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Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
be so made that, from resting, the troops can quickly join and form in line of battle. In camping, the tents should be disposed so that each battalion, brigade, division, etc. can form from its camp at once in line or in order for marching; advanced guards, posts, and pickets should be disposed, and the distances from the main body should be calculated the same as for columns in marching — that is, that the army should have time to assemble and form for battle. The disposition for camps will be found in all army regulations; and this, as well as the cantoning of troops, being the special mission of the officers of the general staff, it would be useless to say more here concerning it. I trust that this summary will suffice to give the reader a general but a clear idea of the great operations of war. For special study, the works of General Jomini, Ternay, Frederick II., Archduke Charles, Loyd, Clausewitz, the Memoirs of Napoleon, Marshal Marmont, etc. etc. should be consulted
Eckmuhl (Bavaria, Germany) (search for this): chapter 11
h other prompt assistance. The battalions in the marching columns must be at the necessary distance for deployment, or, in general, to form in line of battle without disorder. If the army is large, so that several corps may be formed, they should be disposed as shown in Figs. 3 or 4, Plate V. If the enemy attacks the advanced guard, he offers his own flank to the corps already more advanced or still behind. Davoust, while retreating from Ratisbon, before the battles of Abensberg, Eckmuhl, etc., formed in a similar way; he executed his march between the Austrian force and the Danube. The flank march of General Radetski, in 1848, from Verona to Mantua, is also remarkable. By manoeuvre marches we understand marches executed by large armies, and having more of a strategical object than a tactical one; they are, in fact, strategical flank marches. I will give the dispositions for marching as used by Napoleon at Ulm in 1805, and at Jena in 1806. Each of the corps designat
Austria (Austria) (search for this): chapter 11
its base, and all the corps are so disposed that they can easily assist each other. Lannes forms the advanced guard of the whole army, and, by his arrival in front of the Prussians, keeps them in their position till Davoust arrives at Naumburg. If the Prussians attack him, their loss only becomes more certain, as the decisive point is Naumburg. The result of these marches and manoeuvres was the total loss of the Prussian army. March and manoeuvre of Napoleon near Ulm, 1805. The Austrian general, Mack, with from 70,000 to 80,000 men, advanced from the Austrian frontier as far as Ulm. Napoleon's army, arriving from Wurzburg, Mayence, Spire, and Kehl, numbered 180,000 men. This army was not directed against Ulm, but against the lower towns on the Danube. The arrangement of the columns is similar to that on a flank march. Ney formed the flank guard, and Soult the advanced guard; the different corps were from 5 to 10 miles distant from each other, and the whole front of
Ulm (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
irely separated from its base, and all the corps are so disposed that they can easily assist each other. Lannes forms the advanced guard of the whole army, and, by his arrival in front of the Prussians, keeps them in their position till Davoust arrives at Naumburg. If the Prussians attack him, their loss only becomes more certain, as the decisive point is Naumburg. The result of these marches and manoeuvres was the total loss of the Prussian army. March and manoeuvre of Napoleon near Ulm, 1805. The Austrian general, Mack, with from 70,000 to 80,000 men, advanced from the Austrian frontier as far as Ulm. Napoleon's army, arriving from Wurzburg, Mayence, Spire, and Kehl, numbered 180,000 men. This army was not directed against Ulm, but against the lower towns on the Danube. The arrangement of the columns is similar to that on a flank march. Ney formed the flank guard, and Soult the advanced guard; the different corps were from 5 to 10 miles distant from each other, an
Ratisbon (Bavaria, Germany) (search for this): chapter 11
uld be near enough to be able to render each other prompt assistance. The battalions in the marching columns must be at the necessary distance for deployment, or, in general, to form in line of battle without disorder. If the army is large, so that several corps may be formed, they should be disposed as shown in Figs. 3 or 4, Plate V. If the enemy attacks the advanced guard, he offers his own flank to the corps already more advanced or still behind. Davoust, while retreating from Ratisbon, before the battles of Abensberg, Eckmuhl, etc., formed in a similar way; he executed his march between the Austrian force and the Danube. The flank march of General Radetski, in 1848, from Verona to Mantua, is also remarkable. By manoeuvre marches we understand marches executed by large armies, and having more of a strategical object than a tactical one; they are, in fact, strategical flank marches. I will give the dispositions for marching as used by Napoleon at Ulm in 1805, and at
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
