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Boston Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
sengers, was permitted to proceed on its voyage, after a detention of only little more than two hours. The captives were conveyed first to New York and then to Boston Harbor, where they were furnished Fort Warren. with quarters in Fort Warren, Fort Warren is on George's Island, and commands the main entrance to Boston Harbor. Boston Harbor. It is a strong work of masonry, with five fronts, the southern, eastern, and northern ones being seen in the little sketch. Around the main work is a ditch 30 feet in width. The entire circuit of the fort is 8,136 feet. Against the south front is an outwork of much strength, which is seen in the sketch. then used as a prison for involved in the act. Public honors were tendered to Commander Wilkes, The crew of the San Jacinto presented to Lieutenant Fairfax, on board that vessel, in Boston Harbor, a beautiful silver goblet, with national, naval, and military devices on it, and the inscription,--Presented to Lieutenant Fairfax, by the crew of the San Jac
Denmark (Denmark) (search for this): chapter 7
ot only prohibited from carrying naval stores, but were seized, and their cargoes used for the benefit of the English war-marine. From that time until the present, Great Britain has steadily adhered to The rule of 1756, excepting in a few instances, when it suited her interests to make a temporary change in her policy. So injuriously did this Rule, practically enforced, operate upon the commerce of the world for England's benefit, that in 1780 the northern powers of Europe-Russia, Sweden, Denmark, and Holland-formed a treaty of alliance, called the Armed neutrality, to resist the pretensions and evil practices of Great Britain. The doctrine of the league was that of Frederick, but much enlarged. Armaments were prepared to sustain the doctrine, but Great Britain's naval strength was too great, and the effort failed. In 1798, when Great Britain was at war with France, The rule of 1756 was again put into active operation. By an order in Council, it was directed that all vessels l
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
sand troops, mostly recruited in New England, composed the expedition. General Ambrose Everett Burnside, an Indianian by birth, a West Point graduate, 1847. and a resident of Rhode Island when Louis M. Goldsborough. the war broke out, was appointed the commander-in-chief and the naval operations were intrusted to flag-officer Louis M. Goldsborough, then the commander of the North Atlantic naval squadron. the military force which, like Butler's, see page 106. had been gathered at Annapolis, was composed of fifteen regiments and a battalion of infantry, a battery of artillery, and a large number of gunners for the armed vessels, who were able, to render service on land if required. The whole force was divided into three brigades, commanded respectively by Generals John G. Foster, of Fort Sumter fame, Jesse L. Reno, and John G. Parke. the first brigade (Foster's) was composed of the Twenty-third, Twenty-Fourth, Twenty-Fifth, and Twenty-seventh Massachusetts regiments, and
Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
52. departure of Mason and Slidell for Europe as Embassadors of the Confederate States, 153. their cordial reception at Havana they embark for England in the steamer Trent, and are captured by Captain Wilkes, 154. Mason and Slidell in Fort Warrenkade-runners and Confederate pirate-ships always found a welcome and shelter during the war, and thence went to Cuba. At Havana, the Ambassadors were greeted with the most friendly expressions and acts, by the British Consul and other sympathizers, e pirate ship Sumter, he departed on, a cruise in the Gulf of Mexico and among the West India Islands in search of it. At Havana he was informed of the presence and intentions of the Confederate Ambassadors, and after satisfying himself that the law two Ambassadors, he went out Nov. 2. in the track of that vessel in the Bahama Channel, two hundred and forty miles from Havana, and awaited its appearance. He was gratified with that apparition toward noon on the 8th of November, when off Paredon
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Ord. General J. E. B. Stuart, His troops consisted of the Eleventh Virginia, Colonel Garland; Sixth South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Seagrist; Tenth Alabama, Colonel Harvey; First Kentucky, Colonel T. H. Taylor; the Sumter Flying Artillery, four pieces, Captain Cutts; and detachments from two North Carolina cavalry regiments, 1,000 in number, under Major Gordon. Stuart was also on a foraging expedition, and had about 200 wagons with him. who came up the road from the direction of Centreville. A severe fight ensued. The Confederates were greatly outnumbered, and were soon so beaten that they fled in haste, carrying in their wagons little else than their wounded men. The brunt of the battle had fallen on the Sixth and Ninth Pennsylvania, the Rifles, and Easton's Battery. The National loss consisted of seven killed and sixty wounded; and their gain was a victory, and sixteen wagon-loads of excellent hay, and twenty-two of corn. Stuart reported his loss at forty-three killed
