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Cedar Bluffs (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.58
osecrans organized, in the spring of 1863, for a cavalry raid around the rear of Bragg's army. For this purpose seventeen hundred men were placed under Colonel A. D. Streight, with directions to embark on transports on the Tennessee River at Fort Henry and proceed to Eastport, Mississippi. Colonel Streight reached Eastport and set out thence April 21st. He reached Tuscumbia, Alabama, April 24th, and by May 1st was at Blountsville, Alabama. His objective was Rome, Georgia; but when near Cedar Bluffs, Alabama, twenty-eight miles from Rome, he was attacked and defeated by Forrest. Colonel Streight himself and thirteen hundred men were captured and carried as prisoners to Richmond. While this raid was in progress Colonel J. T. Wilder with a body of 2600 cavalry was destroying the railroads south of Murfreesboro' and capturing a number of prisoners, and other similar movements were being made by Colonels Louis D. Watkins and A. P. Campbell in the direction of Columbia, Tennessee. At
Columbus (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.58
At this time, also, another celebrated cavalry raid took place in Mississippi. Colonel B. H. Grierson of the 6th Illinois Cavalry, taking his own regiment, the 7th Illinois, Colonel Edward Prince, and the 2d Iowa, Colonel Edward Hatch, left La Grange, Tennessee, April 17th, and in sixteen days traversed six hundred miles of the enemy's country and reached Baton Rouge, where a Federal force was stationed. [See map, Vol. III., p. 442.] Hatch's regiment destroyed the railroads east of Columbus, Mississippi, and returned to La Grange, while the remainder of Grierson's force destroyed much of the Mobile and Ohio and Vicksburg and Meridian railroads. This bold and successful raid produced Map of operations in middle Tennessee and North Alabama, 1863-5. a profound sensation, and was of great benefit to General Grant in the Vicksburg campaign. The great activity of the Union cavalry at this period is further shown by the fact that General Stanley in the month of June led a strong fo
Johnsonville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.58
l Wickliffe Cooper, and others, and finally was driven into east Tennessee, where he was killed, at Greenville, on the 4th of September, 1864. [See article by General Duke, p. 243.] In October, 1864, General Hood, having led his army from Georgia into northern Alabama, was organizing for his expedition into Tennessee. At the same time Forrest was operating with his usual energy and activity. On the 30th of October he suddenly appeared with a strong force on the Tennessee River, near Johnsonville, where he captured a gun-boat, the Undine, and two transports — an exploit which excited very general admiration. He then joined Hood near Decatur. At this time General John T. Croxton, with a brigade of Union cavalry, was watching along the north bank of the Tennessee, and on the 7th of November was joined by General Edward Hatch with a division. This body, numbering about three thousand men, kept a sharp lookout for indications of Hood's advance. On the 20th it became apparent that
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.58
rrender of Colonel O. H. Moore, who was stationed there with a portion of his regiment — the 25th Michigan. Colonel Moore returned the famous reply that the 4th of July was not a good day to surrender, and was instantly attacked. After a severe fight Moore drove off his assailants, and saved the bridge over Green River at that point. Morgan crossed below the bridge and passed through Lebanon and Bardstown and on to Brandenburg on the Ohio River; there, seizing a steamboat, he crossed into Indiana, and dashed through that State into Ohio and was captured near Salineville July 26th. [See map and article, Vol. III., p. 635.] This raid has become famous for many reasons, but one of the most notable things pertaining to it was the pursuit and capture of the raider and his men. The pursuit began at Burksville immediately upon Morgan's passage of Cumberland River. The night of the passage four Kentucky cavalry regiments, the 1st, 8th, 9th, and 12th, under Generals J. M. Shackelford and
Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.58
The Confederates on their part also made a celebrated raid at this time. On the 27th of June Morgan crossed the Cumberland River at Burksville, Kentucky, with about 2500 men. He passed northwardly through Columbia, Kentucky, and, reaching Green River at Tebbs's Bend on the 4th of July, demanded the surrender of Colonel O. H. Moore, who was stationed there with a portion of his regiment — the 25th Michigan. Colonel Moore returned the famous reply that the 4th of July was not a good day to surrender, and was instantly attacked. After a severe fight Moore drove off his assailants, and saved the bridge over Green River at that point. Morgan crossed below the bridge and passed through Lebanon and Bardstown and on to Brandenburg on the Ohio River; there, seizing a steamboat, he crossed into Indiana, and dashed through that State into Ohio and was captured near Salineville July 26th. [See map and article, Vol. III., p. 635.] This raid has become famous for many reasons, but one of
Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.58
