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Cane Creek (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Dr. Woodward, pages 297 to 801, inclusive. The events of the past few days had given great encouragement to both officers and men. The affair at Dug Springs impressed General McCulloch (a part of whose column it was that had been so smitten there) with the importance of great circumspection, and, after consultation with some of his officers, he fell back, and moving westward, formed a junction with the weaker force under Price, then advancing from Sarcoxie. Information reached them at Cane Creek that Lyon's force was immensely superior, and McCulloch counseled a retrograde movement. Price entertained a different opinion, and favored an immediate advance. His officers agreed with him, and he asked McCulloch to loan him arms, that his destitute Missouri soldiers, who were willing to fight, might be allowed to do so. McCulloch refused. So the matter stood, when, on the same evening, August 4, 1861. an order was received by McCulloch, from Major-General Polk, See page 540, volu
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
une, 1861. bringing with him an assortment of arms for his Government, and on the 6th of July he was appointed to the important command in the West just mentioned. The Western Department was created on the 6th of July, and comprised the State of Illinois, and the States and Territories west of the Mississippi and east of the Rocky Mountains, including New Mexico. Headquarters at St. Louis. He remained a short time in New York,. where he made arrangements for over twenty thousand stand of aption had its desired effect. Cairo was re-enforced without opposition. Other points were strengthened. Pillow, who had advanced some troops, and, with Thompson, was preparing to seize Cape Girardeau, Bird's Point, and Cairo, and overrun Southern Illinois, fell back, and became very discreet in action; and Hardee, with his independent command, was checked in his movements into the interior of Missouri. Pillow, notwithstanding he had about twenty thousand troops at his command, alarmed by
Randolphs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
constructed at several places on the Mississippi, in the form seen in the annexed engraving, being held by chains, attached to anchors, passing over them lengthwise. They were inefficient, and were soon abandoned. Spear's torpedo.--A, bow of torpedo vessel. B, torpedo. C C, tube filled with gunpowder, supported by a strong framework, to which the torpedo Raft anchored in the Mississippi. is attached. D, end of tube to which the match is applied. Polk was then gathering strength at Randolph and Fort Pillow, on the Tennessee side of the Mississippi. He had prohibited all steamboats from going above New Madrid, had pressed into the service several Cincinnati pilots, and had ordered up two gunboats from New Orleans, to operate between New Madrid and Cairo. Autograph letter of Leonidas Polk to Gideon J. Pillow, dated at Memphis, August 5th, 1861. Fremont returned to St. Louis on the 4th of August, having accomplished the immediate objects of his undertaking. He had spread
Meadow Mills (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
informed (but incorrectly), had been fighting with the Confederates on the banks of the Little Osage. Sigel's march from Sarcoxie had just commenced, when a scout brought him word that Price had fled from Pool's Prairie to Elk Mills, thirty miles south of Neosho. He at once turned his attention to the troops north of him, who he supposed were endeavoring to make their way into Arkansas.. He sent forward a detachment of two companies, under Captain Grone, with two field-pieces, toward Cedar Creek and Grand Falls, on the Neosho, to occupy a road in this supposed route of the Confederates, and to gain information, while he pushed on with the remainder of his command to Neosho, receiving greetings of welcome from the inhabitants on the way, who had been pillaged by the insurgents. He had already summoned Colonel Salomon, with his Missouri battalion, to join him at Neosho, and with this addition to his force, he went forward to meet his foe, leaving a single rifle company, under Capt
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
of newspapers charged with disloyalty was suspended. Morning Herald, Evening Missourian, and War Bulletin. So tight was held the curb of restraint in the city that an outbreak was prevented. More free to act in the rural districts, the armed secessionists began again to distress the loyal people. In bands they moved over the country, plundering and destroying. Almost daily, collisions between them and the Home Guards occurred. One of the most severe of these conflicts took place at Charleston, west of Bird's Point, on the 19th, August. when three hundred Illinois Volunteers, under Colonel Dougherty, put twelve hundred Confederates to flight. Two days afterward, a battery planted by Thompson, at Commerce, was captured by National troops sent out from Cape Girardeau; and everywhere the loyalists were successful in this sort of warfare. But the condition of public affairs in Missouri was becoming daily more alarming. The provisional government was almost powerless, and Governo
