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New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
gdes of the Brooklyn, saying:--At the first favorable moment you will land with your company, re-enforce Fort Pickens, and hold the same till further orders. It was unsafe to send such orders by mail or telegraph, for the insurgents controlled Both in the Gulf States, and this was sent from New York, in duplicate, by two naval vessels. From that time unusual activity was observed in the Navy Yard at Brooklyn; also on Governor's Island and at Fort Hamilton, at the entrance to the harbor of New York. There was activity, too, in the arsenals of the North, for, while the Government wished for peace, it could scarcely indulge a hope that the wish would be gratified. With the order for the fitting out of an expedition for the relief of Fort Sumter was issued a similar order in relation to Fort Pickens. Supplies and munitions for this purpose had been prepared in ample quantity, in a manner to excite the least attention, and between the 6th and 9th of April the chartered steamers Atlan
Warsaw, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Border States the theater of its operations, and, if possible, secure the great advantage of the possession of the National Capital. At various points on his journey northward, Stephens had harangued the people, and everywhere he raised the cry of On to Washington! The New York Commercial Advertiser of April 25th had an account of the experience of a gentleman who had escaped from Fayetteville to avoid impressment into the insurgent army. He traveled on the same train with Stephens from Warsaw to Richmond. At nearly every station, he says, Stephens spoke. The capture of Washington was the grand idea which he enforced, and exhorted the people to join in the enterprise, to which they heartily responded. This was the only thing talked of. It must be done! was his constant exclamation. That cry was already resounding throughout the South. It was an echo or a paraphrase of the prophecy of the Confederate Secretary of War. See extract from Walker's speech at Montgomery on the
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
od the words of Secretary Walker at Montgomery, in regard to the Federal metropolis. It transfers the lines of battle from the Potomac to the Pennsylvania border. The Raleigh Standard of the same date said:--Our streets are alive with soldiers (although North Carolina was a professedly loyal State of the Union), and added, Washington City will be too hot to hold Abraham Lincoln and his Government. North Carolina has said it, and she will do all she can to make good her declaration. The Wilmington (N. C.) Journal said:--When North Carolina regiments go to Washington, and they will go, they will stand side by side with their brethren of the South. The Eufaula (Alabama) Express said, on the 25th: April, 1861.--Our policy at this time should be to seize the old Federal Capital, and take old Lincoln arid his Cabinet prisoners of war. The Milledgeville (Georgia) Southern Recorder of the 30th, inspired by men like Toombs, Cobb, Iverson, and other leaders, said:--The Government of the C
Little Toms Cove (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
e along, on the self-same way, Another old Cove, and began for to say:-- “Let you alone I that's comina it strong! You've ben let alone a darned sight too long! Of all the sarce that ever I heerd! Put down that stick I (You may well look skeered.) Let go that stone! If you once show fight, I'll knock you higher than any kite. You must have a lesson to stop your tricks. And cure you of shying them stones and sticks; And I'll have my hardware back, and my cash, And knock your scow into ‘tarnal smash; And if ever I catches you, round my ranch, I'll string you up to the nearest branch. The best you can do is to go to bed, And keep a decent tongue in your head; For I reckon, before you and I are done, You'll wish you had let honest folks alone.” The Old Cove stopped, and the t'other Old Cove, He sot quite still in his cypress grove, And he looked at his stick revolvina slow, Vether 'twere safe to shy it or no; And he grumbled on, in an injured tone, “All that I ax'd was, Let me a
Loudon, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
anies, of not less than sixty-four men each. . . . They will be mustered into the service of the Confederate States at Harper's Ferry. The object of this call to Harper's Ferry will be apparent presently. Virginia, at this time, was in a state of great agitation. Its Convention had passed through a stormy session, extending from the middle of February to the middle of April. It was held in the city of Richmond, and was organized February 13, 1861. by the appointment of John Janney, of Loudon, as its President, and John L. Eubank, Clerk. In his address on taking the chair, the President favored conditional Union, saying, in a tone common to many of the public men of Virginia, that his State would insist on its own construction of its rights as a condition of its remaining in the Union. It was evident, from the beginning, that a better National sentiment than the President of the Convention evinced was largely dominant in that body, and the conspirators within it were for a long
Key West (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
The Florida forts, 361. Affairs at Key West, 362. the secessionists watched forts Jefferson and Taylor re-enforced, 363. siege of Fort Pickens hesitation of the Government, 364. orderscret preparations to seize Forts Jefferson and Taylor before the politicians of his State had passedern extremity of the Florida peninsula, and Fort Taylor is at Key West, not far distant from the ot There was an armed band of secessionists at Key West, headed by the clerk of Fort Taylor, whose seld attempt to take possession of and occupy Fort Taylor. The disaffected were so numerous that Bras, a crisis seemed to be approaching, and Fort Taylor in 1861. this Fort is near Key West, andKey West, and, with Fort Jefferson, commands the northern entrance to the Gulf of Mexico. It is of great strengt with the island. While the inhabitants of Key West were in the churches, Captain Brannan quietlye for the purpose of capturing the forts near Key West, appeared in sight. At the same time the Uni[10 more...]
