hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 893 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 752 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 742 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 656 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 411 1 Browse Search
Robert Anderson 367 7 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 330 2 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 330 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 268 0 Browse Search
Benjamin F. Butler 235 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,120 total hits in 275 results.

... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ...
Benjamin F. Watson (search for this): chapter 17
with boards, and casks of cement and huge stones. The iron plates intended for the new dome of the building were used for breastworks between the marble columns; and the pictures in the rotunda and the statuary were covered with heavy planking, to shield them from harm. While the fight between the Massachusetts Sixth The following is a list of the officers of the staff and the different companies:--Colonel, Edward F. Jones, Lowell; Lieutenant-Colonel, Walter Shattuck, Groton; Major, Benj. F. Watson, Lawrence; Adjutant, Alpha B. Farr, Lowell; Quartermaster, James Monroe, Cambridge; Paymaster, Rufus L. Plaisted, Lowell; Surgeon, Norman Smith, Groton; Chaplain, Charles Babbidge, Pepperell. Company A, Lowell, Captain, J. A. Sawtell; Company B, Groton, Captain, E. S. Clark; Company C, Lowell, Captain, A. S. Follansbee; Company D, Lowell, Captain, J. W. Hart; Company E, Acton, Captain, David Totter; Company F, Lawrence, Captain, B. F. Chadbourne; Company H, Lowell, Captain, Jona. L
Silas H. Stringham (search for this): chapter 17
was of maximum number, should be reduced to seventy-seven men to a company. No part of the regiment would go without the remainder, and, fortunately for the public good, General Wool took the responsibility of ordering them forward as a whole. They were escorted to the water by five thousand firemen. Troops and subsistence so promptly forwarded to Washington by the Union Defense Committee, under the direction of General Wool, and with the cordial co-operation of Commodores Breese and Stringham, saved the Capital from seizure. I remember how you sustained the Government by forwarding troops for the defense of the National Capital; how, by your zeal in equipping and sending forward, with the means at your disposal, large bodies of patriotic and excellent troops, which came in good time, the tide of rebellion, which commenced at Baltimore, was turned against the enemies of our country. The Government had not the means of defending itself, when they were most needed. This Comm
York Pennsylvania (search for this): chapter 17
ore for the North without a pass from the President of the Board of Police. approved by the Mayor; The following is a copy of one of the passes, now before me :-- office of Board of Police, Baltimore, April 22, 1861. Messrs. Edward Childe and P. H. Birkhead being about to proceed to the North upon their private business, and having Mrs. Steins brenner under their charge, we desire that they be allowed by all persons to pass without molestation by the way of Port Deposit, or York Pennsylvania, or otherwise, as they may see fit. By order of the Board Charles Howard, Pres't. The Mayor of the City concurs in the above. George Hunt brows. By his private Secretary, Robert D. Brown. Mr. F. Meredith Dryden will accompany the party. Charles Howard, President Board of Police. and these permissions were sparingly issued. Neither were the mails allowed to go North, for it was desirable to keep the people of the Free-labor States ignorant of affairs at Washington un
John J. Cisco (search for this): chapter 17
when a Committee of Safety was appointed. It was composed of some of the most distinguished citizens of New York, of all parties. They organized that evening, with the title of the Union defense Committee. The Committee was composed of the following citizens:--John A. Dix, Chairman; Simeon Draper, Vice-Chairman; William M. Evarts, Secretary; Theodore Dehon, Treasurer; Moses Taylor, Richard M. Blatchford, Edwards Pierrepont, Alexander T. Stewart, Samuel Sloane, John Jacob Astor, Jr., John J. Cisco, James S. Wadsworth, Isaac Bell, James Boorman, Charles H. Marshall, Robert H. McCurdy, Moses H. Grinnell, Royal Phelps, William E. Dodge, Greene C. Bronson, Hamilton Fish, William F. Havemeyer, Charles H. Russell, James T. Brady, Rudolph A. Witthaus, Abiel A. Low, Prosper M. Wetmore, A. C. Richards, and the Mayor, Controller, and Presidents of the two Boards of the Common Council of the City of New York. The Committee had rooms at No. 80 Pine Street, open all day, and at the Fifth Aven
Schoenleber (search for this): chapter 17
past eleven o'clock in the forenoon, in twelve passenger and several freight cars, the latter furnished with benches. The troops, about two thousand in all, were the Sixth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers, Colonel Jones, and ten companies of the Washington Brigade, of Philadelphia, under General William H. Small. Six of the ten companies were of the First Regiment, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Berry, and the other four were of the Second Regiment, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Schoenleber and Major Gullman. When the train reached the President Street Station, between which and the Camden Street or Washington Station the cars were drawn singly by horses, a mob of about five hundred men were waiting to receive them. These were soon joined by others, and the number was increased to at least two thousand before the cars were started. The mob followed with yells, groans, and horrid imprecations. Eight cars, containing a portion of the Massachusetts Regiment, pas
