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Thibodeaux (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
to defend it. Banks's outposts were drawn into Brashear City, where there seems to have been very little preparation made for a defense of that important interior post, and the vast amount of National property collected there. Even its only railway communication with New Orleans appears to have been strangely undefended, and it was not until word suddenly reached Lieutenant-Colonel Stickney, in command at Brashear, that the Confederates had struck the road at La Fourche Crossing, near Thibodeaux, that a suspicion of danger in that quarter was entertained. Stickney at once hastened with the greater portion of his command to oppose that dangerous movement, and, in so doing he left Brashear exposed. Taylor's troops found little difficulty in raiding all over the country between Brashear and the Mississippi at New Orleans. They captured little posts here and there; and some Texans, dashing into Plaquemine, June 18. on the Mississippi, captured some convalescent prisoners, and burn
Clarksville, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
rters were at Lebanon, was in St. Louis, when he heard of Shelby's raid. He hastened back to camp, gathered what men he could, and hurried in a direction to intercept the fugitives. He reached Humansville, in Polk County, just as they had passed through it, closely pursued by others. There the guerrillas lost their remaining gun. McNeil joined in the chase, which led into Arkansas, the Confederates flying through Huntsville, in Madison County, and over the Buffalo mountains to Clarksville, in Johnson County. There McNeil halted, for the more nimble-footed guerrillas had crossed the Arkansas River, and disappeared. McNeil then marched leisurely up the river to Fort Smith, and, in obedience to authority, assumed the command of the Army of the Frontier, in place of General Blunt, who had been relieved. There was now general quiet throughout Missouri and Arkansas. One or two guerrilla bands showed some vitality, and late in October Marmaduke made an effort to capture Pine Bluff, th
Cowleech Fork Sabine River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ercise of his discretionary powers, he fitted out an expedition to make a lodgment on Texas soil at Sabine City, at the Sabine Pass. This is the name of the outlet from Sabine Lake into the Gulf of Mexico. Sabine Lake is an expansion of the Sabine River, about five miles from its entrance into the Gulf of Mexico at the southwest extremity of Louisiana, between which State and that of Texas the Sabine River, for a long distance, forms the boundary line. There was the terminus of a railway leadSabine River, for a long distance, forms the boundary line. There was the terminus of a railway leading into the heart of Eastern Texas, and which was crossed by another leading to Houston, the capital of that State. Banks felt certain that by a successful movement at this point he might speedily concentrate full 15,000 men at Houston, which would place in his hands the control of all the railway communications of Texas, and the most populous part of the State, and enable him to move into the interior in any direction, or fall back upon Galveston, thus leaving the army free to move upon Mob
Plaquemine (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
shear, that the Confederates had struck the road at La Fourche Crossing, near Thibodeaux, that a suspicion of danger in that quarter was entertained. Stickney at once hastened with the greater portion of his command to oppose that dangerous movement, and, in so doing he left Brashear exposed. Taylor's troops found little difficulty in raiding all over the country between Brashear and the Mississippi at New Orleans. They captured little posts here and there; and some Texans, dashing into Plaquemine, June 18. on the Mississippi, captured some convalescent prisoners, and burnt four steamers, seventy-five bales of cotton, and a barge. At the same time a co-operating force, under the Confederate Generals Green and Mouton, appeared on the site of Berwick, a small village opposite Brashear, which Lieutenant Ryder, in command of a gun-boat, had bombarded and burnt a little while before. The weak garrison in Fort Buchanan, at Brashear, was then in command of a sick colonel, and illy prepa
Savannah River (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
, and also of Folly Island, eastward of Stono inlet, where their pickets confronted those of the Confederates on Morris Island, at Light-House inlet. At about the time of Gillmore's arrival, rumors reached Dupont that his blockading vessels were in danger from a very powerful iron-clad ram, which for fourteen months had been in preparation at Savannah, and was then completed. The rumor was true. A swift British blockade-runner, named Fingal, built in the Clyde, which had gone up the Savannah River full eighteen months before with a valuable cargo, and had not been able to get out to sea again, had been converted into a warrior which the Confederates believed would be a match for any two monitors then afloat. She was thoroughly armed with a coat of thick oak and pine, covered with heavy bars of iron. She bore four great guns, and was provided with a powerful beak. She was named Atlanta, and her commander was Lieutenant W. A. Webb, formerly of the National Navy, who had a crew of
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
arleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. Preparations furi and Arkansas, 212. Marmaduke's raid into Missouri, 213. battle at Honey Springs, 214. massacr the Indian country, 217. Shelby's raid into Missouri, 218. advance of Taylor in Louisiana, 219. forces in arms. One of the worst enemies of Missouri (the rebel Governor Jackson See page 201, y leaders in Arkansas, he planned a raid into Missouri, having for its chief objective the capture oississippi Department, he pushed rapidly into Missouri, and following the general line of the St. Fr, Colonel Catherwood, at Pineville, in Southwestern Missouri; but he was beaten, and driven away wi a most savage raid was made into Kansas from Missouri, by a band of desperadoes collected in the weuietly in his office, tracing a map of Southeastern Missouri, in perfect security as he supposed, fmith, and swept rapidly northward into Southwestern Missouri, where, at a place called Crooked Prai[6 more...]
