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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. Search the whole document.

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Charles Wilkes (search for this): chapter 21
Smith wrote the name. A writer in the Historical Magazine (iii. 347) says, that on earlier maps of Virginia, which he has seen, he finds the point called Newport Neuse, which, he argues, is only another way of spelling Newce, and that the name given is a compound of the name of the celebrated navigator and the Virginia marshal, namely, Newport-Newce. This compounding of words in naming places was then common in England, and became so in this country, as Randolph-Macon, Hampton-Sidney, and Wilkes-Barre. In Captain Smith's map of Virginia, the place is called Point Hope. That map was made after the alleged discovery of Newport with his-supplies. Believing that the name was originally a compound of those of Captain Newport and Marshal Newce, the author of this work adopts the orthography given in the text-Newport — Newce. They found the white inhabitants in sullen mood, but the negroes were jubilant, for they regarded the troops as their expected deliverers. Colonel Phelps did not
Hubbard Winslow (search for this): chapter 21
Duryee's Zouaves was assigned the duty of leading in the attack. Skirmishers, under Captains Kilpatrick, Bartlett, and Winslow, and all under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel G. K. Warren, of the Zouaves (who was acquainted with the ground), wereft flank and rear. Greble, in the mean time, kept his position in the road on their front. Kilpatrick, Bartlett, and Winslow charged boldly on the front of the foe, while Captain Denike and Lieutenant Duryee (son of the Colonel) and some of Town Shea, Ll. D., page 41. Kilpatrick, who was badly wounded by a shot through his thigh, was rescued and borne away by Captain Winslow. In his report, Kilpatrick said, after speaking of the engagement, and of a number of men being killed:--Having rer, and killed a soldier in the rear, I withdrew my men to the skirts of the wood. . . . I shall ever be grateful to Captain Winslow, who rescued me after our forces had left. The insurgent cavalry pursued about six miles, when they returned; and
Theodore Winthrop (search for this): chapter 21
506. battle at Big Bethel, 507. death of Major Winthrop, 508. death of Lieutenant Greble, 509. efive broad acres within the walls Major Theodore Winthrop, in the Atlantic Monthly.--had kept tepigram, prophetically wrote the brilliant Major Winthrop, of Butler's staff, who fell in battle a fUnion pickets. J. Bankhead Magruder. Major Winthrop, Butler's aid and military secretary, whos from the latter place. With Scott as guide, Winthrop reconnoitered these positions, and was satisfarming a black man in this war came from Theodore Winthrop. George Scott had a shooting-iron. In one of his last letters to a friend, Winthrop wrote:--If I come back safe, I will send you my notes attery in front of this assaulting party. Major Winthrop was with the Newport-Newce troops at this ceased to live. So, too, will the memory of Winthrop, the gentle, the brilliant, and the brave, beff the body of Lieutenant Greble, but that of Winthrop remained for a time with the insurgents. T[4 more...]
Henry A. Wise (search for this): chapter 21
and a half of ramparts--three hundred to protect some sixty-five broad acres within the walls Major Theodore Winthrop, in the Atlantic Monthly.--had kept the insurgents at bay. He had quietly but significantly turned the muzzles of some of his great guns landward; and, unheeding the mad cry of the politicians, that it was an act of war, and the threats of rebellious men in arms, of punishment for his insolence, he defied the enemies of his country. Those guns taught Letcher prudence, and Wise caution, and Lee circumspection, and Jefferson Davis respectful consideration. The immense importance of the post was Fortress Monroe in 1861. this was the most extensive military work in the country. It was commenced in 1819, and was completed at a cost of two millions five hundred thousand dollars. It was named in honor of President Monroe. Its walls, faced with heavy blocks of granite, are thirty-five feet in thickness, and casemated below. It is entirely surrounded by a deep moat
t (erected, as we have observed, by order of General Butler, at the eastern end of Hampton Bridge), including a view of the desolated town. Near the bridge, on that side of the creek, were the summer residences of several wealthy men, then occupied for public uses. That in which Doctor McClellan resided belonged to Mallory, the so-called Confederate Secretary of the Navy. A little below it was the house of Ex-President Tyler; and near it the spacious and more ancient looking mansion of Doctor Woods, who was then with the enemies of the Government, in which several Quaker women, from Philadelphia, had established an Orphan's Home for colored children. Tyler's residence was the home of several of the teachers of the children of freedmen, and others engaged in benevolent work. John Tyler's summer residence. On our return to Fortress Monroe in the evening, we received orders to go on board the Ben, Deford, a stanch ocean steamer which was to be General Butler's Headquarters in
this theory, but furnishes a better. In 1619 Governor Yeardley established a representative government in Virginia, with simple machinery, and laid the political foundations of that State. This government was strengthened by his successor, Governor Wyatt, under whom were proper civil officers. In instructions to Wyatt occurs the following sentence:--George Sandis is appointed Treasurer, and he is to put into execution all orders of Court about staple commodities; to the Marshal, Sir William Wyatt occurs the following sentence:--George Sandis is appointed Treasurer, and he is to put into execution all orders of Court about staple commodities; to the Marshal, Sir William Newce, the same. This settles the point that there was a leading man in Virginia at that time named Newce--Captain Nuse, as Captain Smith wrote the name. A writer in the Historical Magazine (iii. 347) says, that on earlier maps of Virginia, which he has seen, he finds the point called Newport Neuse, which, he argues, is only another way of spelling Newce, and that the name given is a compound of the name of the celebrated navigator and the Virginia marshal, namely, Newport-Newce. This compo
n and considerable research concerning the true orthography of this locality and the origin of its name. The commonly received explanation is that, at one time, when the English colony at Jamestown was in a starving condition, the supply ships of Captain Newport were first seen off this point, and gave the beholders the good news of food at hand; hence the place was called Newport's News. History does not seem to warrant the acceptance of this theory, but furnishes a better. In 1619 Governor Yeardley established a representative government in Virginia, with simple machinery, and laid the political foundations of that State. This government was strengthened by his successor, Governor Wyatt, under whom were proper civil officers. In instructions to Wyatt occurs the following sentence:--George Sandis is appointed Treasurer, and he is to put into execution all orders of Court about staple commodities; to the Marshal, Sir William Newce, the same. This settles the point that there was
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