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Princeton, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
The National loss was two hundred and fifty men. The negro servants of the officers were butchered after the surrender. The Confederate loss was estimated at full six hundred. Steele now felt it necessary to retreat to Little Rock, for he was informed that Fagan was marching on that place, and that E. Kirby Smith had heavily re-enforced Price. He accordingly threw his army across the Washita on the night of the 26th of April, and at daylight the next morning began a retreat by way of Princeton and Jenkinson's Ferry, on the Sabine River. At the latter place he was attacked April 30. by an overwhelming force, led by Kirby Smith in person. Steele's troops were nearly famished, having eaten but little since they left Camden, and were exceedingly weary. A part of them had already crossed the river, when the foe struck the Thirty-third Iowa, Colonel Mackey, covering the rear, a very heavy blow. The Fiftieth Indiana pressed forward to its aid, when both were pushed back behind the
Matagorda Bay (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ing: There seems to have been an especial Providence looking out for us, in providing a man [Colonel Bailey] equal to the emergency. . . . This proposition looked like madness, and the best engineers ridiculed it, but Colonel Bailey was so sanguine of success, that I requested General Banks to have it done. While the army was detained at Alexandria on account of the fleet, it was re-enforced April 29. by a large portion of the troops that had been garrisoning ports in the vicinity of Matagorda Bay, on the Texan coast. 2 See page 224. They were led by General John A. McClernand, who left General Fitz-Henry Warren in command of the remainder at Matagorda. These posts had been evacuated by order of General Grant; and McClernand was soon followed by Warren, who likewise ascended the Red River, until stopped by Confederate batteries, when he fell back to the remains of Fort de Russy, and took post there. Banks had also received a dispatch from Halleck, in the name of General Grant
Covington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ee, with their effects, from the vengeance of the Confederates. Caution marked the advance, for the Confederates were hovering near, and swarming on the banks below. A week before the expedition moved, the gun-boats Signal and Covington, convoying the transport Warren down the river, the three bearing about four hundred soldiers, were fired upon May 5. at Dunn's Bayou, thirty miles below Alexandria, by a large Confederate force, at the morning twilight, and were so badly injured that the Covington was abandoned and burnt, and the other two vessels were surrendered. Of the soldiers, about one hundred and fifty were captured, and about one hundred were killed. The remainder took to the shore and escaped. Soon afterward, the City Belle, with a little more than four hundred Ohio troops, was captured by another guerrilla party, when about one-half of them escaped. But the army in its march for Simms' Port met with very little opposition, excepting by a considerable force of Confede
Grand Ecore (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
oats could ascend the river no farther than Grand Ecore, and from that point all supplies had to bet Sabine Cross Roads, fifty-four miles from Grand Ecore. General Lee had already encountered thend there General Banks, who had remained at Grand Ecore until all the troops had left, reached the were sent some distance on the road toward Grand Ecore, so as to be out of the way of danger in thral Smith, it was determined to retire upon Grand Ecore the following day, to the great disappointmfor the troops and flotilla to fall back to Grand Ecore as quickly as possible. Obedience was a didestruction of the vessels and troops above Grand Ecore. The banks of the river, at its turns, wernks and all the land troops had returned to Grand Ecore, when a part of them were sent six miles upfound most of his larger vessels aground at Grand Ecore, some of them drawing a foot more water tha in getting all his vessels over the bar at Grand Ecore, and then went down the river April 17. to[7 more...]
