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Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.37
thought that Hooker was still there. He immediately issued an order for the concentration at Gettysburg, and sent for Robertson's command, that had been left, he says, to hold the mountain passes, aamsport, about twenty-five miles to the west of it, on July 1st, the day the fighting began at Gettysburg. When General Lee crossed the Potomac, he left General Robertson between him and the enemy. ld have been concentrated and ready for attack; a defensive battle would have been fought, and Gettysburg might have been to Southern hearts something more than a Glorious field of grief. Washd, and 5 were reported missing. That fight at Fairfield, on the last day of the fighting at Gettysburg, refutes the imputation intended by Colonel Mosby to be conveyed in his remark that my commands there intimated, it may be assumed that neither Stuart nor Lee had any reason to complain of my command. James Longstreet. Buforo's cavalry opposing the Confederate advance upon Gettysburg.
Fairfield, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.37
ed forward with my command and intercepted the advance of General Pleasonton, under the command of Major Samuel H. Starr. A severe and gallant fight was made at Fairfield, in which Major Starr of the 6th United States Regular Cavalry was wounded and captured with a large portion of his staff, while his regiment was severely damaged. Adjutant John Allan and three others of the 6th Virginia Cavalry were killed, 19 were wounded, and 5 were reported missing. That fight at Fairfield, on the last day of the fighting at Gettysburg, refutes the imputation intended by Colonel Mosby to be conveyed in his remark that my command did not reach the battle-field. From that fight at Fairfield I was ordered by General R. E. Lee to cover his wagon trains, and in obeying the same my command was engaged in repeated skirmishes, particularly at Funkstown and Hagerstown, after which it returned to Virginia — the last command that recrossed the Potomac. If there existed the least ground for Colone
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 4.37
its failure by General Long, the biographer of Lee, and by General Longstreet. Both ignore the fact that Stuart left with General Lee, under command of General Beverly H. Robertson, a larger body pherdstown, west of the Blue Ridge. That General Lee was greatly embarrassed by want of intelligresponsible for the inefficient manner in which Lee was served. When it was determined that Stuaorm out-post duty for the army in Virginia, General Lee was in the Shenandoah Valley with the corpsps, and he determined, with the approval of General Lee, to pass around, or rather through, them, aE. B. Stuart, Commanding Cavalry. General: General Lee has inclosed to me this letter for you to bm, very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. On the following day General Lentire satisfaction as well as to that of General R. E. Lee. These orders embraced the duty of holdt, in force, unless otherwise ordered by General R. E. Lee, Lieutenant-General Longstreet, or mysel[4 more...]
Richard S. Ewell (search for this): chapter 4.37
d that Stuart should take three brigades of cavalry to join Ewell on the Susquehanna and leave his other two to perform out-ps around, or rather through, them, as the shortest route to Ewell. There was an opportunity besides to inflict much damage aupplies you can for the use of the army. One column of General Ewell's army will probably move toward the Susquehanna by the crossing the river, you must move on and feel the right of Ewell's troops, collecting information, provisions, etc. Give insto Maryland, after to-morrow, the better. The movements of Ewell's corps are as stated in my former letter. Hill's first diim. Thus all communication was broken with Generals Lee and Ewell. The march of Hill's and Longstreet's corps on the day befee days after they had gone. As Stuart had been ordered to Ewell on the Susquehanna, it could not have been expected that hes to divide the cavalry and take three brigades with him to Ewell, on the Susquehanna, were peremptory; he was only given dis
Micah Jenkins (search for this): chapter 4.37
-self in communication with him, guard his flank and keep him informed of the enemy's movements, and collect all the supplies you can for the use of the army. One column of General Ewell's army will probably move toward the Susquehanna by the Emmitsburg route, an-other by Chambersburg. Accounts from him last night state that there was no enemy west of Fredericktown. A cavalry force (about one hundred) guarded the Monocacy bridge, which was barricaded. You will, of course, take charge of Jenkins's brigade and give him necessary instructions. All supplies taken in Maryland must be by authorized staff-officers for their respective departments, by no one else. They will be paid for or receipts for the same given to the owners. I will send you a general order on this subject, which I wish you to see is strictly complied with. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. On the following day General Lee wrote as follows: headquarters, army of Northern Vi
