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tes to gain time for the collection of a larger force near Fort Pickens, while that work should remain comparatively empty and absolutely weak, and so be made an easy prey through treachery or assault. Thus for more than two months re-enforcements were kept out of Fort Pickens while the rebellion was gaining head, although the armistice really ended with the closing of the Peace Convention, and its failure to effect a reconciliation. When the new Administration came into power, on the 4th of March, a new line of policy was adopted, more consistent with the National dignity, but not less cautious. Informed that the insurgents were greatly augmented in numbers near Pensacola, and were mounting guns in Fort McRee, and constructing new batteries near, all to bear heavily on Fort Pickens, General Scott again advised the Government to send re-enforcements and supplies to the garrison of that post. The Government acted upon his advice, and by its directions on the same day March 12, 18
I therefore request you to furnish one regiment of infantry without delay, to rendezvous at Harper's Ferry, Virginia. It must consist of ten companies, of not less than sixty-four men each. . . . They will be mustered into the service of the Confederate States at Harper's Ferry. The object of this call to Harper's Ferry will be apparent presently. Virginia, at this time, was in a state of great agitation. Its Convention had passed through a stormy session, extending from the middle of February to the middle of April. It was held in the city of Richmond, and was organized February 13, 1861. by the appointment of John Janney, of Loudon, as its President, and John L. Eubank, Clerk. In his address on taking the chair, the President favored conditional Union, saying, in a tone common to many of the public men of Virginia, that his State would insist on its own construction of its rights as a condition of its remaining in the Union. It was evident, from the beginning, that a better
April 13th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 15
ence with the President on the 13th, April. almost at the very time when, in their State capital, the bells were ringing, Confederate flags were flying, and one hundred guns were thundering, in attestation of the joy of the secessionists because of the attack on Fort Sumter. A telegraphic correspondent at Charleston had said the day before:--That ball fired at Sumter by Edmund Ruffin will do more for the cause of secession in Virginia than volumes of stump speeches. New York Herald, April 13, 1861. The assertion was correct. While the Convention was debating the question of the surrender of Fort Sumter, Governor Letcher sent in a communication from Governor Pickens, announcing the attack on that fortress, and saying:--We will take the fort, and can sink the ships if they attempt to pass the channel. If they land elsewhere, we can whip them. We have now seven thousand of the best troops in the world, and a reserve of ten thousand on the routes to the harbor. The war has commenc
April 12th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 15
Wyandotte, the flag-of-truce vessel lying inside the lower harbor. The wind was high, and the Wyandotte did not go outside until the next morning. At noon April 12, 1861. Worden's message was delivered to Captain Adams, and Fort Pickens was re-enforced that night. Statement of Lieutenant Worden to the author. Lieutenanticinity. Lieutenant Worden, in the mean time, had returned to Pensacola, and departed for home. He left the Sabine about three o'clock in the afternoon, April 12, 1861. landed at Pensacola, and at nine in the evening left there in a railway car for Montgomery, hoping to report at Washington on Monday night. He was disappointe laws of the United States for the prevention and punishment of piracy. Proclamation of President Lincoln, April 19, 1861. Davis had already summoned April 12, 1861. the so-called Congress of the Confederate States to meet at Montgomery on the 29th of April. That body, on the 6th of May, passed an Act with fifteen sectio
November 18th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 15
ade him an object of scorn to Davis and his fellow-conspirators, and the citizens generally; and there, in that common jail, this gallant officer, whose conduct had been governed by the nicest sense of honor, suffered indignity until the 11th of November following, when he was paroled and ordered to report at Richmond, where Davis and his associates were then holding court. Cooper sent him to Norfolk, whence he was forwarded to the flag-ship of Admiral Goldsborough, in Hampton Roads, November 18, 1861. when Lieutenant Sharpe, of the insurgent navy, was exchanged for him. Statement of Lieutenant Worden to the author. Worden was the first prisoner of war held by the insurgents. Lieutenant Worden's family and friends were in much distress concerning his imprisonment, for at times his life seemed to be in great jeopardy among lawless men, and was preserved, doubtless, by the Provost-Marshal of Montgomery, in whom Worden found a friend. Applications to the Confederate Government w
April 4th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 15
on, become ominously silent, while the organs of the conspirators were loudly boastful of a majority in the Convention favorable to secession. The hearts of the genuine Unionists of the old State were saddened by gloomy forebodings, for they knew that their friends in that Convention were continually browbeaten by the truculent secessionists, and that the people were hourly deceived by the most astounding falsehoods put forth by the conspirators. The Commissioners sent to Washington April 4, 1861. obtained a formal audience with the President on the 13th, April. almost at the very time when, in their State capital, the bells were ringing, Confederate flags were flying, and one hundred guns were thundering, in attestation of the joy of the secessionists because of the attack on Fort Sumter. A telegraphic correspondent at Charleston had said the day before:--That ball fired at Sumter by Edmund Ruffin will do more for the cause of secession in Virginia than volumes of stump speech
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