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Norman Smith (search for this): chapter 17
he marble columns; and the pictures in the rotunda and the statuary were covered with heavy planking, to shield them from harm. While the fight between the Massachusetts Sixth The following is a list of the officers of the staff and the different companies:--Colonel, Edward F. Jones, Lowell; Lieutenant-Colonel, Walter Shattuck, Groton; Major, Benj. F. Watson, Lawrence; Adjutant, Alpha B. Farr, Lowell; Quartermaster, James Monroe, Cambridge; Paymaster, Rufus L. Plaisted, Lowell; Surgeon, Norman Smith, Groton; Chaplain, Charles Babbidge, Pepperell. Company A, Lowell, Captain, J. A. Sawtell; Company B, Groton, Captain, E. S. Clark; Company C, Lowell, Captain, A. S. Follansbee; Company D, Lowell, Captain, J. W. Hart; Company E, Acton, Captain, David Totter; Company F, Lawrence, Captain, B. F. Chadbourne; Company H, Lowell, Captain, Jona. Ladd; Company I, Lawrence, Captain, John Pickering. This regiment had been the recipient of the most marked attention all the way from Boston.
of the Union was absolutely cut off, or in the hands of the insurgents. For a few days succeeding the riot, no person was allowed to leave Baltimore for the North without a pass from the President of the Board of Police. approved by the Mayor; The following is a copy of one of the passes, now before me :-- office of Board of Police, Baltimore, April 22, 1861. Messrs. Edward Childe and P. H. Birkhead being about to proceed to the North upon their private business, and having Mrs. Steins brenner under their charge, we desire that they be allowed by all persons to pass without molestation by the way of Port Deposit, or York Pennsylvania, or otherwise, as they may see fit. By order of the Board Charles Howard, Pres't. The Mayor of the City concurs in the above. George Hunt brows. By his private Secretary, Robert D. Brown. Mr. F. Meredith Dryden will accompany the party. Charles Howard, President Board of Police. and these permissions were sparingly issued
Charles Howard (search for this): chapter 17
, and having Mrs. Steins brenner under their charge, we desire that they be allowed by all persons to pass without molestation by the way of Port Deposit, or York Pennsylvania, or otherwise, as they may see fit. By order of the Board Charles Howard, Pres't. The Mayor of the City concurs in the above. George Hunt brows. By his private Secretary, Robert D. Brown. Mr. F. Meredith Dryden will accompany the party. Charles Howard, President Board of Police. and these permissions weCharles Howard, President Board of Police. and these permissions were sparingly issued. Neither were the mails allowed to go North, for it was desirable to keep the people of the Free-labor States ignorant of affairs at Washington until the seizure of the Capital, by the insurgents, should be accomplished. The first mail-bag that passed through Baltimore after the riot there. was carried by James D. Gay, a member of the Ringgold Artillery from Reading, already mentioned. He left Washington for home on the evening of the 19th of April. with a carpet-bag fu
Abiel A. Low (search for this): chapter 17
-John A. Dix, Chairman; Simeon Draper, Vice-Chairman; William M. Evarts, Secretary; Theodore Dehon, Treasurer; Moses Taylor, Richard M. Blatchford, Edwards Pierrepont, Alexander T. Stewart, Samuel Sloane, John Jacob Astor, Jr., John J. Cisco, James S. Wadsworth, Isaac Bell, James Boorman, Charles H. Marshall, Robert H. McCurdy, Moses H. Grinnell, Royal Phelps, William E. Dodge, Greene C. Bronson, Hamilton Fish, William F. Havemeyer, Charles H. Russell, James T. Brady, Rudolph A. Witthaus, Abiel A. Low, Prosper M. Wetmore, A. C. Richards, and the Mayor, Controller, and Presidents of the two Boards of the Common Council of the City of New York. The Committee had rooms at No. 80 Pine Street, open all day, and at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, open in the evening. The original and specific duties assigned to the Committee, by the great meeting that created it, were, to represent the citizens in the collection of funds, and the transaction of such other business, in aid of the movements of the G
accept my most earnest wishes for the continuance of your happiness and prosperity, and believe me, most truly yours, R . E. Lee. Lieutenant-General Winfield Scott, Commanding, United States Army. At that time, according to the correspondent of the Charleston Mercury, Lee knew that he was to be the General-in-chief of the Virginia forces, and had necessarily resolved to draw his sword not only in defense of his native State, but against the National Government, whenever the conspirators shoe National Observatory, See note 3, page 894. Governor Letcher, and others who were present, joined in the reception of Lee, standing. He was then greeted by the President, who made a brief speech, in which he announced to the Colonel that the C which the recipient replied in a few words, accepting the so-called honor. Richmond Enquirer, April 24, 1861. In time, Lee became the General-in-chief of all the armies in rebellion against his Government, at whose expense he had been educated,
