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Mount Jackson (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
s infantry, he sent his cavalry forward, following the enemy to Mount Jackson, where, having crossed the Shenandoah, he had disappeared. Genion, and that he had driven this force beyond the Shenandoah at Mount Jackson. General Banks, now satisfied that Jackson had abandoned ther's Hill, the enemy continuing his retreat toward Woodstock and Mount Jackson. Our army remained in camp at Strasburg and Fisher's Hill, awaaggage, to Woodstock, the enemy having continued his retreat to Mount Jackson. Receiving additional supplies, we moved forward from Woodstocishing with the enemy daily. On the 15th our army arrived near Mount Jackson, finding the enemy in force, and after a brisk engagement compe him to fall back and his main force to cross the Shenandoah at Mount Jackson, beyond which he took position at Rude's Hill, covering the vilhe impassable river. On the 7th, Fremont forced the enemy from Mount Jackson, and pursued him to New Market and Harrisonburg, but failed to
Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
ng of the 10th, after a terrible night's march, we reached Conrad's store, some six miles below the field of action, where I met our worn and defeated comrades of Tyler's and Carroll's commands; and here I formed a new line, and in position awaited the expected attack from Jackson, and the arrival of Ferry's brigade. Ferry came with our supports, but Jackson, having been severely handled by a small detachment, although he had defeated it, was satisfied, now that he was free from Fremont, not to try conclusions with the division, united, that had defeated him at Kernstown. In the afternoon General Fremont succeeded in communicating with General Shields, and arranging for the crossing of his army. It was the intention, thus united, to follow Jackson, now retreating toward Gordonsville to join Lee's army near Richmond, but before the morning of the 11th Shields received peremptory orders, directing him to return with his command to Front Royal, where we arrived on the 16th of June.
Newtown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
apture by occupying Winchester, and by this movement intercepting supplies or reenforcements, and cutting off all possibility of retreat. . . . It was determined, therefore, to enter the lists with: the enemy in a race or a battle, as he should choose, for the possession of Winchester, the key of the valley, and for us the position of safety. Jackson pushed his advance rapidly from Front Royal to Middletown, and on the 24th intercepted Banks's column, meeting, however, with repulse. At Newtown another Confederate force was met and driven off by Banks; his rear-guard also repulsed an attack near Kernstown. At Winchester, another stand was made on the 25th. General Banks says: I determined to test the substance and strength of the enemy by actual collision, and measures were promptly taken to prepare our troops to meet them. The Confederates were held in check several hours, and that night Banks's retreat was continued toward Martinsburg. See p. 288.--Editors. With the informa
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
, and Jackson's army held in cheek beyond the Shenandoah by Banks and Shields. General McDowell, with his army, held Fredericksburg and the line of the Rappahannock, General Fremont moving toward Staunton from the west, and General McClellan, with tgement of our armies in Virginia was made. The order directing Shields's division to join General McDowell's army at Fredericksburg was most unfortunate. The divisions were indignant in contemplation of the results, knowing the situation as they didown the valley to Strasburg, thus opening the way for Jackson [see map, p. 284]. With Shields's division far away at Fredericksburg, Colonel Franklin Sawyer, in his history of the 8th Ohio, of Kimball's brigade, records the following incident, which took place at Falmouth, opposite Fredericksburg: Kimball's brigade was ordered into a newly fenced field for its camp, and no sooner were the men dismissed from ranks than the entire fence disappeared. General King, who was in command at th
New Market (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
pleted, and the enemy, forced from his position, retreated beyond New Market toward Harrisonburg and Port Republic, and our forces encamped in positions in advance of New Market. In this engagement our forces captured one company of cavalry, and inflicted other heavy losses upon tion held the roads to Luray, the crossings of the Shenandoah, and New Market. General Banks, in General orders, no. 20, dated New Market, VirgNew Market, Virginia, April 21st, 1862, congratulated Battle-field of Kernstown, Va., September, 1885. On this side of the stone-wall Jackson formed his of Winchester, now arrived, and in General orders, no. 28, dated New Market, April 30th, 1862, relieving me from command of the division, sairategic ability. On the 12th of May General Shields moved from New Market for Falmouth, and General Banks moved down the valley to Strasbur, Fremont forced the enemy from Mount Jackson, and pursued him to New Market and Harrisonburg, but failed to bring him to battle. On the 8t
