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John A. Dix (search for this): chapter 17
amed purpose, at the rooms of the Chamber of Commerce, corner of William and Cedar Streets. The arrangements were made, and the great meeting at Union Square, already mentioned, See page 854. was held on the 20th of April, when a Committee of Safety was appointed. It was composed of some of the most distinguished citizens of New York, of all parties. They organized that evening, with the title of the Union defense Committee. The Committee was composed of the following citizens:--John A. Dix, Chairman; Simeon Draper, Vice-Chairman; William M. Evarts, Secretary; Theodore Dehon, Treasurer; Moses Taylor, Richard M. Blatchford, Edwards Pierrepont, Alexander T. Stewart, Samuel Sloane, John Jacob Astor, Jr., John J. Cisco, James S. Wadsworth, Isaac Bell, James Boorman, Charles H. Marshall, Robert H. McCurdy, Moses H. Grinnell, Royal Phelps, William E. Dodge, Greene C. Bronson, Hamilton Fish, William F. Havemeyer, Charles H. Russell, James T. Brady, Rudolph A. Witthaus, Abiel A. Low
Casius M. Clay (search for this): chapter 17
was the hall in which the Peace Convention assembled a few weeks before. See page 236. that evening. A large number assembled at the appointed hour. They took a solemn oath of fidelity to the old flag, and signed a pledge to do every thing in their power in defense of the Capital, and to be ready for action at a moment's warning, when called by General Scott. Cassius M. Clay, the distinguished Kentuckian, was among them. He was appointed their leader, and thus was formed the notable Casius M. Clay Battalion, composed of some of the noblest and most distinguished men in the country, in honor, wealth, and social position. They chose efficient officers; and all that night they patroled the streets of the city to guard against incendiaries, and prevent the Cassius M. Clay. assembling of the secessionists. Another party, commanded by General Lane, of Kansas, went quietly to the White House --the Presidential mansion — to act as a body-guard to his Excellency. They made the great
David E. Twiggs (search for this): chapter 17
aid Amen! Neither Governor Hicks, nor the Mayor of Baltimore, nor the clergy nor laity of the churches there, ever afterward troubled the President with advice so evidently emanating from the implacable enemies of the Union. The National Capital and the National Government were in great peril, as we have observed, at this critical juncture. The regular Army, weak in numbers before the insurrection, was now utterly inadequate to perform its duties as the right arm of the nation's power. Twiggs's treason in Texas had greatly diminished its available force, and large numbers of its officers, especially of those born in Slave-labor States, were resigning their commissions, abandoning their flag, and joining the enemies of their country. Notwithstanding a greater number of those who abandoned their flag and joined the insurgents at that time were from the Slave-labor States, a large number of officers from those States remained faithful. From a carefully prepared statement made by
John Jones (search for this): chapter 17
treet Station at twenty minutes past eleven o'clock in the forenoon, in twelve passenger and several freight cars, the latter furnished with benches. The troops, about two thousand in all, were the Sixth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers, Colonel Jones, and ten companies of the Washington Brigade, of Philadelphia, under General William H. Small. Six of the ten companies were of the First Regiment, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Berry, and the other four were of the Second Regimey were met by another crowd, who had been collecting all the morning. These hooted and yelled at the soldiers as they were transferred to the Baltimore and Ohio Railway cars, and threw some stones and bricks. One of these struck and bruised Colonel Jones, who was superintending the transfer. The mob on Pratt Street, near the head of the Basin, became more furious every moment; and when the ninth car reached Gay Street, and there was a brief halt on account of a deranged brake, they could n
Cassius M. Clay (search for this): chapter 17
2. Arlington House and its Surroundings designs against Washington City, 423. preparations to defend the Capital--Cassius M. Clay Guard, 424. the massacre in Baltimore the martyrs on that occasion honored, 426. their funeral and Monument, 427.eir power in defense of the Capital, and to be ready for action at a moment's warning, when called by General Scott. Cassius M. Clay, the distinguished Kentuckian, was among them. He was appointed their leader, and thus was formed the notable Casiu officers; and all that night they patroled the streets of the city to guard against incendiaries, and prevent the Cassius M. Clay. assembling of the secessionists. Another party, commanded by General Lane, of Kansas, went quietly to the White Hmen of Maryland and the secessionists of Washington were barely restrained from action by the Pennsylvanians and the Cassius M. Clay Battalion, until the speedy arrival of other troops from the North gave absolute present security to the Government.