James Monroe (search for this): chapter 17
tended for the new dome of the building were used for breastworks between the marble columns; and the pictures in the rotunda and the statuary were covered with heavy planking, to shield them from harm. While the fight between the Massachusetts Sixth The following is a list of the officers of the staff and the different companies:--Colonel, Edward F. Jones, Lowell; Lieutenant-Colonel, Walter Shattuck, Groton; Major, Benj. F. Watson, Lawrence; Adjutant, Alpha B. Farr, Lowell; Quartermaster, James Monroe, Cambridge; Paymaster, Rufus L. Plaisted, Lowell; Surgeon, Norman Smith, Groton; Chaplain, Charles Babbidge, Pepperell. Company A, Lowell, Captain, J. A. Sawtell; Company B, Groton, Captain, E. S. Clark; Company C, Lowell, Captain, A. S. Follansbee; Company D, Lowell, Captain, J. W. Hart; Company E, Acton, Captain, David Totter; Company F, Lawrence, Captain, B. F. Chadbourne; Company H, Lowell, Captain, Jona. Ladd; Company I, Lawrence, Captain, John Pickering. This regiment h
F. J. Dreer (search for this): chapter 17
, the founder of Arlington House (Mr. Custis) was yet alive. He was there just before the serpent of secession beguiled the later master. It was his ideal of a home that should make the possessor grateful for the blessings, political and social, that flow from our beneficent Government, under which all rights are fully secured to every citizen. War came and wrought great changes in the relations of men and things. The writer visited Arlington House again with two traveling companions (F. J. Dreer and Edwin Greble, of Philadelphia), not as a guest, but as an observer of events that sadden his heart while he makes the record. It was just before sunset on a beautiful day in early May, 1865, when the possessor of Arlington The Arlington estate was not the actual property of Colonel Lee. The late Mr. Custis, by his Will, left it to his daughter, Mrs. Lee, during her life, when it was to become the property of her eldest son, who also became a general in the army in rebellion again
William E. Dodge (search for this): chapter 17
organized that evening, with the title of the Union defense Committee. The Committee was composed of the following citizens:--John A. Dix, Chairman; Simeon Draper, Vice-Chairman; William M. Evarts, Secretary; Theodore Dehon, Treasurer; Moses Taylor, Richard M. Blatchford, Edwards Pierrepont, Alexander T. Stewart, Samuel Sloane, John Jacob Astor, Jr., John J. Cisco, James S. Wadsworth, Isaac Bell, James Boorman, Charles H. Marshall, Robert H. McCurdy, Moses H. Grinnell, Royal Phelps, William E. Dodge, Greene C. Bronson, Hamilton Fish, William F. Havemeyer, Charles H. Russell, James T. Brady, Rudolph A. Witthaus, Abiel A. Low, Prosper M. Wetmore, A. C. Richards, and the Mayor, Controller, and Presidents of the two Boards of the Common Council of the City of New York. The Committee had rooms at No. 80 Pine Street, open all day, and at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, open in the evening. The original and specific duties assigned to the Committee, by the great meeting that created it, were, t
Robert Edmund Lee (search for this): chapter 17
t and Baltimore Emibassies defection of Army officers, 420. resignation of Colonel Lee 421. his inducements to be loyal, 422. Arlington House and its Surroundings, who were unfaithful. Among those who resigned at this time was Colonel Robert Edmund Lee, of Virginia, an accomplished engineer officer, and one of the most tWashington Parke Custis, the adopted son of Washington, and father-in-law of Colonel Lee, was drawn by the author in 1860. Georgetown, he proffered the resignatommission in terms of well-feigned reluctance. The following is a copy of Colonel Lee's letter to General Scott:-- Arlington House, April 20, 1861. Genera June, 1825. No man had stronger inducements to be a loyal citizen than Robert E. Lee. His ties of consanguinity and association with the founders of the Republ tale of unutterable suffering vainly pleading in mute eloquence for mercy, Robert E. Lee might have looked any hour of the day with his field-glass from the rear ga
T. Parkins Scott (search for this): chapter 17
liam Burns, held a meeting in Monument Square. T. Parkins Scott presided. He and others addressed a multitudeants. Already the Capitol had been fortified by General Scott. The doors and windows were barricaded with boas were given for Bunker Hill, Old Massachusetts, General Scott, and Major Anderson, as the regiment went up Walr on the morning of the 20th. The President and General Scott had already been in consultation on the subject t ten o'clock in the morning. At that interview General Scott proposed to bring troops by water to Annapolis, ediately returned to the President, who summoned General Scott and some of the members of the Cabinet to a confille should be sent back to York or Harrisburg. General Scott, said the Mayor in his report, adopted the Presitate; and, on the 20th, in a letter addressed to General Scott, from his beautiful seat of Arlington House, on e following is a copy of Colonel Lee's letter to General Scott:-- Arlington House, April 20, 1861. Gene
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