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tory of the war will tell. It may be supposed by those unfamiliar with the events of the times, that the rebellion was the result of measures forced upon the South just previous to the election of Abraham Lincoln, and that in his election they saw the death blow to the hopes they had cherished for extending slavery into new states and territories. If any one supposes that the rebellion was an impulsive measure, let him dismiss such an idea, for the writer was told by a Southern Senator in 1860, that, as far back as 1855, when the Colorado class of ships were built, he and others had voted to have them and all other vessels constructed of such a size and such a draft of water, that they could not enter any Southern ports; so it seems that the thought of secession had been maturing for years, and while Southern statesmen were apparently urging the building of large vessels instead of small ones, on the ground that the dignity of the Nation called for these cumbersome structures, it w
rn officers being true to the Government. It was a bad state of affairs for a Secretary to commence his administration with, but the eventful year, 1861-62, will show that the operations and achievements of the Navy were such, that great credit was reflected not only upon the Secretary but upon the personnel of the service, which so signally aided the Department in carrying out the measures tending so greatly to cripple the Confederate cause. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, 1861-69. It is only intended, in this narrative, to give a comprehensive history of the naval events of the war, so that the general reader can form a rapid idea as to the conduct of naval affairs, and understand how much the Navy had to do with putting down the rebellion — or, to use the language of the present day, in persuading our Southern brethren to come back into the Union. It is but justice to the Navy Department to explain to the reader the difficulties under which that branch of the Gover
est and most influential positions in the Navy came forward and offered their resignations, there was apparently no one upon whom the Secretary could rely; distrust seemed to pervade every branch of the naval service. No commander could be sure who would be faithful to the flag, and the Secretary of the Navy could not be certain of any Southern officers being true to the Government. It was a bad state of affairs for a Secretary to commence his administration with, but the eventful year, 1861-62, will show that the operations and achievements of the Navy were such, that great credit was reflected not only upon the Secretary but upon the personnel of the service, which so signally aided the Department in carrying out the measures tending so greatly to cripple the Confederate cause. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, 1861-69. It is only intended, in this narrative, to give a comprehensive history of the naval events of the war, so that the general reader can form a rapid id
the Government. It was a bad state of affairs for a Secretary to commence his administration with, but the eventful year, 1861-62, will show that the operations and achievements of the Navy were such, that great credit was reflected not only upon thrrying out the measures tending so greatly to cripple the Confederate cause. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, 1861-69. It is only intended, in this narrative, to give a comprehensive history of the naval events of the war, so that the r degree of economy, considering the vastness of the field of operations. Gustavus V. Fox, Ass't Secretary of the Navy, 1861-66. The administration of the Department was conducted with ability, which is the most convincing proof of the fitnessime in a worse condition than we were on the breaking out of the rebellion. If to-day events occurred similar to those of 1861, we would be in a worse condition to prevent them. Why does this settled purpose to keep the Navy down exist, when it was
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 1
Some there were who — rebels at heart and purpose — after holding for several years previous to the war high positions in the administration preceding that of Mr. Lincoln, had done all they could to dispose of the Navy, so that it could not be used in the event of trouble between the North and the South. The object was to destroupposed by those unfamiliar with the events of the times, that the rebellion was the result of measures forced upon the South just previous to the election of Abraham Lincoln, and that in his election they saw the death blow to the hopes they had cherished for extending slavery into new states and territories. If any one supposes are of honors and emoluments, and had gained from the North compliance with urgent demands, which often passed the bounds of proper concession. From the time Mr. Lincoln became President, all the Southern ports were in the possession of Secessionists: they were sealed against our large ships, and open to blockade runners, which
y it was for the Secretary of the Navy to be provided with the means of purchasing ships, guns and supplies of all kinds, and it would be idle to say, in the light of results, that the Department did not put forth all the energy required on such an occasion--first, by gaining the confidence of Congress, and, by using the large amounts intrusted to its charge with a fair degree of economy, considering the vastness of the field of operations. Gustavus V. Fox, Ass't Secretary of the Navy, 1861-66. The administration of the Department was conducted with ability, which is the most convincing proof of the fitness of its officers for the important duties they were called upon to perform. It would be untrue to say that such results as happened could have been achieved by persons of ordinary capacity, or that the head of such a combination of officers was deficient in the qualities necessary to control so many grave matters as came within his jurisdiction. The communications that wer
It may be supposed by those unfamiliar with the events of the times, that the rebellion was the result of measures forced upon the South just previous to the election of Abraham Lincoln, and that in his election they saw the death blow to the hopes they had cherished for extending slavery into new states and territories. If any one supposes that the rebellion was an impulsive measure, let him dismiss such an idea, for the writer was told by a Southern Senator in 1860, that, as far back as 1855, when the Colorado class of ships were built, he and others had voted to have them and all other vessels constructed of such a size and such a draft of water, that they could not enter any Southern ports; so it seems that the thought of secession had been maturing for years, and while Southern statesmen were apparently urging the building of large vessels instead of small ones, on the ground that the dignity of the Nation called for these cumbersome structures, it was really for the purpose o
Gideon Welles (search for this): chapter 1
erates had ample time to prepare to meet them with offensive weapons, and keep them out of Southern ports. When Mr. Toucey handed over the Navy Department to Mr. Welles, it was in a rather demoralized condition--Southern officers were resigning right and left, officers of the bureaux, even, were talking of going with their Staton the personnel of the service, which so signally aided the Department in carrying out the measures tending so greatly to cripple the Confederate cause. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, 1861-69. It is only intended, in this narrative, to give a comprehensive history of the naval events of the war, so that the generof the Department; while the Chief Clerk,Mr. Faxon, was placed at the head of the Civil Corps; he was really the representative of the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Gideon Welles. This organization was found necessary, owing to the defective system then existing, which exists now, and which will be found defective again if we shoul
Gustavus V. Fox (search for this): chapter 1
break of the civil war. what could have been done. blockade runners. loss to the Confederacy. prizes. naval triumphs. faithful officers. Gideon Wells. Gustavus V. Fox. lavish praise of the Army. unprepared for war. Premeditated secession. separate government the Navy and the happy condition of affairs now existing, &C.rs pertaining particularly to the Navy, the other embracing civil transactions, together with the whole business machinery and operations of the Department. Mr. G. V. Fox, who had formerly been an officer of the Navy, was placed at the head of the first named branch of the Department; while the Chief Clerk,Mr. Faxon, was placed ce of Congress, and, by using the large amounts intrusted to its charge with a fair degree of economy, considering the vastness of the field of operations. Gustavus V. Fox, Ass't Secretary of the Navy, 1861-66. The administration of the Department was conducted with ability, which is the most convincing proof of the fitness
April 12th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1
attending the execution of these requirements, the highest praise cannot be withheld from those who managed its operations. Every man who held position of honor and trust in the Navy Department in those trying times is dead and gone, and the multiplying events of a quarter of a century have crowded out for a time the great works which emanated from their conjoint exertions; but those who will take the trouble to hunt up and read over the documentary history of the times, will find ample evidence that to the Navy Department and the Navy is the present generation largely indebted for the happy condition of affairs now existing in a united country — a prosperity never exceeded in the history of the land — and the most substantial proofs that the Navy will always be found foremost to support this union of States, no matter what may be the sacrifices made by its officers and other personnel. Attack on Fort Sumter by the Secessionists, April 12, 1861--Fort Moultrie in the Foregro
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