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
the Charleston Mercury. On the 20th, in a speech at Louisville, he echoed the voice of the Journal of that city in its denunciation of the President's call for troops. See page 339. He advised Kentuckians to remain neutral, but in the event of their being driven from that position, he declared it to be their duty to espouse the cause of the conspirators for the conservation of Slavery. Bell, bolder or more honest, openly linked his fortunes with those of the Confederacy, in a speech at Nashville, on the 23d of April, in which he declared that Tennessee was virtually out of the Union, and urged the people of his State to prepare for vigorous war upon the Government. Nashville Banner. The Governor (Harris) was at the same time working with all his might in the manipulation of machinery to array Tennessee, as a State, against the National Government. In this he was aided by an address to the people by professed friends of the Union, who counseled them to decline joining either pa
Eufaula (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
e Raleigh Standard of the same date said:--Our streets are alive with soldiers (although North Carolina was a professedly loyal State of the Union), and added, Washington City will be too hot to hold Abraham Lincoln and his Government. North Carolina has said it, and she will do all she can to make good her declaration. The Wilmington (N. C.) Journal said:--When North Carolina regiments go to Washington, and they will go, they will stand side by side with their brethren of the South. The Eufaula (Alabama) Express said, on the 25th: April, 1861.--Our policy at this time should be to seize the old Federal Capital, and take old Lincoln arid his Cabinet prisoners of war. The Milledgeville (Georgia) Southern Recorder of the 30th, inspired by men like Toombs, Cobb, Iverson, and other leaders, said:--The Government of the Confederate States must possess the city of Washington. It is folly to think it can be used any longer as the Headquarters of the Lincoln Government, as no access can
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
, than that President Davis will soon march an army through North Carolina and Virginia to Washington, and it called upon Virginians who wished to join the Southern army, to organize at once. The first-fruits of Virginia secession, said the New Orleans Picayune South Carolina Light Infantry. of the 18th, will be the removal of Lincoln and his Cabinet, and whatever he can carry away, to the safer neighborhood of Harrisburg or Cincinnati — perhaps to Buffalo or Cleveland. The Vicksburg (Mississippi) Whig of the 20th said:--Major Ben. McCulloch has organized a force of five thousand men to seize the Federal Capital the instant the first blood is spilled. On the evening of the same day, when news of bloodshed in Baltimore was received in Montgomery, bonfires were built in front of the Exchange Hotel, and from its balcony Roger A. Pryor said, in a speech to the multitude, that he was in favor of an immediate march upon Washington. At the departure of the Second Regiment of South Caro
Harrisburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
39. Nothing is more probable, said the Richmond Enquirer on the 13th of April, than that President Davis will soon march an army through North Carolina and Virginia to Washington, and it called upon Virginians who wished to join the Southern army, to organize at once. The first-fruits of Virginia secession, said the New Orleans Picayune South Carolina Light Infantry. of the 18th, will be the removal of Lincoln and his Cabinet, and whatever he can carry away, to the safer neighborhood of Harrisburg or Cincinnati — perhaps to Buffalo or Cleveland. The Vicksburg (Mississippi) Whig of the 20th said:--Major Ben. McCulloch has organized a force of five thousand men to seize the Federal Capital the instant the first blood is spilled. On the evening of the same day, when news of bloodshed in Baltimore was received in Montgomery, bonfires were built in front of the Exchange Hotel, and from its balcony Roger A. Pryor said, in a speech to the multitude, that he was in favor of an immediate m
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