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Richard B. Irwin (search for this): chapter 6.81
The capture of Port Hudson. by Richard B. Irwin, Lieutenant-Colonel, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. V. General Banks arrived in New Orleans on the 14th of December, 1862, with the advance of a fleet of transports from New York and Hampton Roads, bringing reenforcements for the Department of the Gulf. These reenforcements finally included 39 regiments of infantry (of which 22 were 9-months' men), six batteries of artillery, and one battalion of cavalry. On the 15th he took command of the department, Butler then formally taking leave of the troops. His orders were to move up the Mississippi, in order to open the river, in cooperation with McClernand's column from Cairo. Banks was to take command of the combined forces as soon as they should meet. On the 16th General Grover, with 12 regiments and a battery, without disembarking at New Orleans, accompanied by two batteries and two troops of cavalry from the old force, and convoyed by a detachment of Farragut's fleet under
A. W. Weaver (search for this): chapter 6.81
ptured the garrisons at Brashear City and Bayou Boeuf almost without resistance, menaced Donaldsonville, carried havoc and panic through the La Fourche, and finally planted batteries on the Mississippi to cut off our communication with New Orleans. At Donaldsonville, however, an assault by about 1500 Texans was repulsed by about 200 men, including convalescents, under Major J. D. Bullen, 28th Maine, Aided by the gun-boats Princess Royal, Commander M. B. Woolsey, and Winona, Lieutenant-Commander A. W. Weaver. and at La Fourche Crossing Taylor's forces suffered another check at the hands of a detachment under Lieutenant-Colonel Albert Stickney, 47th Massachusetts. Otherwise Taylor, whose operations were conducted with marked skill and vigor, had everything his own way. In New Orleans great was the excitement when it was known that the Confederate forces were on the west bank within a few miles of the city; but fortunately the illness that had deprived Emory's division of its comman
Strong Vincent (search for this): chapter 6.81
r by the stranding of the Arizona. When the proposed landing-place at Madame Porter's plantation was reached after dark, the road was found to be under water and impassable, but a practicable way was discovered six miles farther up the lake, at McWilliams's plantation. There the landing began early on the 13th, and with great difficulty, owing to the shallowness of the water, was completed by 4 o'clock in the afternoon. Favored by the woods and undergrowth, which concealed their numbers, Vincent's 2d Louisiana and Reily's 4th Texas Cavalry, with a section of Cornay's battery, delayed the advance until Dwight's brigade, supported by two regiments of Birge's and March of the Nineteenth army Corps by the Bayou Sara road toward Port Hudson, Saturday, march 14, 1863. from a sketch made at the time. by Closson's battery, went out and drove them away. At 6 the division took up the line of march to the Teche and bivouacked at nightfall on Madame Porter's plantation, five miles distan
Richard E. Holcomb (search for this): chapter 6.81
nder Colonel Isaac S. Burrell, were taken prisoners by the Confederates under Magruder. On the 21st of December three companies of the 42d Massachusetts, under Colonel Isaac S. Burrell, were dispatched from New Orleans, without disembarking. Holcomb's 2d Vermont battery was sent with them, but, waiting for its horses to arrive, did not go ashore. Burrell landed at Kuhn's wharf on the 24th, took nominal possession of the town, but really occupied only the wharf itself, protected by barricadg the naval truce, thought it had been violated; accordingly the Clifton, Owasco, and Sachem put to sea, preceded by the army transport steamers, the Saxon, which had brought the three unlucky companies of the 42d, and the Mary A. Boardman, with Holcomb's 2d Vermont battery still aboard. The Confederates lost 26 killed and 117 wounded; the Union troops 5 killed and 15 wounded.-R. B. I. [See also p. 571.] Weitzel, who was occupying the La Fourche, was strengthened so as to enable him to mak
Thomas W. Sherman (search for this): chapter 6.81
ing the Harriet Lane at Galveston. See previous page. After providing for the garrisons and the secure defense of New Orleans, Banks organized his available forces in four divisions, commanded by Major-General C. C. Augur and Brigadier-Generals Thomas W. Sherman, William H. Emory, and Cuvier Grover. Each division was composed of three brigades with three field-batteries, and there were also two battalions and six troops of cavalry, numbering about 700 effectives, and a regiment of heavy ar lost 15 killed, 71 wounded, 14 missing,--total, 1.00; the Confederates, 89. just in time, apparently, to prevent the evacuation, which had been ordered by General Johnston and afterward countermanded by President Davis. With Augur we found T. W. Sherman and two brigades from New Orleans. When the investment was completed on the 26th, we had about 14,000 men of all arms in front of the works, and behind them the Confederates had about 7000, under Major-General Frank Gardner. Part of the g
