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have been many of them small, and one of them, at least, exceedingly dirty — to say nothing of piquant scandals in the neighboring diocese of Pennsylvania. To the Protestant Episcopal Church is unquestionably due the reverence of some of us and the respect of others; but Heaven knows there is nothing in its history, nothing in its present position which justifies this sublime scorn of political affairs which Dr. Hawks professes. In England, from the days of Henry VIII. to the days of Victoria, the Church has been quite as much a political as a religious body — its Bishops have been courtiers, and sometimes generals — it has been a political institution in Scotland and in Ireland — the reigning monarch has been its legal head — among its clergy have figured the keenest and most unscrupulous politicians, while for the last twenty-five years, though Land has been in his coffin for more than two centuries, this Church which never meddles with little questions, has been well-nigh
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 75
his is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. Nine. Shall a Church which every Sunday prays the Good Lord to deliver us from all sedition, privy conspiracy and rebellion, and to give to all nations unity, peace and concord, still hold communion with a Church which is full of sedition, privy conspiracy and rebellion against the unity, peace and concord of the land? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. Ten. Shall a Church which every Sunday prays for the President of the United States, and all others in authority --not merely as fellow-men, but because they are in authority --shall the Church withhold its censure of those of its members, who in contempt of authority are waging a felonious war against law and order? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. Eleven. Whether, finally, these communicants of the Church in the rebel States who have been so disregardful of its discipline, and so false to its teachings as to avowedly violate all laws Divine and huma
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 75
nday, Dr. Hawks, arguing that the Church must treat its rebellious children with lenity, courtesy and affection, used the following language: We must not lug in all the little dirty questions of the day which will be buried with their agitation. One might retort upon Dr. Hawks that the questions which have disturbed the diocese for some years past, have been many of them small, and one of them, at least, exceedingly dirty — to say nothing of piquant scandals in the neighboring diocese of Pennsylvania. To the Protestant Episcopal Church is unquestionably due the reverence of some of us and the respect of others; but Heaven knows there is nothing in its history, nothing in its present position which justifies this sublime scorn of political affairs which Dr. Hawks professes. In England, from the days of Henry VIII. to the days of Victoria, the Church has been quite as much a political as a religious body — its Bishops have been courtiers, and sometimes generals — it has been a pol<
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 75
which have disturbed the diocese for some years past, have been many of them small, and one of them, at least, exceedingly dirty — to say nothing of piquant scandals in the neighboring diocese of Pennsylvania. To the Protestant Episcopal Church is unquestionably due the reverence of some of us and the respect of others; but Heaven knows there is nothing in its history, nothing in its present position which justifies this sublime scorn of political affairs which Dr. Hawks professes. In England, from the days of Henry VIII. to the days of Victoria, the Church has been quite as much a political as a religious body — its Bishops have been courtiers, and sometimes generals — it has been a political institution in Scotland and in Ireland — the reigning monarch has been its legal head — among its clergy have figured the keenest and most unscrupulous politicians, while for the last twenty-five years, though Land has been in his coffin for more than two centuries, this Church which n
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 75
ant Episcopal Church is unquestionably due the reverence of some of us and the respect of others; but Heaven knows there is nothing in its history, nothing in its present position which justifies this sublime scorn of political affairs which Dr. Hawks professes. In England, from the days of Henry VIII. to the days of Victoria, the Church has been quite as much a political as a religious body — its Bishops have been courtiers, and sometimes generals — it has been a political institution in Scotland and in Ireland — the reigning monarch has been its legal head — among its clergy have figured the keenest and most unscrupulous politicians, while for the last twenty-five years, though Land has been in his coffin for more than two centuries, this Church which never meddles with little questions, has been well-nigh sundered upon points of architecture, of upholstery, of tailoring, of genuflexions and of decorations; while in America we have had petty reproductions of the same differences,
urch is unquestionably due the reverence of some of us and the respect of others; but Heaven knows there is nothing in its history, nothing in its present position which justifies this sublime scorn of political affairs which Dr. Hawks professes. In England, from the days of Henry VIII. to the days of Victoria, the Church has been quite as much a political as a religious body — its Bishops have been courtiers, and sometimes generals — it has been a political institution in Scotland and in Ireland — the reigning monarch has been its legal head — among its clergy have figured the keenest and most unscrupulous politicians, while for the last twenty-five years, though Land has been in his coffin for more than two centuries, this Church which never meddles with little questions, has been well-nigh sundered upon points of architecture, of upholstery, of tailoring, of genuflexions and of decorations; while in America we have had petty reproductions of the same differences, with the disgus
America (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 75
gh Land has been in his coffin for more than two centuries, this Church which never meddles with little questions, has been well-nigh sundered upon points of architecture, of upholstery, of tailoring, of genuflexions and of decorations; while in America we have had petty reproductions of the same differences, with the disgusting spectacle of a Right Reverend Father in God, riding, all booted and spurred, at the head of his rebel regiments. After this, to find Dr. Hawks so delicately squeamish and so doubtful about the authority of the Church in public affairs, must excite commiseration both for his stomach and his understanding. Shall the United State of America be deprived of an immense territory acquired at a cost of blood and treasure absolutely incomputable? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. One. Shall the Constitution of the United States be overthrown by the perjuries of its sworn defenders? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. Two. Shall th
much like to know what in the opinion of the Rev. Dr. Hawks constitutes a large and clean question. with their agitation. One might retort upon Dr. Hawks that the questions which have disturbed the d treasure absolutely incomputable? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. One. Shall e perjuries of its sworn defenders? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. Two. Shall t hope of indemnity or of security? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. Three. Shalience to the edicts of an autocrat? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. Five. Shalla fanaticism analogous to idolatry? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. Seven. Shal the laborer is worthy of his hire? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. Eight. Shalnsure and even its excommunication? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. Nine. Shallelonious war against law and order? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. Eleven. Whe[6 more...]
een its legal head — among its clergy have figured the keenest and most unscrupulous politicians, while for the last twenty-five years, though Land has been in his coffin for more than two centuries, this Church which never meddles with little questions, has been well-nigh sundered upon points of architecture, of upholstery, of tailoring, of genuflexions and of decorations; while in America we have had petty reproductions of the same differences, with the disgusting spectacle of a Right Reverend Father in God, riding, all booted and spurred, at the head of his rebel regiments. After this, to find Dr. Hawks so delicately squeamish and so doubtful about the authority of the Church in public affairs, must excite commiseration both for his stomach and his understanding. Shall the United State of America be deprived of an immense territory acquired at a cost of blood and treasure absolutely incomputable? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. One. Shall the Constitution of
October 11th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 75
Church which is full of sedition, privy conspiracy and rebellion against the unity, peace and concord of the land? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. Ten. Shall a Church which every Sunday prays for the President of the United States, and all others in authority --not merely as fellow-men, but because they are in authority --shall the Church withhold its censure of those of its members, who in contempt of authority are waging a felonious war against law and order? This is Dr. Hawks's Little Dirty Question, No. Eleven. Whether, finally, these communicants of the Church in the rebel States who have been so disregardful of its discipline, and so false to its teachings as to avowedly violate all laws Divine and human, are entitled to anything more than Christian pity, are at all entitled in their double tort to Christian Fellowship, is a Little Dirty Question well worth the consideration of every Christian Patriot; and is Dr. Hawks's No. Twelve. October 11, 1862.