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Donaldsonville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
im to make the district safe in view of the projected operations on the Mississippi; a strong work was constructed at Donaldsonville commanding the head of the bayou; and intrenchments were thrown up at Brashear City to prevent, with the aid of the nBerwick Bay, surprised and captured the garrisons at Brashear City and Bayou Boeuf almost without resistance, menaced Donaldsonville, carried havoc and panic through the La Fourche, and finally planted batteries on the Mississippi to cut off our communication with New Orleans. At Donaldsonville, however, an assault by about 1500 Texans was repulsed by about 200 men, including convalescents, under Major J. D. Bullen, 28th Maine, Aided by the gun-boats Princess Royal, Commander M. B. Woolsey, hile the ceremonies of capitulation were going on, Weitzel led Augur's division aboard the transports and hastened to Donaldsonville to drive Taylor out of the La Fourche. Grover followed. On the 13th, at Koch's plantation, Green and Major suddenly
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
country and drove him back toward Opelousas. After the fall of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, Grant sent Herron's division, and the Thirteenth Corps under Ord, to report to Banks. Banks went to Vicksburg to consult with Grant, and Grant came to New Orleans; together they agreed with Admiral Farragut in urging an immediate attack on Mobile. This was the only true policy; success would have been easy and must have influenced powerfully the later campaigns that centered about Chattanooga and Atlanta; but for reasons avowedly political rather than military, the Government ordered, instead, an attempt to plant the flag at some point in Texas. The unaccountable failure at Sabine Pass followed, In September a detachment of the Nineteenth Corps, under Franklin, convoyed by the navy, was sent by sea to effect a landing at Sabine Pass, and thence operate against Houston and Galveston; but the gun-boats meeting with a disaster in an encounter with the Confederate batteries, the expedition
Clinton, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
our men rang out as the word passed, and again the forest echoed with the strains of the Star-spangled banner from the long-silent bands. Firing died away, the men began to mingle in spite of everything, and about 2 o'clock next morning came the long, gray envelope that meant surrender. Formalities alone remained; these were long, but the articles were signed on the afternoon of the 8th; a moment later a long train of wagons loaded with rations for the famished garrison moved down the Clinton road, and on the morning of the 9th a picked force of eight regiments, under Brigadier-General George L. Andrews, marched in with bands playing and colors flying; the Confederates stacked arms and hauled down their flag, and the National ensign floated in its stead. By General Banks's order, General Gardner's sword was returned to him in the presence of his men in recognition of the heroic defense — a worthy act, well merited. But, stout as the defense had been, the besiegers had on the
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
an! The cavalry was poor, except the six old companies, and was quite insufficient in numbers. Of land and water transportation, both indispensable to any possible operation, there was barely enough for the movement of a single division. In Washington, Banks had been led to expect that he would find in the depots, or in the country, all material required for moving his army; yet the supplies in the depots barely sufficed for the old force of the department, while the country could furnish very little at best, and nothing at all until it should be occupied. Banks had finally to send his chief quartermaster back to Washington before these deficiencies could be supplied. Again, Banks had not been informed until he reached New Orleans that the Confederates held in force any fortified place below Vicksburg, yet Port Hudson, 135 miles above New Orleans, was found strongly intrenched, with Sharp-Shooters of the 75th N. Y. Volunteers picking off the gunners of the Confederate gun-b
Atchafalaya River (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
ll until it should be occupied. Banks had finally to send his chief quartermaster back to Washington before these deficiencies could be supplied. Again, Banks had not been informed until he reached New Orleans that the Confederates held in force any fortified place below Vicksburg, yet Port Hudson, 135 miles above New Orleans, was found strongly intrenched, with Sharp-Shooters of the 75th N. Y. Volunteers picking off the gunners of the Confederate gun-boat cotton, in the action at Bayou Teche, La., January 14, 1863. from a sketch made at the time. 21 heavy guns in position, and a garrison of 12,000 men-in-creased to 16,000 before Banks could have brought an equal number to the attack. Banks could not communicate with the commander of the northern column, and knew practically nothing of its movements. Under these conditions, all concert between the cooperating forces was rendered impossible from the start, and it became inevitable that the expectations of the Governmen
