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France (France) (search for this): chapter 12.92
Surgeon of the Kearsarge. Deck of a ship. On Sunday, the 12th of June, 1864, the Kearsarge, Captain John A. Winslow, was lying at anchor in the Scheldt, off Flushing, Holland. The cornet suddenly appeared at the fore, and a gun was fired. These were unexpected signals that compelled absent officers and men to return to the ship. Steam was raised, and as soon as we were off, and all hands called, Captain Winslow gave the welcome news of a telegram from Mr. Dayton, our minister to France, announcing that the Alabama had arrived the day previous at Cherbourg; hence the urgency of departure, the probability of an encounter, and the expectation of her capture or destruction. The crew responded with cheers. The succeeding day witnessed the arrival of the Kearsarge at Dover for dispatches, and the day after (Tuesday) her appearance off Cherbourg, where we saw the Confederate flag flying within the breakwater. As we approached, officers and men gathered in groups on deck, and l
Lancaster (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12.92
d enemy. Instead of remaining at a distance of about four hundred yards from the Alabama, and from this position sending two boats, the other boats being injured, the Kearsarge by steaming close to the settling ship, and in the midst of the defeated, could have captured all — Semmes, officers, and men. Captain Semmes says: There was no appearance of any boat coming to me from the enemy after the ship went down. Fortunately, however, the steam-yacht Deerhound, owned by a gentleman of Lancashire, England, Mr. John Lancaster, who was himself on board, steamed up in the midst of my drowning men, and rescued a number of both officers and men from the water. I was fortunate enough myself thus to escape to the shelter of the neutral flag, together with about forty others, all told. About this time the Kearsarge sent one, and then, tardily, another boat. This imputation of inhumanity is contradicted by Mr. Lancaster's assertion that he was requested to do what he could to save the poor
more than a year previous to the fight, while at the Azores. It was the suggestion of the executive officer, Lieutenant-Commander James S. Thornton, to hang the sheet-chain (or spare anchor-cable) over the sides, so as to protect. the midship section, he having served with Admiral Farragut in passing the forts to reach New Orleans, and having observed its benefit on that occasion. The work was done in three days, at a cost for mateerial not exceeding seventy-five dollars. In our visit to European ports, the use of sheet-chains for protective purposes had attracted notice and caused comment. It is strange that Captain Semmes did not know of the chain armor; supposed spies had been on board and had been shown through the ship, as there was no attempt at concealment; the same pilot had been employed by both ships, and had visited each during the preparation for battle. The Alabama had bunkers full of coal, which brought. her down in the water. The Kearsarge was deficient in seventy
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 12.92
cruising to and fro off the breakwater. A message was brought from Mr. Dayton, our minister to Paris, by his son, who with difficulty had obtained permission from the French admiral to visit the Keplayed at the mizzen as the flag of victory. He went on shore with the intention of leaving for Paris without delay. In taking leave The crew of the Kearsarge at quarters. From a photograph. ofhe coast made his efforts useless. He remained, witnessed the battle, telegraphed the result to Paris, and was one of the first to go on board and offer congratulations. At a supper in Cherbourg thy; all desired. his recovery and lamented his death. At a dinner given by loyal Americans in Paris to Captain Winslow and two of his officers, a telegram was received announcing the death of Goui of smoke enabling the movements of each ship to be distinctly traced. An. excursion train from Paris arrived in the morning, bringing hundreds of pleasure-seekers, who were unexpectedly favored wit
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 12.92
l of the claims filed against the twelve cruisers for ships and cargoes, up to March 15th, 1872, was $19,782,917.60, all but about six millions of it being charged to the account of the Alabama and Shenandoah. On May 8th, 1871, the Treaty of Washington was concluded, in accordance with which a Tribunal of Arbitration was appointed, which assembled at Geneva. It consisted of Count Frederick Sclopis, named by the King of Italy; Mr. Jacob Staempfli, named by the President of the Swiss Confederaths, until the ship reached Boston, where, when the vessel was repaired, a section of the stern-post containing the embedded shell was cut away and sent to the Navy Department, and was finally deposited in the Ordnance Museum, at the Navy Yard, Washington.--J. M. B. two inches in depth, stopped up and down to eyebolts with marlines, secured by iron dogs, and employed for the purpose of protecting the engines when the upper part of the coal-bunkers was empty, as happened during the action. The
New Castle, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 12.92
he men while fighting which contributed much toward the success of the action. This Sunday naval duel was fought in the presence of more than 15,000 spectators, who, upon the heights of Cherbourg, the breakwater, and rigging of men-of-war, witnessed the last of the Alabama. Among them were the captains, their families, and crews of two merchant ships burnt by the daring cruiser a few days before her arrival at Cherbourg, where they were landed in a nearly destitute condition. Many spectators were provided with spy-glasses and camp-stools, The Kearsarge was burning Newcastle coals, and the Alabama Welsh coals, the difference in the amount of smoke enabling the movements of each ship to be distinctly traced. An. excursion train from Paris arrived in the morning, bringing hundreds of pleasure-seekers, who were unexpectedly favored with the spectacle of a sea-fight. A French gentleman at Boulogne-sur-Mer assured me that the fight was the conversation of Paris for more than a week.