Georges Island (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
e was sent, and Mason and Slidell, compelled to yield to circumstances, went. quietly on board the San Jacinto with their secretaries. The Trent, with the families of Slidell and Eustis on board, and its large number of passengers, was permitted to proceed on its voyage, after a detention of only little more than two hours. The captives were conveyed first to New York and then to Boston Harbor, where they were furnished Fort Warren. with quarters in Fort Warren, Fort Warren is on George's Island, and commands the main entrance to Boston Harbor. It is a strong work of masonry, with five fronts, the southern, eastern, and northern ones being seen in the little sketch. Around the main work is a ditch 30 feet in width. The entire circuit of the fort is 8,136 feet. Against the south front is an outwork of much strength, which is seen in the sketch. then used as a prison for political offenders, under the charge of Captain Dimick, the defender of Fortress Monroe against the Virgin
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
held in the cotton Salesroom at three o'clock. which was presided over by James Spence, who, for a time, was the fiscal agent of the Confederates and a bitter enemy of the Republic. On that occasion the act of Wilkes was denounced as a gross violation of the honor of the British flag, for which, according to a resolution offered by Spence, the most ample reparation should be demanded. In concert with these expressions, a sympathizing friend in the American Congress (C. L. Vallandigham, of Ohio) offered a resolution Dec. 16. in the House of Representatives, in which the President was enjoined to maintain the position of approval and adoption by the Government (already assumed by the House) of the act of Captain Wilkes, in spite of any menace or demand of the British Government, and declaring that this House pledges its full support in upholding now the honor and vindicating the courage of the Government and people of the United States against a Foreign power. we have heard the fir
Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ntry. They finally went to sea on the 12th of October, 1861. in the small steamship Theodore, which left Charleston harbor at a little past midnight, while rain was falling copiously, and in the darkness escaped the notice of the blockading fleet. Mason was accompanied by his secretary (Mr. McFarland), and Slidell by his wife and four children, and his secretary (Mr. Eustis) and his wife, who was a daughter of Corcoran, the eminent banker of Washington City. The Theodore touched first at Nassau, New Providence, a British port, where blockade-runners and Confederate pirate-ships always found a welcome and shelter during the war, and thence went to Cuba. At Havana, the Ambassadors were greeted with the most friendly expressions and acts, by the British Consul and other sympathizers, and there they took passage for St. Thomas, Nov. 7, 1861. in the British mail-steamer Trent, Captain Moir, intending to leave for England in the next regular packet from that island to Southampton. C
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
blow that should make them more circumspect, and stop their incursions. He had observed that on such occasions they generally left a strong reserve at Drainsville, and he determined to attempt their capture when an opportunity should offer. Later in December the opportunity occurred, and he ordered Brigadier-General E. O. C. Ord to attempt the achievement; and at the same time to gather forage from the farms of the secessionists. Ord, with his brigade, His brigade was composed of Pennsylvania regiments, and consisted of the Ninth, Colonel Jackson; Tenth, Colonel McCalmont; Twelfth, Colonel Taggart; Bucktail Rifles, Lieutenant-Colonel T. L. Kane; a battalion of the Sixth; two squadrons of cavalry, and Easton's Battery — in all about 4,000 men. undertook the enterprise on the 20th. Dec., 1861. McCall ordered Brigadier-General Reynolds to move forward with his brigade toward Leesburg, as far as Difficult Creek, to support Ord, if required. When the force of the latter was withi
Saint Thomas (search for this): chapter 7
hips always found a welcome and shelter during the war, and thence went to Cuba. At Havana, the Ambassadors were greeted with the most friendly expressions and acts, by the British Consul and other sympathizers, and there they took passage for St. Thomas, Nov. 7, 1861. in the British mail-steamer Trent, Captain Moir, intending to leave for England in the next regular packet from that island to Southampton. Charles Wilkes. The National Government heard of the departure of Mason and Slidean Exploring Expedition to the South Seas, a quarter of a century before. At that time he was on his way home from the coast of Africa, in command of the National steam sloop-of-war San Jacinto, mounting thirteen guns. He put into the port of St. Thomas, and there hearing of the movements of the pirate ship Sumter, he departed on, a cruise in the Gulf of Mexico and among the West India Islands in search of it. At Havana he was informed of the presence and intentions of the Confederate Ambassad
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