Fort Smith (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ssissippi. Let us now see what the Seventh Army Corps, under General Steele, was doing in the way of co-operation with the Red River expedition while it was in progress. General Steele was at his Headquarters at Little Rock when that expedition moved. On the 23d of March 1864. he started southward, on the military road, with about eight thousand troops, horse and foot, the former commanded by General Carr. On the previous day General Thayer, commanding the Army of the Frontier, left Fort Smith with about five thousand men, for the purpose of joining Steele at Arkadelphia; and Colonel Clayton marched from Pine Bluff with a small force to the left of Steele, in the direction of Camden, a place held and well fortified by the Confederates. That was Steele's first objective, for Sterling Price, with a considerable force, was holding a line from that place westward to Washington, the capital of Hempstead County. It was necessary to dispose of this force before marching toward Shreve
Sabine Pass (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. Object of the Red River expedition, 251. plan of the expedition, 252. land and naval forces for the expedition, at Simms's Port, 253. the expedition to Alexandria Franklin's overland March the rapids at Alexandria, 254. advance from Alexandria threatening dangers, 255. advance upon Shreveport, 256. the Trans-Mississippi Confederate Army approach to Sabine cross Roads, 257. battle at Sabine cross-roads, 258. battle of Pleasant Grove, 259. battle of Pleasant Hill, 261. retreat of the Nationals to Grand Ecore ordered, 262. retreat of the War vessels impeded, 263. the Army and Navy at Grand Ecore, 264. battle at Cane River, 265. a fight on the Red River, 266. the Red River Dam, 267. passage of the Red River rapids, 268. end of the Shreveport or Red River expedition, 269. General Steele's Army in Arkanass battle at Jenkinson's Ferry, 272. Steele's Army at little Rock, 273. Let us now look across the Mississippi Riv
Pleasant Hill (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ce, driving them before him, until he had passed Pleasant Hill two or three miles, when he found the main body ck's Bayou, near Carroll's farm, nine miles from Pleasant Hill, and there Lee halted. His loss in the engagemehat the firing had ceased. Franklin advanced to Pleasant Hill and encamped, and there General Banks, who had rant Grove, he thought it prudent to fall back to Pleasant Hill, fifteen miles in the rear, for the Confederatesorce, and a line of battle was at once formed at Pleasant Hill to receive them. General Smith had arrived the ravine which ran north of the little village of Pleasant Hill; his Second, General Millan, in the center; and g a thickly-wooded acclivity half a mile west of Pleasant Hill, upon and around which the main body of the Unioallantly as they were pushed up the acclivity of Pleasant Hill, suffering heavily until they filed behind Shaw'at Sabine Cross Roads, followed by an order from Pleasant Hill for the troops and flotilla to fall back to Gran
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
for Sterling Price, with a considerable force, was holding a line from that place westward to Washington, the capital of Hempstead County. It was necessary to dispose of this force before marching twhat worn by fatigue, but, after waiting two days for Thayer, he pushed on in the direction of Washington, for the purpose of flanking Camden, and drawing Price out of his fortifications there. He en of April, when he found Price in strong force across his path at Prairie d'anne, not far from Washington, prepared to make a decided stand. Steele had been joined by Thayer, and he readily accepted he next day, and at the dawn of the 12th attempted to turn their flank, when they retreated to Washington, pursued for several miles by cavalry. Steele now heard of the disaster to the Union troops at Sabine Cross Roads, See page 258. and, instead of pursuing Price toward Washington, turned sharply toward Camden. The Confederates quickly perceived his purpose, and, stimulated to stronger ac
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
e three bearing about four hundred soldiers, were fired upon May 5. at Dunn's Bayou, thirty miles below Alexandria, by a large Confederate force, at the morning twilight, and were so badly injured that the Covington was abandoned and burnt, and the other two vessels were surrendered. Of the soldiers, about one hundred and fifty were captured, and about one hundred were killed. The remainder took to the shore and escaped. Soon afterward, the City Belle, with a little more than four hundred Ohio troops, was captured by another guerrilla party, when about one-half of them escaped. But the army in its march for Simms' Port met with very little opposition, excepting by a considerable force of Confederate cavalry, who, at daybreak on the 16th, confronted its advance at Mansura, near Marksville, where the National skirmishers and artillery, after pushing the foe back across an open prairie to a wood, kept up a fire for about three hours, until the main body came up. A battle-line was t
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
passed over in the course of a few hours, before the water became too shallow. General Banks's Report. The damage to the dam was partially repaired. It was also strengthened by wing dams, and, on the 12th of May, when it was completed, and the vessels above had been lightened, they all passed into the deeper water below with safety, before eight o'clock the next morning. Then Admiral Porter wrote May 16, 1864. to the Secretary of the Navy, saying: There seems to have been an especial Providence looking out for us, in providing a man [Colonel Bailey] equal to the emergency. . . . This proposition looked like madness, and the best engineers ridiculed it, but Colonel Bailey was so sanguine of success, that I requested General Banks to have it done. While the army was detained at Alexandria on account of the fleet, it was re-enforced April 29. by a large portion of the troops that had been garrisoning ports in the vicinity of Matagorda Bay, on the Texan coast. 2 See page 224.
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