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
the Confederates, especially those on Morris Island. He had been instructed not to allow them to erect any more fortifications on that strip of land, for it had been determined to seize it, and begin a regular and systematic siege of Charleston by troops and ships. General Hunter was relieved of the command of the Department of the South, and General Q. A. Gillmore, who captured Fort Pulaski the year before, See page 819, volume II. was assigned to it. June 2, 1863. He arrived at Hilton Head on the 12th of June, and immediately assumed command. He found there not quite eighteen thousand land troops, mostly veterans. A greater portion of them were the men left there by General Foster. The lines of his Department did not extend far into the interior, but were of great length, parallel with the coast. He had to picket a line about two hundred and fifty miles in length, besides establishing posts at different points. This service left him not more than eleven thousand men th
Fayetteville, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Landing by a gang of guerrillas, led by George Todd, who committed great atrocities. They robbed the boat and all persons on board, and then murdered several of the white passengers, and about twenty negroes, who, with sixty others (who escaped), were flying from bondage. An attempt to gain freedom was a heinous crime in the eyes of the ruffians, and the poor fugitives were placed in a row alongside of the boat, and one after another was shot through the head. In the spring of 1863, Fayetteville was occupied by some Union cavalry and infantry, under Colonel M. L. Harrison, and, on the 18th of April, they were attacked by nearly two thousand mounted Confederates and two guns, led by General W. L. Cabell. He had marched rapidly over the Boston mountains from Ozark, with the intention of surprising Harrison at dawn, but he did not arrive until after sunrise. About five hundred of the Unionists kept up a spirited fight with the assailants until about noon, when the latter were repu
Wilmington River (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
inted, and at her bow was an iron beak six feet in length, to which was suspended a submarine torpedo, charged with 50 pounds of gunpowder, for blowing up any vessel she might attack. Deserters from the Atlanta reported her ready for work, and Admiral Dupont sent the Weehawken, Captain Rodgers, and Nahant, Commander Downes, to Wassaw Sound, to watch her. She was considered by her commander a match for both, and on the morning of the 17th of June, she was seen moving rapidly down the Wilmington River to attack them, accompanied by two wooden gun-boats of Tattnall's Mosquito Fleet, which were intended to tow up to Savannah the captured monitors. After the battle, the Atlanta was to proceed to sea, and destroy or disperse the blockading squadrons off Charleston and Wilmington. She was provided with instruments, and with stores of every kind for a long cruise, especially of choice liquors. No one among the Confederates doubted her invincibility. The gun-boats that accompanied her w
Algiers (Algeria) (search for this): chapter 7
d, with a loss, in both actions, of nearly three hundred men, killed, wounded, and made prisoners. Finding the Confederates in heavy force in his rear, Stickney evacuated the post and withdrew to New Orleans, leaving the way open for the foe to Algiers, opposite that city. Four days after the capture of Brashear City, General Green attempted to seize Fort Butler, at Donaldsonville, See page 528, volume II. by a midnight assault. The fort was garrisoned by two hundred and twenty-five mene, for Banks's forces, released by the fall of Port Hudson, quickly expelled the Confederates from the region eastward of the Atchafalaya. Although New Orleans was garrisoned by only about seven hundred men when the way was opened for Taylor to Algiers, he dared not attempt the capture of that city, because of the war vessels of Farragut that were watching the broad bosom of the stream over which he would be compelled to pass, and the facility with which troops might be brought down from Port
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