s: march and Manoeuvres of Napoleon near Jena, 1806. the operations near Jena were the following:-- The Prussian army, numbering 120,000 men, was thus disposed: 20,000 near Eisenach, 50,000 near Erfurth, and 50,000 men near Blankenhain. Napoleon's army was near Bamberg, and amounted to from 170,000 to 180,000 men. Napoleon determined to cut the Prussians entirely from their base of operation. For this, he advanced in three columns--one in the direction from Coburg to Sahlfeld, anotht of these marches and manoeuvres was the total loss of the Prussian army. March and manoeuvre of Napoleon near Ulm, 1805. The Austrian general, Mack, with from 70,000 to 80,000 men, advanced from the Austrian frontier as far as Ulm. Napoleon's army, arriving from Wurzburg, Mayence, Spire, and Kehl, numbered 180,000 men. This army was not directed against Ulm, but against the lower towns on the Danube. The arrangement of the columns is similar to that on a flank march. Ney formed
Coburg (Bavaria, Germany) (search for this): chapter 11
st to it. Examples: march and Manoeuvres of Napoleon near Jena, 1806. the operations near Jena were the following:-- The Prussian army, numbering 120,000 men, was thus disposed: 20,000 near Eisenach, 50,000 near Erfurth, and 50,000 men near Blankenhain. Napoleon's army was near Bamberg, and amounted to from 170,000 to 180,000 men. Napoleon determined to cut the Prussians entirely from their base of operation. For this, he advanced in three columns--one in the direction from Coburg to Sahlfeld, another at Kronach and Sahlburg, and a third at Hof and Plauen. The extreme left of the Prussians was at Schleitz. It was outflanked by the last column, and repulsed by the column in the center. On the 12th the greater part of the army arrived at Gera, and on the 13th, in the evening, the different army corps occupied the following positions:-- General Angereau at Kahla, 10 miles from Jena, and 7 from Ney, who was at Rohda, 9 miles from Jena; Lannes at Jena; the Guard
Kehl (Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany) (search for this): chapter 11
the Prussians, keeps them in their position till Davoust arrives at Naumburg. If the Prussians attack him, their loss only becomes more certain, as the decisive point is Naumburg. The result of these marches and manoeuvres was the total loss of the Prussian army. March and manoeuvre of Napoleon near Ulm, 1805. The Austrian general, Mack, with from 70,000 to 80,000 men, advanced from the Austrian frontier as far as Ulm. Napoleon's army, arriving from Wurzburg, Mayence, Spire, and Kehl, numbered 180,000 men. This army was not directed against Ulm, but against the lower towns on the Danube. The arrangement of the columns is similar to that on a flank march. Ney formed the flank guard, and Soult the advanced guard; the different corps were from 5 to 10 miles distant from each other, and the whole front of operations was from 45 to 50 miles in length. Wherever Mack attacks, he finds the corps he attacks always supported, in less than three hours, by two or three March
Verona (Italy) (search for this): chapter 11
le without disorder. If the army is large, so that several corps may be formed, they should be disposed as shown in Figs. 3 or 4, Plate V. If the enemy attacks the advanced guard, he offers his own flank to the corps already more advanced or still behind. Davoust, while retreating from Ratisbon, before the battles of Abensberg, Eckmuhl, etc., formed in a similar way; he executed his march between the Austrian force and the Danube. The flank march of General Radetski, in 1848, from Verona to Mantua, is also remarkable. By manoeuvre marches we understand marches executed by large armies, and having more of a strategical object than a tactical one; they are, in fact, strategical flank marches. I will give the dispositions for marching as used by Napoleon at Ulm in 1805, and at Jena in 1806. Each of the corps designated in the plan was of three divisions, and in the manoeuvres at Ulm that of Ney was of five. In these marches the force of each army corps, and the distance
Jena (Thuringia, Germany) (search for this): chapter 11
marching as used by Napoleon at Ulm in 1805, and at Jena in 1806. Each of the corps designated in the plan w Examples: march and Manoeuvres of Napoleon near Jena, 1806. the operations near Jena were the followinJena were the following:-- The Prussian army, numbering 120,000 men, was thus disposed: 20,000 near Eisenach, 50,000 near Erfurthtions:-- General Angereau at Kahla, 10 miles from Jena, and 7 from Ney, who was at Rohda, 9 miles from JenaJena; Lannes at Jena; the Guard followed Lannes; Soult on a parallel road to Jena, about 10 miles from this place,Jena; the Guard followed Lannes; Soult on a parallel road to Jena, about 10 miles from this place, and 6 to 7 from the Guard; Davoust, Bernadotte, and Murat arrive at Naumburg, from whence Bernadotte has to mJena, about 10 miles from this place, and 6 to 7 from the Guard; Davoust, Bernadotte, and Murat arrive at Naumburg, from whence Bernadotte has to march, on the 14th, to Dornburg, and Davoust to Apolda. A part of the cavalry is still at Auma, and the BavariFrench right flank. Naumburg is about 18 miles from Jena. If we consider this disposition, we shall find ttwo or three Marches and Manoeuvres of Napoleon at Jena. 13, 14 October, 1806. other corps; and, besides,
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