Cherbourg (France) (search for this): chapter 12.92
the Alabama had arrived the day previous at Cherbourg; hence the urgency of departure, the probabid the day after (Tuesday) her appearance off Cherbourg, where we saw the Confederate flag flying wirg, June 14th, 1864. To A. Bonfils, Esq., Cherbourg. Sir: I hear that you were informed by the ain Semmes through Mr. Liais that he came to Cherbourg to fight, and had no intention of leaving. and offer congratulations. At a supper in Cherbourg on Saturday night, several officers of the Aarking the line of shoals to the eastward of Cherbourg, at a distance of about three miles from thethe deck reported a steamer approaching from Cherbourg,--a frequent occurrence, and consequently itt Armstrong and some men, who were landed at Cherbourg. Lieutenant Wilson was the only officer who 15,000 spectators, who, upon the heights of Cherbourg, the breakwater, and rigging of men-of-war, ing cruiser a few days before her arrival at Cherbourg, where they were landed in a nearly destitut[2 more...]
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 12.92
al visit to the French admiral commanding the maritime district, and to the United States commercial agent, bringing on his return the unanticipated news that Captai R. Semmes, Captain. This communication was sent by Mr. Bonfils, the Confederate States Commercial Agent, to Mr. Liais, the United States Commercial Agent, with United States Commercial Agent, with a request that the latter would furnish a copy to Captain Winslow for his guidance. There was no other challenge to combat. The letter that passed between the commEmperor of Brazil; Mr. Charles Francis Adams, named by the President of the United States; and Sir Alexander Cockburn, named by the Queen of Great Britain. The Counsel of Great Britain was Sir Roundell Palmer (afterward Lord Selborne). The United States was represented by William M. Evarts, Caleb Cushing, and Morrison B. Waite. Claims were made by the United States for indirect and national losses, as well as for the actual private losses represented by nearly twenty millions on ships and
Vlissingen (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 12.92
The duel between the Alabama and the Kearsarge. by John M. Browne, Surgeon of the Kearsarge. Deck of a ship. On Sunday, the 12th of June, 1864, the Kearsarge, Captain John A. Winslow, was lying at anchor in the Scheldt, off Flushing, Holland. The cornet suddenly appeared at the fore, and a gun was fired. These were unexpected signals that compelled absent officers and men to return to the ship. Steam was raised, and as soon as we were off, and all hands called, Captain Winslow gave the welcome news of a telegram from Mr. Dayton, our minister to France, announcing that the Alabama had arrived the day previous at Cherbourg; hence the urgency of departure, the probability of an encounter, and the expectation of her capture or destruction. The crew responded with cheers. The succeeding day witnessed the arrival of the Kearsarge at Dover for dispatches, and the day after (Tuesday) her appearance off Cherbourg, where we saw the Confederate flag flying within the breakwate
Melbourne (Victoria, Australia) (search for this): chapter 12.92
ual private losses represented by nearly twenty millions on ships and cargoes. The Tribunal decided that England was in no way responsible for the $1,781,915.43 of losses inflicted by the Tallahassee, Georgia, Chickamauga, Nashville, Retribution, Jeff. Davis, Sallie, Boston, and Sumter; and on September 14th, 1872, it awarded $15,500,000 damages for actual losses of ships and cargoes and interest, on account of the Alabama, the Florida and her tenders, and. the Shenandoah after she left Melbourne.--editors. The number of the ship's company of the Kearsarge was 163. That of the Alabama, from the best information, was estimated at 150. The chain plating was made of one hundred and twenty fathoms of sheet-chains of one and seventenths inch iron, covering a space amidships of forty-nine and one-half feet in length by six feet The shell in the stern-post of the Kearsarge. The charge was withdrawn from the shell, which was boxed in, and in that condition it remained for months,
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