join Ewell on the Susquehanna and leave his other two to perform out-post duty for the army in Virginia, General Lee was in the Shenandoah Valley with the corps of Hill and Longstreet. The latter was holding the gaps and Stuart was guarding the approaches to them east of the ridge. Hence Stuart came under Longstreet's orders. Ho counteract them; but I think the sooner you cross into Maryland, after to-morrow, the better. The movements of Ewell's corps are as stated in my former letter. Hill's first division will reach the Potomac to-day, and Longstreet will follow to-morrow. Be watchful and circumspect in all your movements. I am very respectfully aing the river in advance of the enemy, as he had expected, he was two days behind him. Thus all communication was broken with Generals Lee and Ewell. The march of Hill's and Longstreet's corps on the day before had been in full view of the signal stations on Maryland Heights and was telegraphed to Hooker, who made a corresponding
W. E. Jones (search for this): chapter 4.37
headquarters, cavalry division, army of Northern Virginia, June 24th, 1863.Brigadier-General B. H. Robertson, Commanding Cavalry. General: Your own and General Jones's brigades will cover the front of Ashby's and Snicker's Gaps, yourself, as senior officer, being in command. Your object will be to watch the enemy, decei mentioned, you withdraw, sweep the valley clear of what pertains to the army and cross the Potomac at the different points crossed by it. You will instruct General Jones from time to time as the movements progress, or events may require, and report anything of importance to Lieutenant-General Longstreet, with whose position you will communicate by relays through Charlestown. I send instructions for General Jones, which please read. Avail yourself of every means in your power to increase the efficiency of your command and keep it up to the highest number possible. Particular attention will be paid to shoeing horses, and to marching off of the turnpi
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 4.37
d you can be spared from my front, and provided I think you can move across the Potomac without disclosing our plans. He speaks of your leaving via Hopewell Gap and passing by the rear of the enemy. If you can get through by that route, I think that you will be less likely to indicate what our plans are than if you should cross by passing to our rear. I forward the letter of instructions with these suggestions. Please advise me of the condition of affairs before you leave, and order General Hampton--whom I suppose you will leave here in command — to report to me at Millwood either by letter or in person, as may be most agreeable to him. Most respectfully, J. Longstreet, Lieutenant-General.--N. B. I think that your passage of the Potomac by our rear at the present moment will in a measure disclose our plans. You had better not leave us, therefore, unless you can take the proposed route in rear of the enemy. J. Longstreet, Lieutenant-General. headquarters, 22d June, 1863. Major-
Alfred Pleasonton (search for this): chapter 4.37
nsinuates, a courier from General Lee met me. My command was hurried from there to Chambersburg, and thence by forced march, on the night of July 2d, to Cashtown, where it arrived at about 10 A. M. on July 3d. Ascertaining at Cashtown that General Pleasonton was moving from Emmitsburg directly on the baggage and ammunition trains of General Lee's army, which were exposed to his attack without defense of any kind, I pressed forward with my command and intercepted the advance of General PleasontoGeneral Pleasonton, under the command of Major Samuel H. Starr. A severe and gallant fight was made at Fairfield, in which Major Starr of the 6th United States Regular Cavalry was wounded and captured with a large portion of his staff, while his regiment was severely damaged. Adjutant John Allan and three others of the 6th Virginia Cavalry were killed, 19 were wounded, and 5 were reported missing. That fight at Fairfield, on the last day of the fighting at Gettysburg, refutes the imputation intended by Colo
Beverly H. Robertson (search for this): chapter 4.37
with General Lee, under command of General Beverly H. Robertson, a larger body of cavalry than he tg of the 24th to pass around Hooker, leaving Robertson about Middleburg with 3000 cavalry and 2 batning of June 26th the enemy disappeared from Robertson's front and crossed the Potomac. In that evhe concentration at Gettysburg, and sent for Robertson's command, that had been left, he says, to hth each other. Lee must then have relied on Robertson or nobody to watch Hooker. Instead of keeGeneral Lee crossed the Potomac, he left General Robertson between him and the enemy. By July 3d RRobertson had so manoeuvred that Lee was between him and the enemy. Stuart had ridden around General Hooker while Robertson was riding around General Lee. If, in accordance with Stuart's instructions, Robertson had promptly followed on the right of the army when the enemy left, Lee's forces woulrthern Virginia, June 24th, 1863.Brigadier-General B. H. Robertson, Commanding Cavalry. General[4 more...]
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