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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. Search the whole document.

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Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.27
eral Bushrod Johnson, who had hurried from Drewry's Bluff to take part in this action, was of materillery, and began an immediate march toward Drewry's Bluff, with orders to form there, or thereabout,cted him to do, should I assume command at Drewry's Bluff, and give the enemy battle there, I left f3 o'clock in the morning when I arrived at Drewry's Bluff. Without a moment's delay, I held a consu, and sent Colonel Map of operations at Drewry's Bluff, Bermuda hundred and deep Bottom. Stevens t the plan a good one, and came at once to Drewry's Bluff to confer with me. I proposed that Gene banks of James River, somewhat abreast of Drewry's Bluff, and by this manoeuvre insure his unconditainly knew where and at what distance from Drewry's Bluff General Lee's army was at that moment, gavs the result of the Confederate victory at Drewry's Bluff, it had thwarted and annulled the main objle of Ransom's division was withdrawn from Drewry's Bluff and marched back to Richmond. I was then [5 more...]
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.27
I would attack Butler's right flank, with almost the certainty of separating him from his base at Bermuda Hundred, and thus obtaining an easy victory over him. I proposed also, as an essential feature to the entire success of my plan, that, while this movement should be in progress, General Whiting, with all his available forces at Petersburg, amounting to about four thousand men, should march from Port Walthall Junction and fall upon Butler's right rear, forcing him to the very banks of James River, somewhat abreast of Drewry's Bluff, and by this manoeuvre insure his unconditional surrender. And I proposed, furthermore, that with my own forces, added to those temporarily taken from the Army of Northern Virginia and the environs of Richmond, I should cross the James after disposing of Butler, and by a concerted movement strike General Grant on his left flank, while General Lee should attack him in front. General Bragg, who certainly knew where and at what distance from Drewry's B
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.27
mmand, rendering their immediate concentration at any threatened point very difficult, if not impossible. The destination of General Burnside's corps was not, as yet, well defined. The opinion was entertained by many that it would march upon Richmond via Petersburg. Others thought its aim was Weldon. On either hypothesis we should have been prepared to meet the assault in time, and, clearly, we were not. As a matter of fact, when the Ninth Corps, under General Burnside, came from east Tennessee, it simply went to increase the strength of the Army of the Potomac. But the forces under General Butler, with the addition of the corps commanded by General Gillmore and by General Smith, amounted to about thirty thousand men, General William F. Smith estimates the force at forty thousand. [See p. 207.] On the basis of the Official records it would appear to have been about 36,000.--editors. and were evidently being prepared for a determined advance upon Petersburg. Thus was the p
Proctor's Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.27
e Hoke, on whose front the enemy had been allowed to mass his forces by the inaction of the left. Ransom was ordered to change the front of his right brigade and support it by another, en ├ęchelon; then to push forward a third brigade toward Proctor's Creek and to keep a fourth one in reserve. This was to be temporary only, and the plan, as originally adopted, was to be executed as soon as we had taken possession of the river and of Proctor's Creek crossing. But the reserve brigade was alreadd from which Corse and Clingman had compelled him to retire, but held his own, none the less, with much stubbornness in Hagood's and Johnson's front; and, though giving way to Johnson's right, succeeded in securing a good position abreast of Proctor's Creek, near the turnpike, and also at the Charles Friend house. But General Johnson, with the timely assistance of the Washington Artillery, finally drove back the opposing forces from his right flank, and was thus enabled to clear his entire fro
t 10:45 A. M., I sent a telegram to General Whiting directing him. to march to Port Walthall and join in the attack. The text of the orders is as follows: I shall attack enemy to-morrow at daylight by river road, to cut him off from his Bermuda base. You will take up your position to-night on Swift Creek, with Wise's, Martin's, Dearing's, and two regiments of Colquitt's brigade, with about twenty pieces under Colonel Jones. At day-break you will march to Port Walthall Junction; and wmmediate advantage of the fact, and caused Smith's entire corps, numbering some sixteen thousand men, to be transferred from the Army of the James to the Army of the Potomac. Butler winced under the order, but obeyed. This reduced his force at Bermuda, Hundred to about thirteen thousand. To oppose it I could command not more than twelve thousand men. The difference was insignificant; but it must be remembered that the Federal commander possessed many an advantage which I had not, and that, n