s from the time when the President made his call for troops, no less than eight thousand well-equipped and fully armed men had gone to the field from the city of New York. Already, before the organization of the Committee, the celebrated Seventh Regiment of the National Guard of New York, Colonel Marshall Lefferts, had left for Washington City; and on the day after the great meeting (Sunday, the 21st), three other regiments had followed, namely, the Sixth, Colonel Pinckney; the Twelfth, Colonel Butter-field; and the Seventy-first, Colonel Vosburg. Major-General Wool, next in rank to the General-in-chief, and the Commander of the Eastern Department, which comprised the whole country eastward of the Mississippi River, was then at his home and Headquarters at Troy, New York. When he heard of the affair at Baltimore, he hastened to Albany, the State capital, to confer with Governor Morgan. While he was there, the Governor received an electrograph, urging him to send troops forward to
Cleaveland (search for this): chapter 17
business was suspended. The bodies were received by a great concourse of citizens and six military companies just organized for the war, and escorted to Huntington Hall, which was draped in black. There funeral services were held, during which, the Rev. W. R. Clark, of the Methodist Church, preached an impressive sermon before the authorities of the city and the people ; All denominations engaged in the services. The Scriptures were read by the Rev. W. C. Himes, Episcopalian; the Rev. Dr. Cleaveland, Congregationalist, prayed; an original hymn was read by the Rev. J. J. Twiss, Universalist; the closing prayer was by the Rev. D. Mott, Baptist; and the benediction was pronounced by the Rev. F. Hinckley, Unitarian. Over the rostrum were displayed the words:--April 19, 1775; April 19, 1861. and then the two bodies were laid in a vault in the Lowell Cemetery. A little more than four years afterward, the remains of these first martyrs were laid beneath a beautiful monument of Concor
Frank P. Blair (search for this): chapter 17
the Belgians, two and a half inches above that of English recruits, and one and a half inches above that of the Scotch Highlanders. as they were preparing to pass over the Beautiful River into the Virginia border. They had heard the war-notes of Blair, and Morton, and Yates, and Randall, and Kirkwood, and Ramsay, all loyal Governors of the populous and puissant States of that great Northwest, and were satisfied that the people would respond as promptly as had those of New England; so they hastnt of ammunition, he directed him to send a judicious officer, with four or five companies, to take possession of the Arsenal at St. Louis, which he believed to be in danger of seizure by the secessionists of Missouri. He also telegraphed to Frank P. Blair, of St. Louis (afterward a major-general in the National Army), to assist in the matter. By judicious management, twenty-one thousand stand of small arms, two field-pieces, and one hundred and ten thousand rounds of ammunition were transferr
E. S. Clark (search for this): chapter 17
the fight between the Massachusetts Sixth The following is a list of the officers of the staff and the different companies:--Colonel, Edward F. Jones, Lowell; Lieutenant-Colonel, Walter Shattuck, Groton; Major, Benj. F. Watson, Lawrence; Adjutant, Alpha B. Farr, Lowell; Quartermaster, James Monroe, Cambridge; Paymaster, Rufus L. Plaisted, Lowell; Surgeon, Norman Smith, Groton; Chaplain, Charles Babbidge, Pepperell. Company A, Lowell, Captain, J. A. Sawtell; Company B, Groton, Captain, E. S. Clark; Company C, Lowell, Captain, A. S. Follansbee; Company D, Lowell, Captain, J. W. Hart; Company E, Acton, Captain, David Totter; Company F, Lawrence, Captain, B. F. Chadbourne; Company H, Lowell, Captain, Jona. Ladd; Company I, Lawrence, Captain, John Pickering. This regiment had been the recipient of the most marked attention all the way from Boston. They were greeted by crowds of cheering citizens everywhere; and when they left New York to cross the Jersey City Ferry, full fifteen t
Edward Childe (search for this): chapter 17
r's Ferry. Thus, all communication by railway or telegraph between the seat of government and the loyal States of the Union was absolutely cut off, or in the hands of the insurgents. For a few days succeeding the riot, no person was allowed to leave Baltimore for the North without a pass from the President of the Board of Police. approved by the Mayor; The following is a copy of one of the passes, now before me :-- office of Board of Police, Baltimore, April 22, 1861. Messrs. Edward Childe and P. H. Birkhead being about to proceed to the North upon their private business, and having Mrs. Steins brenner under their charge, we desire that they be allowed by all persons to pass without molestation by the way of Port Deposit, or York Pennsylvania, or otherwise, as they may see fit. By order of the Board Charles Howard, Pres't. The Mayor of the City concurs in the above. George Hunt brows. By his private Secretary, Robert D. Brown. Mr. F. Meredith Dryden w
... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ...