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Brazos River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ng fort, called Esperanza, garrisoned by two thousand men of all arms. It was invested, and, after a sharp action, the Confederates blew up their magazine and fled, Nov. 30. most of the garrison escaping. These important conquests, achieved in the space of a month, promised a speedy closing of the coast of Texas to blockade-runners, and great advantage to the Union cause in that region. No place of importance on that coast was now left to the Confederates, excepting at the mouth of the Brazos and on Galveston Island, at each of which they had formidable works; and a greater portion of their troops in Texas, commanded by General Magruder, were concentrated on the coast, between Houston, Galveston, and Indianola. Banks was anxious to follow up his successes by moving on Indianola, on the west side of Matagorda Bay, or upon Matagorda, at the mouth of the Colorado. This would have brought him into collision with a greater portion of Magruder's troops. He did not feel strong enough
Opelousas (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
reappeared with about four thousand followers, including a large number of Texas cavalry. He reoccupied Alexandria and Opelousas, and garrisoned Fort de Russy, early in June. He then swept rapidly through Fort De Russy. the State, over the rout July 22. (but not until he had secured every thing valuable, and burned every thing else combustible), and retired to Opelousas and Alexandria. General Banks now turned his thoughts to aggressive movements. He was visited early in September by order to mask his expedition against Texas by sea, Banks ordered General C. C. Washburne to advance from Brashear upon Opelousas, to give the impression that a march upon Alexandria or Shreveport was begun. Washburne reached Opelousas without resiOpelousas without resistance, but when, in obedience to orders, he commenced falling back, Taylor and Green pursued him closely. Finally, they swept Nov. 3. stealthily, swiftly, and unexpectedly, out of a thick wood, and fell upon Washburne's right, held by General Bur
Matagorda, Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
reat advantage to the Union cause in that region. No place of importance on that coast was now left to the Confederates, excepting at the mouth of the Brazos and on Galveston Island, at each of which they had formidable works; and a greater portion of their troops in Texas, commanded by General Magruder, were concentrated on the coast, between Houston, Galveston, and Indianola. Banks was anxious to follow up his successes by moving on Indianola, on the west side of Matagorda Bay, or upon Matagorda, at the mouth of the Colorado. This would have brought him into collision with a greater portion of Magruder's troops. He did not feel strong enough to undertake a task so perilous. He asked for re-enforcements, but they could not be furnished, and at about the close of the year he returned to New Orleans, leaving General Dana on the Rio Grande. That officer sent a force more than a hundred miles up that river, and another toward Corpus Christi, but they found no armed Confederates; an
Sabine Pass (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Louisiana, 219. events near Donaldsonville, 220. expedition to Sabine Pass, 221. Nationals repulsed at Sabine Pass expedition to the Rio Sabine Pass expedition to the Rio Grande, 223. possession of the Texan harbors, 224. War with the Sioux Indians, 225. There was comparative quiet along the coasts of Sout he fitted out an expedition to make a lodgment on Texas soil at Sabine City, at the Sabine Pass. This is the name of the outlet from SabiSabine Pass. This is the name of the outlet from Sabine Lake into the Gulf of Mexico. Sabine Lake is an expansion of the Sabine River, about five miles from its entrance into the Gulf of Mexico alin as leader, who was instructed to land them a few miles below Sabine Pass, and then move directly upon Confederate works, if any were foun Instead of following his instructions, to land lis troops below Sabine Pass, Franklin arranged with Crocker to have the gun-boats make a dirof September, the gun-boats and trans. ports crossed the bar at Sabine Pass, and in the afternoon the Clifton, Sachem, and Arizona, went up
Arizona (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
he Clifton his flag-ship. The flotilla consisted of the Clifton, Lieutenant Crocker; Sachem, Lieutenant Amos Johnson; Arizona, Acting-Master H. Tibbetts; and Granite City, Acting-Master C. W. Samson-all light-draft vessels. The expedition sailed September, the gun-boats and trans. ports crossed the bar at Sabine Pass, and in the afternoon the Clifton, Sachem, and Arizona, went up two separate channels to attack the fort (which mounted eight heavy guns, three of them rifled), leaving the Gr gunboats were abreast the fort they received a fire from the whole eight guns on shore. The boilers of the Clifton and Arizona were penetrated by shells, and the vessels, instantly enveloped in scalding steam, displayed white flags and surrendered the attack, the two vessels were in tow of Confederate steamers-small bay craft that had been converted into rams. The Arizona ran aground, and Franklin, seeing the naval force suddenly disabled, made no serious attempt to land, but, with the tran
Granite City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
f the expedition. These were commanded by Lieutenant Frederick Crocker, who made the Clifton his flag-ship. The flotilla consisted of the Clifton, Lieutenant Crocker; Sachem, Lieutenant Amos Johnson; Arizona, Acting-Master H. Tibbetts; and Granite City, Acting-Master C. W. Samson-all light-draft vessels. The expedition sailed on the 5th of September. Instead of following his instructions, to land lis troops below Sabine Pass, Franklin arranged with Crocker to have the gun-boats make a dirtember, the gun-boats and trans. ports crossed the bar at Sabine Pass, and in the afternoon the Clifton, Sachem, and Arizona, went up two separate channels to attack the fort (which mounted eight heavy guns, three of them rifled), leaving the Granite City to cover the landing of a division of troops, under General Weitzel, at a proper time. The Confederate garrison was ready for them, the expedition having been in sight for twenty-eight hours, and when the three gunboats were abreast the fort
Lake City (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ess these gangs of annoyers. An out-post was established several miles in the interior, held by the Nineteenth Iowa and Twenty-sixth Indiana, with two guns, under Colonel Lake, supported by one hundred and fifty cavalry under Colonel Montgomery. The whole number of men at the post was less than one thousand. These were surprised on a dark night by General Green, who stealthily crossed a bayou, Sept. 30, 1863. surrounded the camp, and captured the guns and a large portion of the infantry. Lake and about four hundred of his men became prisoners. Fifty-four were killed and wounded. The cavalry escaped with a loss of five men. A month later the Unionists of that region suffered another disaster. In order to mask his expedition against Texas by sea, Banks ordered General C. C. Washburne to advance from Brashear upon Opelousas, to give the impression that a march upon Alexandria or Shreveport was begun. Washburne reached Opelousas without resistance, but when, in obedience to ord
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
etly in his office, tracing a map of Southeastern Missouri, in perfect security as he supposed, for he did not think there was a National soldier within a hundred miles of him. Thompson was astonished, but not disconcerted. He declared it was too bad to interrupt him, for, if they had let him alone two weeks longer, he would have had three thousand men at his command. it was difficult to shield them from personal peril. Soon after the attack on Helena, See page 148. the surrender of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, and the retreat of Johnston from Jackson, See page 146. by which Grant's army was relieved from pressure, General Frederick Steele was sent to Helena to organize an expedition to capture Little Rock, the capital of Arkansas. His forces gathered there at the beginning of August numbered about six thousand men (including five hundred Indiana and Kansas cavalry), with twenty-two guns. He was soon joined by General Davidson (then operating in Arkansas, under the command o
Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
scaped into Arkansas. With a part of his force he took post at Batesville, on the White River, where he was attacked Feb. 4. by the Fourth Missouri Cavalry, Colonel G. E. Waring, and driven across the stream, with the loss of a colonel and several men made prisoners. At about the same time a small force, under Major Reeder, broke up Feb. 3. a band of guerrillas at Mingo Swamp, and killed their leader, McGee; and, on the 28th of the same month, Lieutenant-Colonel Stewart, scouting from Fayetteville (the National outpost in Northwestern Arkansas), with one hundred and thirty cavalry, captured, near Van Buren, on the Arkansas River, a Confederate steamer, with about three hundred prisoners. A month later, March 28. the steamer Sam Gaty, on the Missouri River, was captured at Sibley's Landing by a gang of guerrillas, led by George Todd, who committed great atrocities. They robbed the boat and all persons on board, and then murdered several of the white passengers, and about twenty ne
Matagorda Island (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
and, off Corpus Christi Bay, from which a force, under General T. E. G. Ransom, went to the Aranzas Pass, farther up the coast, and by a gallant assault Nov. 18, 1863. carried the Confederate works there, and captured one hundred prisoners. Corpus Christi was occupied by National troops the same day. Then a force, under General Washburne (then commanding the Thirteenth Army Corps), moved upon Pass Cavallo, at the entrance to Matagorda Bay, where the Confederates had a strong fort, called Esperanza, garrisoned by two thousand men of all arms. It was invested, and, after a sharp action, the Confederates blew up their magazine and fled, Nov. 30. most of the garrison escaping. These important conquests, achieved in the space of a month, promised a speedy closing of the coast of Texas to blockade-runners, and great advantage to the Union cause in that region. No place of importance on that coast was now left to the Confederates, excepting at the mouth of the Brazos and on Galveston
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