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
on the Great Cacapon River. The division began the movement under this order on the 5th, and on the 7th, while we were on the way, General Shields arrived from Washington and assumed command. General Banks had already crossed the Potomac with his divisions, and with but little opposition had occupied Harper's Ferry, Charlestow Winchester (excepting Shields's division) east of the Blue Ridge. On the morning of the 22d, the last of his troops having moved, General Banks departed for Washington, leaving the division of Shields, the only force at and around Winchester, as the guardians of the valley. The enemy meantime had not been idle, having been ken from the west, and General McClellan, with the Army of the Potomac, was advancing up the peninsula, confronting the Confederate army under Johnston. Thus was Washington protected, and the ruin of the Confederacy imminent, when a blunder in the management of our armies in Virginia was made. The order directing Shields's divisio
Fishers Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
7th, a force of the enemy with cavalry and artillery was met at Fisher's Hill, near Strasburg, where brisk skirmishing was commenced and contuit, and, returning, encamped again on the night of the 18th at Fisher's Hill and Strasburg. On the morning of the 19th, waiting until the aere moving. I hoped thus to head him off before he could reach Fisher's Hill beyond Strasburg. Major-General Banks, arriving as this movemeddletown and Cedar Creek that night, while the enemy escaped to Fisher's Hill. Having been reenforeed by the return of Williams's divisionof the 25th, and after light skirmishing occupied Strasburg and Fisher's Hill, the enemy continuing his retreat toward Woodstock and Mount Jackson. Our army remained in camp at Strasburg and Fisher's Hill, awaiting supplies, until April 1st. On the morning of April 1st our forc had passed over the mountains and attacked Jackson's forces at Fisher's Hill. General Shields, at Front Royal, was informed of the fight goi
Luray (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
advanced and occupied Harrisonburg, while Shields's division held the roads to Luray, the crossings of the Shenandoah, and New Market. General Banks, in General ord right at Harrisonburg, and our left near the crossing of the Shenandoah toward Luray. Under cover of these a part of the force under Edward Johnson moved, on the 7ur division returned to Front Royal and encamped two miles south on the road to Luray. By the wisdom (?) of Generals McDowell and Shields, our division was sent uther to strike Jackson or communicate with Fremont. Shields's division reached Luray June 4th, after having marched 1150 miles in forty-three days, fighting one sevbrigade was at Columbia crossing, 8 miles south, and mine was 6 miles north of Luray. Fremont's and Jackson's guns were distinctly heard beyond the river and mount yet fifteen miles in rear. My brigade, under orders for Stanardsville, passed Luray and encamped with Ferry's, and on the 9th moved forward, leaving Ferry in his p
Rectortown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
promptly taken to prepare our troops to meet them. The Confederates were held in check several hours, and that night Banks's retreat was continued toward Martinsburg. See p. 288.--Editors. With the information of this reverse came the order directing Shields's division to move back to the Shenandoah, while Fremont crossed the mountains to strike the army of Jackson before it could retreat from the valley. On the 25th Shields's division commenced its return, and, without halting, reached Rectortown on the evening of the 28th, where we stopped for rest and to await supplies. At 4 P. M. of the 29th the following order was received: Colonel Kimball, commanding First Brigade: You will march immediately; leave your teams and wagons, take only ambulances, ammunition-wagons, and provisions, as much as on hand in haversacks. Shields, Brigadier-General commanding. At 6 P. M. my command was moving for Front Royal. Marching all night (save 2 1/2 hours for rest and refreshment at Manassas
Cacapon (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
re received directing General Lander to move his division from West Virginia into the valley of the Shenandoah, to unite with the divisions under General Banks in the operations already begun against Stonewall Jackson. For an account of Jackson's early operations in the valley, see Vol. I., p. 111. But the brave Lander was not again to lead us. When the order came, it found him overcome by exposures and hardships, and on the 2d of March he died, at the camp of the division, on the Great Cacapon River. The division began the movement under this order on the 5th, and on the 7th, while we were on the way, General Shields arrived from Washington and assumed command. General Banks had already crossed the Potomac with his divisions, and with but little opposition had occupied Harper's Ferry, Charlestown, and Martinsburg, the enemy retiring toward Winchester. The object of this movement under Banks was the protection of the reopening of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad west of Harp
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