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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2..

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ds and other places of interest connected with the Civil War. This could not be done within the Confederate lines during the war, and it was difficult to do so in many places for several months after the conflict had ceased. As much as possible of this labor was accomplished before the completion of the first volume, in which the events of the conflict, civil and military, to the close of the first battle of Bull's. Run, are recorded. After the first volume was completed, in the spring of 1866, the writer made a journey of several thousand miles in visiting the historical localities within the bounds of the Confederacy, observing the topography of battle-fields and the region of the movements of the great armies, making sketches, conversing with actors in the scenes, procuring documents, and in every possible way gathering valuable materials for the work. The writer bore a cordial letter of introduction from General Grant to any officer commanding a military post within the late S
Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 1
rded. After the first volume was completed, in the spring of 1866, the writer made a journey of several thousand miles in visiting the historical localities within the bounds of the Confederacy, observing the topography of battle-fields and the region of the movements of the great armies, making sketches, conversing with actors in the scenes, procuring documents, and in every possible way gathering valuable materials for the work. The writer bore a cordial letter of introduction from General Grant to any officer commanding a military post within the late Slave-labor States, asking him to afford the bearer every facility in his power. To General O. O. Howard the writer was also indebted, for a similar letter, directed to any agent of the Freedmen's Bureau. These, and the kind services everywhere proffered by, and received from, persons who had been in the Confederate armies, procured for the author extraordinary facilities for gathering historical materials, and he was enabled to
O. O. Howard (search for this): chapter 1
within the bounds of the Confederacy, observing the topography of battle-fields and the region of the movements of the great armies, making sketches, conversing with actors in the scenes, procuring documents, and in every possible way gathering valuable materials for the work. The writer bore a cordial letter of introduction from General Grant to any officer commanding a military post within the late Slave-labor States, asking him to afford the bearer every facility in his power. To General O. O. Howard the writer was also indebted, for a similar letter, directed to any agent of the Freedmen's Bureau. These, and the kind services everywhere proffered by, and received from, persons who had been in the Confederate armies, procured for the author extraordinary facilities for gathering historical materials, and he was enabled to send and bring home a large amount of valuable matter. This had to be carefully examined and collated. In this and kindred labor, and in the construction of s
Dover Plains, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ering valuable materials for the work. The writer bore a cordial letter of introduction from General Grant to any officer commanding a military post within the late Slave-labor States, asking him to afford the bearer every facility in his power. To General O. O. Howard the writer was also indebted, for a similar letter, directed to any agent of the Freedmen's Bureau. These, and the kind services everywhere proffered by, and received from, persons who had been in the Confederate armies, procured for the author extraordinary facilities for gathering historical materials, and he was enabled to send and bring home a large amount of valuable matter. This had to be carefully examined and collated. In this and kindred labor, and in the construction of small illustrative maps, and the preparation of the sketches for the engraver, all by his own hands, months were consumed, and the delay in the appearance of the second volume was the consequence. B. J. L. The Ridge, Dover Plains, N. Y.
picture of the situation of the Republic and of the relative character of the contending parties, much exaggerated, which was presented to Europe in the month of August. 1861. The first account of the battle, the panic that seized some of the National troops, and the confused flight of soldiers and civilians back to Washington, nassas. For weeks afterward this state of things continued, and it was impossible for the army to move forward with safety, under such circumstances. Late in August, Johnston wrote to Beauregard: It is impossible, as the affairs of the commissariat are now managed, to think of any other military course than a strictly defensiounter an enormous immediate evil. Its enforcement gradually declined, and it became almost a dead letter during the later period of the war. At the close of August, Congress and the chief council of the conspirators at Richmond had each finished its session, and both parties to the contest were preparing to put forth their u
unced the creation of a Geographical Division, formed of the Departments of Washington and of Northeastern Virginia, under the young chieftain, with headquarters at Washington City. Other changes had already been determined upon. On the 19th, July. an order was issued from the War Department for the honorable discharge from the service of Major-General Robert Patterson, on the 27th, when his term of duty would expire; and General N. P. Banks, then in command at Baltimore, was directed to tahem. At no time was the Capital in danger from external foes. The work of organization was performed with such energy, that in the place of a raw and disorganized army of about fifty thousand men, in and around Washington City, at the close of July 1861. there was, at the end of fifty dayso, a force of at least one hundred thousand men, well organized and offered, equipped and disciplined. Of these, full seventy-five thousand were then in a condition to be placed in column for active opera
r levying a tax on the excess of all incomes above eight hundred dollars; but Mr. Chase's suggestion concerning excise duties, and other taxes on special articles of personal property, legacies, &c., were not adopted at that time. Indeed, this system of taxation was not put in operation until after it was modified at the next session of Congress; for the President, who was invested with power to appoint officers to carry it out, was not allowed by the act to exercise it until the following February. It was estimated by the Secretary of the Treasury, that the real and personal values in the United States, at that time, reached the vast aggregate of $16,000,000,000, of which $11,000,000,000 were in the loyal States. It was also estimated that the yearly surplus earnings of the loyal people amounted to over $400,000,000. In the month of September, Mr. Chase sent forth a patriotic appeal to the people, in behalf of the subscription to the authorized loan. The war, said Mr. Chas
onsiderable Map showing the defenses of Washington. eminence in the vicinity of the National Capital was crowned with a fort or redoubt well mounted. Early in the following year the number of these works was fifty-two, whose names and locations are indicated on the accompanying map. According to General Orders issued by McClellan on the 30th of September, 1861, in which the names and locations of these forts were designated, thirty-two of them were then completed. At the beginning of December forty-eight were finished. This system of works was so complete, that at no time afterward, duing the war did the Confederates ever seriously attempt to assail them. At no time was the Capital in danger from external foes. The work of organization was performed with such energy, that in the place of a raw and disorganized army of about fifty thousand men, in and around Washington City, at the close of July 1861. there was, at the end of fifty dayso, a force of at least one hundred thou
ck spot, in the picture. This letter, and a visit from General Crittenden (who felt sensitive on this point), brought one from Benjamin December 22. to the a t Knoxville, indicating his wish that Brownlow should be sent out of the Confederacy, and regretting the circumstances of his arrest and imprisonment; only, as he said, because color is given to the suspicion that he has been entrapped. He was finally released and sent to Nashville (then in possession of National troops) early in March. Dr. Brownlow was a type of the Loyalists of the mountain regions of that State, who suffered terribly during a great portion of the war. A minute record of the faithful and fearless patriotism of the people of East Tennessee during the struggle, and the cruel wrongs and sufferings which they endured a greater portion of that time, would make one of the most glorious and yet revolting chapters in the history of the late fierce conflict. Incidents of that patriotism and suffering will be obs
of the situation of the Republic and of the relative character of the contending parties, much exaggerated, which was presented to Europe in the month of August. 1861. The first account of the battle, the panic that seized some of the National troops, and the confused flight of soldiers and civilians back to Washington, was give was performed with such energy, that in the place of a raw and disorganized army of about fifty thousand men, in and around Washington City, at the close of July 1861. there was, at the end of fifty dayso, a force of at least one hundred thousand men, well organized and offered, equipped and disciplined. Of these, full seventy-filled with loyalists, and an extensive disarming of the people was accomplished. So thoroughly were they under the control of the Confederates, that in November 1861. Colonel Wood was able to write to Benjamin, at Richmond, The rebellion [resistance to Confederate outrages] in East Tennessee has been put down in some of the cou
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