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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
saying the necessities of the Army of the Potomac have bottled me up at Bermuda Hundred. See Report of Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant, of the Armies of the United States--1864-65, July 22, 1865. While Butler's main army was making movements toward Richmond, Kautz was out upon another raid on the railways leading to that cit of the Army of the Potomac was virtually closed, and, in view of the gloomy aspect of affairs, it recommended the setting apart of an early day throughout the United States as one for fasting, humiliation, and prayer. It also called for 400,000 more troops, and threatened an immediate and peremptory draft for that number if they an I was willing to make, all could not be accomplished that I had designed north of Richmond. --Report of Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant, of the Armies of the United States--1864-65, July 22, 1865. He had seriously crippled his adversary, who lacked means for recuperation, and he now determined to starve him into submission. Havi
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
as unknown by the Nationals, and a wise caution, rightfully exercised, caused a delay fatal to the speedy achievement of such victories, for strength was quickly imparted to both posts. When the movement of Butler and the arrival of Gillmore with troops from Charleston harbor was first known to the Confederates at Richmond, Beauregard was ordered to hasten from Charleston to the latter place, with all possible dispatch, with the troops under his command there, others drawn from Georgia and Florida, and such as he might gather in his passage through North Carolina. He instantly obeyed, and when General Kautz struck the Weldon road, as we have seen, he found these re-enforcements for Lee passing over it. A large portion of them were left south of that cutting, D. H. Hill, with 8,000 troops, had passed northward, and Beauregard, with 5,000, was south of Stony Creek Station. Besides the bridge and track, a large quantity of provisions and forage was destroyed at that place. but as K
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 12: operations against Richmond. Movements of the Army of the James, 317. seizure of City Point and its vicinity, 318. operations in Southeastern Virginia, 319. Confederate troops called from Charleston to the defense of Petersburg and Richmond, 320. events between Petersburg and Richmond, 321, 322. Union cn the opposite page, omitted by accident when that record was printed, will not only give the reader an idea of the entire region of stirring operations in Southeastern Virginia at that time, but may be usefully consulted when studying the great and decisive campaign we are now considering. and they made preparations accordingly. Butler's Address to the Soldiers qf the Army of the James, October 11, 1864. The movement was a complete surprise to the Confederates, Operations in South eastern Virginia. and produced great consternation at Richmond. In the mean time the armed vessels had been busy in keeping the river open, and they now engaged in the peri
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
est Point, at the head of York River, to begin the construction of wharves, Confederate defenses between Hampton and Williamsburg. while cavalry made a demonstration in the direction of Richmond. He also sent the bulk of his army in that direction as far as the old lines of McClellan For an account of the operations of McClellan between Fortress Monroe and Williamsburg, see Chapters. XIV. and XV., volume II. The route from Hampton; the fortifications at Big Bethel, and in the vicinity of Yorktown and Williamsburg, are indicated in the little map on this page. at Yorktown and Gloucester Point; and so successful was the stratagem, that the Confederates were satisfied that Butler was about to move on Richmond in the pathway trodden byhe bridge there; while Colonel Robert M. West, with about eighteen hundred cavalry (mostly colored men), advanced from Williamsburg up the north bank of the James River, keeping parallel with the great flotilla of war vessels and transports on its bo
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
force was about forty thousand men, and was composed chiefly of the Eighteenth Army Corps, commanded by General W. F. Smith, and the Tenth Army Corps, which had lately been ordered from South Carolina, led by General Gillmore, who arrived at Fortress Monroe on the 3d of May. Butler's first care was to mislead the Confederates concerning his intentions. For that purpose he first sent May 1. Henry's brigade of New York troops to West Point, at the head of York River, to begin the constructioeen Hampton and Williamsburg. while cavalry made a demonstration in the direction of Richmond. He also sent the bulk of his army in that direction as far as the old lines of McClellan For an account of the operations of McClellan between Fortress Monroe and Williamsburg, see Chapters. XIV. and XV., volume II. The route from Hampton; the fortifications at Big Bethel, and in the vicinity of Yorktown and Williamsburg, are indicated in the little map on this page. at Yorktown and Gloucester