Natchitoches (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
ries of Port Hudson with part of his fleet, control the long reach above, and cut off the Confederate supplies from the Red River country. General Banks fell in with the admiral's plans, and, concentrating 17,000 men at Baton Rouge, moved to the re display of fireworks I ever witnessed, and the costliest. [See p. 566.] This gave the navy command of the mouth of Red River, and, accordingly, Banks at once reverted to the execution of his former plan,--a turning movement by the Atchafalaya. l Grant would send an army corps to Bayou Sara to join in reducing Port Hudson. Banks moved on to Alexandria, on the Red River, to push Taylor farther out of the way. Taylor retired toward Shreveport. On the 14th of May the The baggage train oriver by the ingenuity and skill of Major Joseph Bailey, 4th Wisconsin, whose success here led to its repetition on the Red River the next year, when Admiral Porter's fleet was rescued.--R. B. I. Many of the guns were ruined, some had been struck ov
Sabine Pass (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
fully the later campaigns that centered about Chattanooga and Atlanta; but for reasons avowedly political rather than military, the Government ordered, instead, an attempt to plant the flag at some point in Texas. The unaccountable failure at Sabine Pass followed, In September a detachment of the Nineteenth Corps, under Franklin, convoyed by the navy, was sent by sea to effect a landing at Sabine Pass, and thence operate against Houston and Galveston; but the gun-boats meeting with a disastss followed, In September a detachment of the Nineteenth Corps, under Franklin, convoyed by the navy, was sent by sea to effect a landing at Sabine Pass, and thence operate against Houston and Galveston; but the gun-boats meeting with a disaster in an encounter with the Confederate batteries, the expedition returned to New Orleans without having accomplished anything.--R. B. I. then the occupation of the Texan coast by the Thirteenth Corps. So the favorable moment passed and 1863 wore away.
Brashear City (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
rche, was strengthened so as to enable him to make the district safe in view of the projected operations on the Mississippi; a strong work was constructed at Donaldsonville commanding the head of the bayou; and intrenchments were thrown up at Brashear City to prevent, with the aid of the navy, any approach of the enemy from the direction of Berwick Bay. On the 14th of January, having crossed the bay, Weitzel ascended the Teche, accompanied by the gun-boats Calhoun, Estrella, and Kinsman, under not held him to his post. Meanwhile Taylor with his forces, reorganized and reenforced until they again numbered four or five thousand, had crossed the Atchafalaya at Morgan's Ferry and Berwick Bay, surprised and captured the garrisons at Brashear City and Bayou Boeuf almost without resistance, menaced Donaldsonville, carried havoc and panic through the La Fourche, and finally planted batteries on the Mississippi to cut off our communication with New Orleans. At Donaldsonville, however, an
Centreville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
s by the Bayou Sara road toward Port Hudson, Saturday, march 14, 1863. from a sketch made at the time. by Closson's battery, went out and drove them away. At 6 the division took up the line of march to the Teche and bivouacked at nightfall on Madame Porter's plantation, five miles distant. Meanwhile Banks had moved Emory and Weitzel slowly up the Teche, seeking to hold Taylor's forces in position until Grover could gain their rear. Taylor fell back behind the intrenched lines below Centreville known as Fort Bisland, and there a brisk engagement took place on the 13th, Banks only seeking to gain a good position on both sides of the bayou, and to occupy the enemy's attention, while he listened in vain for Grover's guns, which were to have been the signal for a direct and determined attack in front. At night, knowing that Grover's movement must certainly have been seen and reported daring his passage up Grand Lake and surmising some miscarriage, Banks gave orders to carry the w
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.81
he war ended. An attempt followed to occupy Galveston, apparently under importunity from Brigadier-General Andrew J. Hamilton, and in furtherance of the policy that had led the Government to send him with the expedition as military governor of Texas. This resulted on the 1st of January in a military and naval disaster in which three companies of the 42d Massachusetts regiment, under Colonel Isaac S. Burrell, were taken prisoners by the Confederates under Magruder. On the 21st of Decemberbeen easy and must have influenced powerfully the later campaigns that centered about Chattanooga and Atlanta; but for reasons avowedly political rather than military, the Government ordered, instead, an attempt to plant the flag at some point in Texas. The unaccountable failure at Sabine Pass followed, In September a detachment of the Nineteenth Corps, under Franklin, convoyed by the navy, was sent by sea to effect a landing at Sabine Pass, and thence operate against Houston and Galveston;
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