ing of 1863, for a cavalry raid around the rear of Bragg's army. For this purpose seventeen hundred men were placed under Colonel A. D. Streight, with directions to embark on transports on the Tennessee River at Fort Henry and proceed to Eastport, Mississippi. Colonel Streight reached Eastport and set out thence April 21st. He reached Tuscumbia, Alabama, April 24th, and by May 1st was at Blountsville, Alabama. His objective was Rome, Georgia; but when near Cedar Bluffs, Alabama, twenty-eightEastport and set out thence April 21st. He reached Tuscumbia, Alabama, April 24th, and by May 1st was at Blountsville, Alabama. His objective was Rome, Georgia; but when near Cedar Bluffs, Alabama, twenty-eight miles from Rome, he was attacked and defeated by Forrest. Colonel Streight himself and thirteen hundred men were captured and carried as prisoners to Richmond. While this raid was in progress Colonel J. T. Wilder with a body of 2600 cavalry was destroying the railroads south of Murfreesboro' and capturing a number of prisoners, and other similar movements were being made by Colonels Louis D. Watkins and A. P. Campbell in the direction of Columbia, Tennessee. At this time, also, another cel
Stone River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.58
ville. This successful dash showed that raiding was not to be left wholly to one side. The cavalry under General Stanley was actively used in the advance upon Murfreesboro‘. While numbering only about four thousand effective men, and consequently not expected to cope with the enemy's infantry, it covered the flanks of Rosecrans's army and also kept well to the front, developing the positions of the enemy, and by bold scouting obtained information of movements. During the fighting at Stone's River, December 31st, the Confederate cavalry made its way to the Federal rear for the purpose of cutting communications and destroying supplies. Much damage might then have occurred had not General Stanley's cavalry met and repulsed the raiders. In the fighting which ensued the 3d Kentucky Cavalry, under Colonel E. H. Murray, particularly distinguished itself, also the 1st Ohio Cavalry, under Colonel Minor Milliken, who was killed. After the battle General Stanley kept his command posted i
La Grange (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.58
t this time, also, another celebrated cavalry raid took place in Mississippi. Colonel B. H. Grierson of the 6th Illinois Cavalry, taking his own regiment, the 7th Illinois, Colonel Edward Prince, and the 2d Iowa, Colonel Edward Hatch, left La Grange, Tennessee, April 17th, and in sixteen days traversed six hundred miles of the enemy's country and reached Baton Rouge, where a Federal force was stationed. [See map, Vol. III., p. 442.] Hatch's regiment destroyed the railroads east of Columbus, Mississippi, and returned to La Grange, while the remainder of Grierson's force destroyed much of the Mobile and Ohio and Vicksburg and Meridian railroads. This bold and successful raid produced Map of operations in middle Tennessee and North Alabama, 1863-5. a profound sensation, and was of great benefit to General Grant in the Vicksburg campaign. The great activity of the Union cavalry at this period is further shown by the fact that General Stanley in the month of June led a strong for
Payne Gap (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.58
l Kilpatrick, accompanied General Sherman on his march to the sea; the remainder was placed under General Thomas for the protection of Tennessee against the expected movements of Hood, and went to Tuscumbia early in November, 1864, commanded by General Edward Hatch. During the Atlanta campaign Kentucky was protected against guerrillas and raiders by General S. G. Burbridge. In May he started for Virginia with a large mounted force, and at the same time Morgan came into Kentucky through Pound Gap. This was Morgan's last raid. He was attacked at Cynthiana, Mount Sterling, and Augusta, Kentucky, by the Federal cavalry under Colonel John Mason Brown, Colonel Wickliffe Cooper, and others, and finally was driven into east Tennessee, where he was killed, at Greenville, on the 4th of September, 1864. [See article by General Duke, p. 243.] In October, 1864, General Hood, having led his army from Georgia into northern Alabama, was organizing for his expedition into Tennessee. At the
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.58
the Cumberland, October 30th, 1862, the Union cavalry in Kentucky and Tennessee had not been organized in a separate commanle, a number of cavalry regiments were being recruited in Kentucky, and that State became a general camp of instruction for rfreesboro‘. A little later in December Morgan moved into Kentucky and destroyed bridges on the Louisville and Nashville Raissage of Cumberland River. The night of the passage four Kentucky cavalry regiments, the 1st, 8th, 9th, and 12th, under Genow Bone, only a few miles west of Burksville. Four noted Kentucky officers commanded these regiments, Frank Wolford, B. H. several other regiments were organized at Camp Nelson in Kentucky by Burnside for an expedition to east Tennessee. It was d by General Edward Hatch. During the Atlanta campaign Kentucky was protected against guerrillas and raiders by General Sarge mounted force, and at the same time Morgan came into Kentucky through Pound Gap. This was Morgan's last raid. He was
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