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White Head (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
. Putnam, W. J. Hoskiss; Huzzar, Fred. Crocker; Hunchback, E. R. Calhoun; Hetzel, H. K. Davenport; J. Nv. Seymour, F. S. Welles; Louisiana, Hooker; Lockwood, S. L. Graves; Lancer, B. Morley; Morse, Peter Hayes; Philadelphia, Silas Reynolds; pioneer, C. S. Baker; picket, T. P. Ives; rocket, James Lake; Ranger, J. B. Childs; Stars and Stripes, Reed Werden; Southfield, Behm; Shawsheen, T. S. Wood-ward; shrapnel, Ed. Staples; Underwriter, Jeffers; Valley City, J. C. Chaplin; Vidette,---------; White-head, French; young Rover, I. B. Studley. every thing necessary for the peculiar service assigned to the expedition was furnished and arranged. The fleet guns were equipped with ship and field carriages, that they might be used on land or water; and the cannon were mostly of the newest construction. A well-organized signal corps accompanied the expedition, and there were two extensive pontoon trains. Fully equipped in every way, the expedition, whose destination had been kept a profound secr
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
eet consisted of thirty-one gun-boats, with an aggregate armament of ninety-four guns. These were the Brickner, commanded by J. C. Giddings; Ceres, S. A. McDermaid; Chasseur, John West; corn. Barney, R. D. Renshaw; corn. Perry, C. H. Flusser; Delaware, S. P. Quackenbush; granite, E. Boomer; granite, W. B. Avery; Gen. Putnam, W. J. Hoskiss; Huzzar, Fred. Crocker; Hunchback, E. R. Calhoun; Hetzel, H. K. Davenport; J. Nv. Seymour, F. S. Welles; Louisiana, Hooker; Lockwood, S. L. Graves; Lancer, followed Feb. 9, 1862. by Captain Rowan. It had gone up Albemarle Sound thirty or forty miles, and into the Pasquotank River, toward Elizabeth City, not far southeast of the great Dismal Swamp. Rowan's fleet consisted of fourteen vessels, the Delaware being his flag-ship. On the morning of the 10th it was in the River near Elizabeth City, and confronting seven steamers and a schooner armed with two 32-pounders, and a four-gun battery on the shore, and one heavy gun in the town in front. The
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ng tranquil after the excitement caused by the Trent affair, when its attention was keenly fixed on another expedition to the coast of North Carolina, already alluded to. The land and naval armaments of which it was composed were assembled in Hampton Roads early in January, 1862, ready for departure, after a preparation of only two months. Over a hundred steam and sailing vessels, consisting of gun-boats, transports, and tugs, and about sixteen thousand troops, mostly recruited in New England, e mostly of the newest construction. A well-organized signal corps accompanied the expedition, and there were two extensive pontoon trains. Fully equipped in every way, the expedition, whose destination had been kept a profound secret, left Hampton Roads on Sunday, the 11th of January, 1862. and went to sea. when it was known that the expedition had actually gone out upon th<*> Atlantic at that inclement season, there was great anxiety in the public Stephen C. Rowan. mind. The storm o
Liverpool (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 7
for the two nations, it was, pregnant with promises of disaster to the conspirators and their cause. It was so unexpected and discouraging to them and their sympathizers in America and great Britain, who hoped for and confidently expected A. War between the two Governments that would redound to the benefit of the insurgents, that they could not conceal their chagrin and disappointment. They had tried to fan the flame of discord between the Cabinets of Washington and London. In England, Liverpool was the focus of efforts in aid of the rebellion. There the friends of the conspirators held a meeting, Nov. 28, 1861. the meeting was called by the following placard, posted all over the town: Outrage on the British flag — the Southern Commissioners forcibly removed from a British mail steamer. A public meeting will be held in the cotton Salesroom at three o'clock. which was presided over by James Spence, who, for a time, was the fiscal agent of the Confederates and a bitter enemy
Pasquotank (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
owerful to allow much complaint from the outraged people. in his Report to General Huger, Wise said Roanoke Island was the key to all the defenses of Norfolk. It unlocked two sounds — Albemarle and Currituck; eight rivers — the North, West, Pasquotank, Perquimmons, little, Chowan, Roanoke. And Alligator; four canals — the Albemarle and Chesapeake, Dismal Swamp, North-West, and Suffolk; two railways — the Petersburg and Norfolk, and seaboard and Roanoke. At the same time it guarded four-fif was changed to Fort Foster; Fort Huger to Fort Reno and Fort Blanchard to Fort Parke. the Confederate flotilla was immediately followed Feb. 9, 1862. by Captain Rowan. It had gone up Albemarle Sound thirty or forty miles, and into the Pasquotank River, toward Elizabeth City, not far southeast of the great Dismal Swamp. Rowan's fleet consisted of fourteen vessels, the Delaware being his flag-ship. On the morning of the 10th it was in the River near Elizabeth City, and confronting seven
