet 773 5 Browse Search
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) 446 10 Browse Search
Irvin McDowell 422 4 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 410 4 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 376 6 Browse Search
John Pope 355 5 Browse Search
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) 349 1 Browse Search
Fitz John Porter 346 18 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. Search the whole document.

Found 290 total hits in 80 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.14
republic to take the field on the same day, that is, on the 22d of February, in honor of Washington's birthday! In the West, where the rivers The North front of the War Department, Washington. From a War-time photograph. were open, everything was in readiness. Moreover, the order of the President was not necessary to warrant Grant, already under orders from McClellan, in beginning the campaign, and Grant anticipated that order. His debut was as a lightning-stroke. His victory at Fort Donelson, followed by the capitulation of 15,000 Confederates, was the return for Bull Run. The impression created throughout the whole army was profound. The Federal volunteers took heart again. The confidence of the Army of the Potomac was redoubled. The general was now restored to health. The weather had moderated. The time had at last come for this army to act. . . . But the immense flotilla which should transport it to Urbana, near the mouth of the Rappahannock [see map, p. 164], or to
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 4.14
patriotically dissimulated his opinion with extraordinary finesse; he permitted the excitement to spend itself, and, thanks to the slowness of communication with England, gained time enough Seward's letter consenting to the return of the Commissioners bears date of Dee. 2 6, 18 61.--Editors. to extricate his Government at the cing the decision he had succeeded in extorting from the powers that be in a specious web of plausibilities, calculated to sweeten the bitterness caused at home by England's exactions, and at the same time to satisfy her just demands. He succeeded in sparing his country and the world the horrors of a war the results of which could d. . . . It was not for McClellan to implicate himself in questions of a purely political character, but he probably foresaw the consequences of a war in which England, mistress of the seas, would have inundated the Southern States with arms and munitions of war, with money and volunteers, blockading the Federal ports, and in th
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.14
or of Washington's birthday! In the West, where the rivers The North front of the War Department, Washington. From a War-time photograph. were open, everything was in readiness. Moreover, the order of the President was not necessary to warrant Grant, already under orders from McClellan, in beginning the campaign, and Grant anticipated that order. His debut was as a lightning-stroke. His victory at Fort Donelson, followed by the capitulation of 15,000 Confederates, was the return for Bull Run. The impression created throughout the whole army was profound. The Federal volunteers took heart again. The confidence of the Army of the Potomac was redoubled. The general was now restored to health. The weather had moderated. The time had at last come for this army to act. . . . But the immense flotilla which should transport it to Urbana, near the mouth of the Rappahannock [see map, p. 164], or to Fort Monroe, another point of debarkation equally considered with the other, was not
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.14
f all the armies of the Union, he was not only surrounded by the aureole of his splendid victories and incontestable military authority, and not only had a cruel experience proved to the people the necessity for concentrating the military power in the hands of one man, but the different armies which he controlled were confided to approved chiefs whom he could trust with perfect liberty of action, while, in case of need, he might leave at the head of the Army of the Potomac the conqueror of Gettysburg. In Washington, Halleck presided as chief of staff, reduced by Grant to a subordinate function, it is true, but a function for which he possessed special aptitude. The situation of McClellan was different. He perceived this on the day when, entering on the campaign, he placed himself at the head of the Army of the Potomac. At first he was equal to the emergency by dint of incessant work; but he was obliged to renounce the daily routine which had served to maintain his relations with al
Leesburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.14
seemed to have come. The rigors of winter in Virginia hardly make themselves felt before the beginning of December. By the 17th of October the enemy had again retreated. The Army of the Potomac replied with a commensurate advance. But this was a faux pas. The blunder was consummated at Ball's Bluff [see p. 122]. McClellan's orders had been given in entire ignorance of the topography of the environs of Edwards's Ferry (all the maps being inexact) and of the force of the enemy in front of Leesburg. In fact, at that time the organization of the secret service was entirely insufficient to the occasion, in spite of the praiseworthy efforts of Mr. Allen Pinkerton. Usually mentioned in the Official Records under the assumed name of E. J. Allen.--Editors. McClellan, who was established beyond Dranesville with McCall's division, believed himself to be within supporting distance of Baker's brigade. The latter was crushed on the 21st, before any one on the right bank of the Potomac knew
Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.14
Stanton. From a photograph. Mr. Seward, having courageously ended the Trent affair to the satisfaction of the public, now recovered from its first attack of folly, the only obstacle to be feared — the danger of a maritime war — was finally removed. Burnside embarked at New York, during the early days of 1862, with the little army that should seize Roanoke and march on the interior of North Carolina [see Vol. I., p. 632]. The troops destined for the attack on New Orleans were sent to Ship Island in detail. But an unusually severe winter followed. While the naval expeditions intended to land troops on the coasts of the Southern States might still have been fitted out, though the severe gales of the season would have subjected them to serious danger, deep snows and intense cold made movements on the part of the Army of the Potomac next to impossible. Even had it been desirable to expose raw troops to the rigors of a winter campaign, it would have been impracticable to provision
Quaker (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.14
addle, he was equally indefatigable with the pen. Possessed of a methodical and exact mind, he comprehended the organization of his army in every minute detail. The creation of all the material of war necessary to its existence and action was extraordinary proof of the wonderful readiness of the Americans in an emergency. . . But the season advanced. The army was being formed. At the end of September the enemy had fallen back on Fairfax Court House, leaving to us at Munson's Hill a few Quaker guns of logs and pasteboard. The time for action seemed to have come. The rigors of winter in Virginia hardly make themselves felt before the beginning of December. By the 17th of October the enemy had again retreated. The Army of the Potomac replied with a commensurate advance. But this was a faux pas. The blunder was consummated at Ball's Bluff [see p. 122]. McClellan's orders had been given in entire ignorance of the topography of the environs of Edwards's Ferry (all the maps being i
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.14
he general was now restored to health. The weather had moderated. The time had at last come for this army to act. . . . But the immense flotilla which should transport it to Urbana, near the mouth of the Rappahannock [see map, p. 164], or to Fort Monroe, another point of debarkation equally considered with the other, was not yet ready, and no one more than McClellan regretted the delay. It is well known that he was obliged to fight many objections in order to secure the adoption of his favor same time placing it on the Urbana route, thus making a landing there impossible for us, and permitting Lee to anticipate McClellan on the Virginia peninsula. McClellan would not give up his plan of approaching Richmond from the south-east. Fort Monroe, occupied by the Federals, was chosen as the new point of debarkation, and the pursuit of the enemy on the road from Manassas to Fredericksburg had no other object than to deceive him as to the intentions of the Federals. The army, after havi
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.14
y to Stanton's nomination by recommending him earnestly to the President. But he was not slow to regret this. Mr. Stanton, endowed with a remarkable faculty for work, rendered incontestable service in the organization of the armies; but, fearing the growing importance of those who commanded them, and wishing to impose his authority, he was instrumental, more than any one else, in developing in Mr. Lincoln's mind the idea of directing military operations in person, from the depths of the White House itself. The personal intervention of the President, provoked by the inconsiderate impatience of the public and the precipitate solicitations of McClellan's political adversaries, first declared itself in a singular order, kept a secret as regards the public at the time, but given to the press on March 11th. This order [ President's General War order no. 1 ], dated the 27th of January, directed all the armies of the republic to take the field on the same day, that is, on the 22d of Febru
Claremont, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.14
ere as regarded material, well prepared for the offensive than those of the East, and as it seemed requisite that they should act together, it may be inferred that frome the first days of his assuming command, the scheme of postponing Mt. Olivet Church on the old Fairfax road — picket post of the 40th New York Volunteers. From a sketch made in Sept., 1861. till spring the operations of the Army of the Potomac was explicitly determined on. McClellan wisely concealed from every one this Claremont, the residence of Commodore French Forrest, C. S. N.--picket post of the 14th New York Volunteers. From a sketch made Sept. 26, 1861. resolution, the objections to which he understood better than any one. But his soldiers were not slow to comprehend; often the crowd has sagacious instincts, and may divine the calculations of even the most wary statesman. The army proved it in this case by constructing, with all the ready skill of American backwoodsmen, log-huts to protect them from the
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...