Westover (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
mbarked at the head of the York, and sent back by water to Bermuda Hundred. Then the Army of the Potomac moved. Warren's corps, preceded by Wilson's cavalry,. forced the passage of the Chickahominy at Long Bridge with very little trouble, and made demonstrations in the direction of Richmond, to mask the real movements of the army. Hancock followed Warren across the stream, and marched directly to Wilcox's Wharf, on the James, below Harrison's Landing, between Charles City Court-House and Westover, See page 455, volume II. where he was ferried across. Wright and Burnside crossed the Chickahominy at Jones's. bridge, lower down; while the trains, for greater safety, took a route still further east, and crossed at Coles's Ferry. Lee discovered the withdrawal of his antagonist from his front on the morning of the 13th; but finding Warren across the Chickahominy, and on the road leading through White Oak Swamp to Richmond, he concluded that Grant was about to march by that route up
Trevilian (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ral railway at Trevilian's Station, where he expected the co-operation of General Hunter. That leader, as we have seen, See page 815. was at Staunton, and Sheridan was left to deal, alone, with the gathering Confederates on the railway. At Trevilian's he encountered and routed some horsemen under Hampton, and then destroyed the road almost to Louisa Court-House, where he was attacked by a much larger force. After a contest, he was compelled to retrace his steps to Trevilian's, where he foTrevilian's, where he fought a sanguinary battle, and then withdrew. He swept around, by Spottsylvania Court-House and Guiney's Station, to White House, and rejoined Grant's army, having lost during his raid over seven hundred men, and captured nearly four hundred. He inflicted a loss of men upon the Confederates quite equal to his own. Among their killed was the active General Rosser. Grant continued moving slowly to the left, and keeping up the appearance of an intention to cross the Chickahominy and march on R
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
urther attempts to take the Confederate lines by storm were abandoned for awhile. It was evident to the Lieutenant-General that the bulk of Lee's Army was behind them, and he prepared for a regular siege of them. He at once began intrenching, and to extend his left in the direction of the Petersburg and Weldon railway, which he desired to seize, and thus envelop Petersburg with his Army. The Corps of Hancock Hancock was now disabled by the breaking out afresh of his wound received at Gettysburg, and General Birney was in temporary command of the Second Corps. and Wright were moved June 21, 1864. stealthily to the left, for the purpose of turning the Confederate right; but when the former, moving in the advance, reached the Jerusalem plank road, between the Norfolk and Weldon railways, it was met by a Confederate force, and pushed back to a position where it connected with the Fifth Corps. On the following morning June 22. both Corps (Second and Sixth) advanced together, and we
Long Bridge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ne, 1864. when every thing was in readiness for the army to move to the James. White House was abandoned as a base of supplies; the rails and ties of the York River railway leading from it to Richmond were taken up and sent in barges to City Point, and the command of General Smith was re-embarked at the head of the York, and sent back by water to Bermuda Hundred. Then the Army of the Potomac moved. Warren's corps, preceded by Wilson's cavalry,. forced the passage of the Chickahominy at Long Bridge with very little trouble, and made demonstrations in the direction of Richmond, to mask the real movements of the army. Hancock followed Warren across the stream, and marched directly to Wilcox's Wharf, on the James, below Harrison's Landing, between Charles City Court-House and Westover, See page 455, volume II. where he was ferried across. Wright and Burnside crossed the Chickahominy at Jones's. bridge, lower down; while the trains, for greater safety, took a route still further ea
Chickahominy (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
lla of war vessels and transports on its bosom. This expedition, and the advance of the Army of the Potomac from the north, were grand movements preliminary to another dreadful struggle for the possession of Richmond in the vicinity of the Chickahominy River — a region made forever memorable by the seven days battles there, in the summer of 1862. The expedition moved so unexpectedly and rapidly up the river, that the Confederates could make no effective dispositions for opposing it. Portionstheir rifle-pits. Meanwhile, Wright had formed on the left of Hancock and Burnside on his right; while Lee strengthened his own right, now menaced by Warren. Grant was now satisfied that he would be compelled to force the passage of the Chickahominy River, and he was equally satisfied that it would be folly to make a direct attack upon Lee's front. So he planned a flank movement, and prepared to cross the Chickahominy on Lee's right, not far from Cool Arbor, See note 2, page 886, volume
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