Chesapeake Bay (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
rituck; eight rivers — the North, West, Pasquotank, Perquimmons, little, Chowan, Roanoke. And Alligator; four canals — the Albemarle and Chesapeake, Dismal Swamp, North-West, and Suffolk; two railways — the Petersburg and Norfolk, and seaboard and Roanoke. At the same time it guarded four-fifths of the supplies for Norfolk. Its fall, Wise said, gave lodgment to the Nationals in a safe harbor from storms, and a command of the seaboard from Oregon Inlet to Cape Henry, at the entrance of Chesapeake Bay. it should have been defended, he said, at the expense of Twenty thousand men, and many millions of dollars. the conquest was complete, and Burnside, taking up his quarters at a house near Fort Bartow, prepared at once for other aggressive movements on Burnside's Headquarters. the coast. In his report, he generously said, I owe every thing to Generals Foster, Reno, and Parke, and sadly gave the names of Colonel Charles S. Russell and Lieutenant-Colonel Vigeur de Monteuil the en<
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
e gigantic resources of a quarter of the globe. A little later, Earl Russell, the Minister for Foreign Affairs, in an afterdinner speech at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, declared that the struggle in America was on the one side for empire, and on the other for power, and not for the great principles of human liberty, and for the life of the Republic, for which the Government was really contending. A little later still, the Earl of Shrewsbury, speaking with hope for his class, at the old city of Worcester, said that he saw in America the trial of Democracy, and its failure. He believed the dissolution of the Union to be inevitable, and that men there before him would live to see an aristocracy established in America. In the same hour, Sir John Pakington, formerly a cabinet minister, and then a member of Parliament, told the same hearers, that, from President Lincoln, downward, there was not a man in America who would venture to tell them that he really thought it possible that by the forc
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): chapter 7
. That achievement was left for Captain Charles Wilkes, of the navy, to perform, an officer of worldwide fame, as the commander of the American Exploring Expedition to the South Seas, a quarter of a century before. At that time he was on his way home from the coast of Africa, in command of the National steam sloop-of-war San Jacinto, mounting thirteen guns. He put into the port of St. Thomas, and there hearing of the movements of the pirate ship Sumter, he departed on, a cruise in the Gulf of Mexico and among the West India Islands in search of it. At Havana he was informed of the presence and intentions of the Confederate Ambassadors, and after satisfying himself that the law of nations, and especially the settled British interpretation of the law concerning neutrals and belligerents, would justify his interception of the Trent, and the seizure on board of it of the two Ambassadors, he went out Nov. 2. in the track of that vessel in the Bahama Channel, two hundred and forty miles
Chimborazo (Nicaragua) (search for this): chapter 7
lieve this — that the greatest of all crimes which any people in the history of the world has ever been connected with — the keeping in slavery four millions of human beings — is, in the providence of a Power very much higher than that of the Prime Minister of England, or of the President of the United States, marching on, as I believe, to its entire abolition. and there were leading men, who, in the qualities of head and heart, towered above the common level of all society in England as Chimborazo rises above the common height of the Andes, who comprehended the character of our Government, the causes of the rebellion, and the war it was making upon the rights of man; and with a true catholic and Christian spirit they rebuked the selfishness of the ruling class. Among these, John Bright, the Quaker, and eminent British statesman, stood most conspicuous. In the midst of the tumultuous surges of popular excitement that rocked the British islands in December and January, his voice, in<
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ey were original conspirators. The former was a native of Virginia, and the latter of New York, but long a resident of Louisiana. The former was accredited to the Court of St. James, and the latter to the Court of St. Cloud. Both had been prominewin for them the good offices of confiding English statesmen. Slidell (whose wife was an accomplished French Creole of Louisiana) was well versed in the French language and habits; and for adroit trickery and reckless disregard of truth, honor, or W. J. Hoskiss; Huzzar, Fred. Crocker; Hunchback, E. R. Calhoun; Hetzel, H. K. Davenport; J. Nv. Seymour, F. S. Welles; Louisiana, Hooker; Lockwood, S. L. Graves; Lancer, B. Morley; Morse, Peter Hayes; Philadelphia, Silas Reynolds; pioneer, C. S. Banced his gun-boats in three columns, the first being led by the Stars and Stripes, Lieutenant Werden; the second by the Louisiana, Commander Alexander Murray; and the third by the Hetzel, Lieutenant H. R. Davenport. Goldsborough made the South-fiel
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