George P. Kane (search for this): chapter 17
lding. There, it is said, the Chief of Police, Kane, and the President of the Monument Square meetiight. At this juncture, and at this place, Marshal Kane appears for the first time in the history oable evidence of it. On the same evening, Marshal Kane received an offer of troops from Bradley Joafterward a brigadier in the Confederate Army. Kane telegraphed back, saying :--Thank you for your ight I received the following dispatch from Marshal Kane, of Baltimore, by telegraph to the Junction and expressed to Frederick. [Here follows Kane's dispatch given in the text.] All men who will go s in the house No. 34 Holliday Street, opposite Kane's office in the old City Hall. Governor Hick to bed. Their slumbers were soon broken by Marshal Kane and Ex-Governor Lowe, who came at midnight e of Maryland, May 11, 1861, by Governor Hicks. Kane said that he had received information by telegrlied. The same. With this alleged authority, Kane and Lowe, accompanied by Mayor Brown and his br
Thomas J. Morris (search for this): chapter 17
bolishing Slavery, by act of the Maryland General Assembly, February 8, 1865. for the perpetuation of which they had taken up arms. And more. At the conclusion of the consecrating ceremonies at the tomb of the young martyrs in Lowell, Lieutenant-Colonel Morris Martyrs' Monument. the Monument is of Concord granite, and its entire hight twenty-seven feet six inches. The plan is cruciform, the larger arms measuring fifteen feet, and the shorter, twelve feet. It consists of a central shaft pnument was dedicated on the 17th of June, 1865, with imposing ceremonies by the Masonic fraternity, a large number of military companies, and citizens, and the Otto (singing) Club. Governor Andrew delivered an oration, after which Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas J. Morris presented the Maryland flag mentioned in the text. There was a collation at Huntington Hall, where toasts were given and speeches made. Among the speakers was Major-General Butler, whose military experience in Maryland, just afte
Samuel Sloane (search for this): chapter 17
e 854. was held on the 20th of April, when a Committee of Safety was appointed. It was composed of some of the most distinguished citizens of New York, of all parties. They organized that evening, with the title of the Union defense Committee. The Committee was composed of the following citizens:--John A. Dix, Chairman; Simeon Draper, Vice-Chairman; William M. Evarts, Secretary; Theodore Dehon, Treasurer; Moses Taylor, Richard M. Blatchford, Edwards Pierrepont, Alexander T. Stewart, Samuel Sloane, John Jacob Astor, Jr., John J. Cisco, James S. Wadsworth, Isaac Bell, James Boorman, Charles H. Marshall, Robert H. McCurdy, Moses H. Grinnell, Royal Phelps, William E. Dodge, Greene C. Bronson, Hamilton Fish, William F. Havemeyer, Charles H. Russell, James T. Brady, Rudolph A. Witthaus, Abiel A. Low, Prosper M. Wetmore, A. C. Richards, and the Mayor, Controller, and Presidents of the two Boards of the Common Council of the City of New York. The Committee had rooms at No. 80 Pine Stree
e city from Philadelphia. These arrived at the President Street Station at twenty minutes past eleven o'clock in the forenoon, in twelve passenger and several freight cars, the latter furnished with benches. The troops, about two thousand in all, were the Sixth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers, Colonel Jones, and ten companies of the Washington Brigade, of Philadelphia, under General William H. Small. Six of the ten companies were of the First Regiment, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Berry, and the other four were of the Second Regiment, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Schoenleber and Major Gullman. When the train reached the President Street Station, between which and the Camden Street or Washington Station the cars were drawn singly by horses, a mob of about five hundred men were waiting to receive them. These were soon joined by others, and the number was increased to at least two thousand before the cars were started. The mob followed with yells, groans, and
Lenox Bond (search for this): chapter 17
ting themselves at half-past 10 o'clock, so as to go down in the half-past 11 train. calling upon the secessionists to rally to his standard. Many came, and with them he hastened to Baltimore, April 20, 1861. and made his Headquarters in the house No. 34 Holliday Street, opposite Kane's office in the old City Hall. Governor Hicks passed the night of the 19th at the house of Mayor Brown. At eleven o'clock the Mayor, with the concurrence of the Governor, sent a committee, consisting of Lenox Bond, George W. Dobbin, and John C. Brune, to President Lincoln, with a letter, in which he assured the chief magistrate that the people of Baltimore were exasperated to the highest degree by the passage of troops, and that the citizens were universally decided in the opinion that no more should be ordered to come. But for the exertions of the authorities, he said, a fearful slaughter would have occurred that day; and he conceived it to be his solemn duty, under the circumstances, to inform th
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