National (Nevada, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
en deceived by this stratagem. In this case the Confederates came, having an appearance exactly like Sigel's men, and the battery with which they announced their true character was composed of Sigel's captured guns! Their voice was the signal for a renewal of the conflict, and they were speedily silenced by Dubois, supported by Osterhaus and a remnant of the First Missouri. The battle raged fiercely for a time. Totten's Battery, supported by Iowa and Regular troops, in the center of the National line, was the special object of attack. The two armies were sometimes within a few feet of each other, and faces were scorched by the flash of a foeman's gun. The Union column stood like a rock in the midst of turbulent waves, dashing them into foam. Its opponents were vastly its superior in numbers. At length its line, pressed by an enormous weight, began to bend. At that critical moment Captain Granger dashed forward from the rear with the support of Dubois's Battery, consisting of po
Stone County (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
s fell among and scattered them in great disorder, for their frightened horses became unmanageable. The whole column of the Confederates now withdrew, leaving the valley in possession of the National troops. Thus ended the battle of Dug Springs. Lyon's loss was eight men killed and thirty wounded, and that of the Confederates was about forty killed and as many wounded. The Nationals moved forward the next morning in search of foes, but were disappointed. They encamped at Curran, in Stone County, twenty-six miles from Springfield, and remained in that vicinity until the next day, when General Lyon called a council of officers, The officers called into the council were Brigadier-General Sweeney, Colonel Sigel, Majors Schofield, Shepherd, Conant, and Sturgis, and Captains Totten and Schaeffer. and it was determined to return to Springfield. The army moved in that direction on the following morning, August 4, 1861. and reached Springfield on the 6th. Correspondence of the Ne
Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
th his, troops at New Madrid, at near the close of July. His first order issued there was on the 28th, prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors to his soldiers. He had suggested this movement into Missouri at an early period, as one of vast importance in his plans for seizing Bird's Point and Cairo. Whilst engaged in strongly fortifying Memphis, Randolph, and one or two other points on the Tennessee shore of the Mississippi, he earnestly recommended the occupation of New Madrid and Island No.10 by his troops, and the erection of strong fortifications there, for the twofold purpose of making New Madrid his base of operations against Bird's Point and Cairo, and of preventing armed vessels descending the river, it being evident early in June that preparations were being made for that purpose. At the middle of June he was ready to move forward, and only awaited a compliance of Governor Harris, with a requisition of Pillow for additional troops from Middle Tennessee. The threatenin
Grand Falls (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
correctly), had been fighting with the Confederates on the banks of the Little Osage. Sigel's march from Sarcoxie had just commenced, when a scout brought him word that Price had fled from Pool's Prairie to Elk Mills, thirty miles south of Neosho. He at once turned his attention to the troops north of him, who he supposed were endeavoring to make their way into Arkansas.. He sent forward a detachment of two companies, under Captain Grone, with two field-pieces, toward Cedar Creek and Grand Falls, on the Neosho, to occupy a road in this supposed route of the Confederates, and to gain information, while he pushed on with the remainder of his command to Neosho, receiving greetings of welcome from the inhabitants on the way, who had been pillaged by the insurgents. He had already summoned Colonel Salomon, with his Missouri battalion, to join him at Neosho, and with this addition to his force, he went forward to meet his foe, leaving a single rifle company, under Captain Conrad, to p
Newton County (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
nd Arkansas. See page 543, volume I. Colonel Sigel arrived at Springfield on the 23d of June, where he was informed that the Confederates, under Governor Jackson, were making their way from the Osage River in a southwesterly direction. He pushed on to Sarcoxie, a post-village in Jackson County, where he arrived toward the evening of the 28th, and learned that General Price, with about nine hundred troops, was encamped at Pool's Prairie, a few miles north of Neosho, the capital of Newton County, and that other State troops, under Jackson and Rains, were making their way in the same direction. It. was important to prevent their junction. Sigel resolved to march first on Price, and capture or disperse his force, and then, turning northward, attack the other troops, and so open a communication with General Lyon, who, he had been informed (but incorrectly), had been fighting with the Confederates on the banks of the Little Osage. Sigel's march from Sarcoxie had just commenced,
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