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.27
urriedly following the other, instructing me to withdraw General Hoke and his forces from the outworks of New Berne, which they had already taken, and to rush them on to protect Richmond. There is not an hour to lose, said Mr. Davis in one of his telegrams to me [May 4th]. Had the expedition not started, I would say it should not go. Telegram from Mr. Davis to General Beauregard, May 4th, 1864.--G. T. B. Other troops were also being ordered from other directions, and notably from South Carolina, to assist in the defense of the Confederate capital: first, Hagood's brigade; next, Wise's; and soon afterward, Colquitt's. So great was the anxiety of the Administration at this juncture that Hagood's brigade, which General Pickett, then in command of Petersburg, desired to halt on its passage through that city, was ordered to be pushed on to Richmond without an instant's delay. Telegram from General Bragg to General Beauregard, May 5th, 1864.--G. T. B. I succeeded, however, in havi
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.27
The defense of Drewry's bluff. taken by permission from the North American review for March, 1887, and condensed. by G. T. Beauregard, General, C. S. A. On the 23d of April, 1864, at Weldon, N. C., I assumed command of the Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia. It included Virginia, south of the James and Appomattox, and all that portion of North Carolina east of the mountains. General Beauregard was succeeded in command of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida (April 19th, 1864) by Major-General Samuel Jones.--editors. The War Department was closely engaged at that time with certain operations against Plymouth and New Berne, from which great results were expected at Richmond, but about which the enemy was not much concerned, as the main object of his campaign could in no wise be affected or seriously disturbed by such a diversion. I did not consider this move judicious on the part of the Government, because, irrespective of other conside
Plymouth, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.27
On the 23d of April, 1864, at Weldon, N. C., I assumed command of the Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia. It included Virginia, south of the James and Appomattox, and all that portion of North Carolina east of the mountains. General Beauregard was succeeded in command of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida (April 19th, 1864) by Major-General Samuel Jones.--editors. The War Department was closely engaged at that time with certain operations against Plymouth and New Berne, from which great results were expected at Richmond, but about which the enemy was not much concerned, as the main object of his campaign could in no wise be affected or seriously disturbed by such a diversion. I did not consider this move judicious on the part of the Government, because, irrespective of other considerations, it occasioned an untimely division of some of the most available troops in my new command, rendering their immediate concentration at any threatened poi
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.27
ting joined me on the 17th near midday. He was thoroughly downcast. No word was spoken by him, and no attempt was made to throw off the responsibility of his failure to unite his forces to mine the day previous. He admitted the error of which he had been guilty, and expressed most heart-felt regret. At his own request he was relieved from duty in the field, and returned to the command of his department. His after-conduct during the closing scenes of the war, and his heroic conduct at Fort Fisher, contributed largely to reinstate him in the good opinion of his comrades-in-arms and of the entire South. The forces just arrived from Petersburg had scarcely been put in position, when, by order of the War Department, and against my protest, the whole of Ransom's division was withdrawn from Drewry's Bluff and marched back to Richmond. I was then pursuing the enemy, and still driving him nearer and nearer to his base. Fortunately for us, his rout of the 16th had been such as to prec
Chester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.27
hment of Dearing's command, acting as an escort to General T. M. Logan, one of the bearers of my instructions to General Whiting the day before, who had come, with the utmost celerity and through great danger, to inform me that I need not rely on any advance being made that day by General Whiting. From him I also learned that Dearing, impatient at his commander's tardiness to obey my orders, and desirous of accelerating General Logan's return to me, had encountered the enemy's pickets near Chester, and had gallantly driven them in, forcing them back as far as the Half-way House and capturing a large number of stragglers; that there was great demoralization among the Federal troops; that nothing would have prevented Whiting from capturing the entire force of General Butler, had he followed my instructions. I ordered the original formation of our lines to be resumed, and General Hoke was directed to send two regiments along the Court House road to flank the enemy at that point, if p
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