Madame Porter's plantation was reached after dark, the road was found to be under water and impassable, but a practicable way was discovered six miles farther up the lake, at McWilliams's plantation. There the landing began early on the 13th, and with great difficulty, owing to the shallowness of the water, was completed by 4 o'clock in the afternoon. Favored by the woods and undergrowth, which concealed their numbers, Vincent's 2d Louisiana and Reily's 4th Texas Cavalry, with a section of Cornay's battery, delayed the advance until Dwight's brigade, supported by two regiments of Birge's and March of the Nineteenth army Corps by the Bayou Sara road toward Port Hudson, Saturday, march 14, 1863. from a sketch made at the time. by Closson's battery, went out and drove them away. At 6 the division took up the line of march to the Teche and bivouacked at nightfall on Madame Porter's plantation, five miles distant. Meanwhile Banks had moved Emory and Weitzel slowly up the Teche, s
went to Vicksburg to consult with Grant, and Grant came to New Orleans; together they agreed with Admiral Farragut in urging an immediate attack on Mobile. This was the only true policy; success would have been easy and must have influenced powerfully the later campaigns that centered about Chattanooga and Atlanta; but for reasons avowedly political rather than military, the Government ordered, instead, an attempt to plant the flag at some point in Texas. The unaccountable failure at Sabine Pass followed, In September a detachment of the Nineteenth Corps, under Franklin, convoyed by the navy, was sent by sea to effect a landing at Sabine Pass, and thence operate against Houston and Galveston; but the gun-boats meeting with a disaster in an encounter with the Confederate batteries, the expedition returned to New Orleans without having accomplished anything.--R. B. I. then the occupation of the Texan coast by the Thirteenth Corps. So the favorable moment passed and 1863 wore away.
A. P. Cooke (search for this): chapter 6.81
ates to destroy the gun-boat Cotton, and took 50 prisoners, with a loss of 6 killed and 27 wounded. Among the dead was Buchanan, who was succeeded by Lieutenant-Commander A. P. Cooke. Magruder's men boarding the Harriet Lane at Galveston. See previous page. After providing for the garrisons and the secure defense of New Oed many prisoners on the march. Their gun-boats came down the Atchafalaya too late to dispute Grover's landing, were defeated by our flotilla, under Lieutenant-Commander A. P. Cooke, and the Queen of the West was destroyed. On the 20th Butte-à--la-Rose, with sixty men and two heavy guns, surrendered to Cooke, and the same day BaCooke, and the same day Banks occupied Opelousas. Here he received his first communication from General Grant, dated before Vicksburg, March 23d, and sent through Admiral Farragut. This opened a correspondence, the practical effect of which was to cause General Banks to conform his movements to the expectation that General Grant would send an army corps
Joseph Bailey (search for this): chapter 6.81
d because its hour had come. The garrison was literally starving. With less than 3000 famished men in line, powerful mines beneath the salients, and a last assault about to be delivered at 10 paces, what else was left to do? With the post there fell into our hands 6340 prisoners, 20 heavy guns, 31 field-pieces, about 7500 muskets, and two river steamers. Starlight and Red Chief, found aground in Thompson's Creek, floated and brought into the river by the ingenuity and skill of Major Joseph Bailey, 4th Wisconsin, whose success here led to its repetition on the Red River the next year, when Admiral Porter's fleet was rescued.--R. B. I. Many of the guns were ruined, some had been struck over and over again, and the depots and magazines were empty. The garrison also lost about 500 prisoners or deserters before the surrender, and about 700 killed and wounded. Our loss was 707 killed, 3336 wounded, 319 missing,--total, 4362. The army was greatly assisted by Admiral Farragut's fl
Richard Taylor (search for this): chapter 6.81
y the Atchafalaya. That involved disposing of Taylor's force of about 4000 or 5000 men encamped andFranklin. Our force was so much stronger than Taylor's as to suggest the idea of capturing him in hnt. So perfectly was the movement masked that Taylor was actually preparing to attack the force in d Weitzel slowly up the Teche, seeking to hold Taylor's forces in position until Grover could gain t River, to push Taylor farther out of the way. Taylor retired toward Shreveport. On the 14th of Maygrowing daily less by casualties and sickness, Taylor menacing our communications on the west bank outy had not held him to his post. Meanwhile Taylor with his forces, reorganized and reenforced unander A. W. Weaver. and at La Fourche Crossing Taylor's forces suffered another check at the hands olbert Stickney, 47th Massachusetts. Otherwise Taylor, whose operations were conducted with marked ssports and hastened to Donaldsonville to drive Taylor out of the La Fourche. Grover followed. On t[5 more...]
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