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Southwestern States (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
at had early in the war commenced to swarm upon the coast like bees about the honey flowers. But they were disappointed in their expectations, for as early as June, 1861, Commodore McKean sent the Powhatan, Lieut. D. D. Porter, to close up the Southwest Pass of the Mississippi, and Commander U. S. Sloop of war Brooklyn, off Pensacola. Charles Poor, in the Brooklyn, to blockade Pass à l'outre. It was through the latter channel that the Sumter, Captain Semmes, escaped to sea, while the neared the head of the passes, when ineffectual attempts were made to get her head up stream (which could easily have been done by letting go an anchor). The vain efforts continued until the steamships had drifted a mile and a half down the Southwest Pass, when they were discontinued, the helm put up, and the vessel headed towards Pilottown, where her commander thought he would be able to turn round! When she arrived at Pilottown she still drifted on, and strange to say, she drifted towa
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): chapter 10
ppointed to blockade the different passes. The river Mississippi divides into several channels before reaching the Gulf of Mexico, and this division takes place at a point simply known as the head of the passes, about fifteen miles above the mouthoffers one of the most curious commentaries on the conduct of the war in this quarter. It had the best harbor in the Gulf of Mexico, belonging to the United States. It had a good navy yard, with the ordinary facilities for fitting out and repairings. This is an important part of the history of the war, and as it had an important bearing on naval matters in the Gulf of Mexico, and exhibited a great want of decision or forgetfulness on the part of those who were charged with the duty of recovof the United States authorizing the former to take any vessel whatever in commission, and proceed immediately to the Gulf of Mexico. This order did not pass through the Navy Department, and was unknown to the Secretary of the Navy, and when signe
Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ad the best harbor in the Gulf of Mexico, belonging to the United States. It had a good navy yard, with the ordinary facilities for fitting out and repairing ships, and water enough on the bar to admit of the passage of all but five or six of the heaviest ships of the Navy. It was just the point wanted by our naval commanders from which to carry on operations against New Orleans and the coast of Louisiana and Texas, and from which to intercept blockade runners bound for Southern ports from Havana and Nassau. Before even Fort Sumter was fired on President Lincoln saw the importance of our holding Fort Pickens, and at the same time that Secretary Welles sent his expedition to reinforce Sumter, the President and Secretary Seward sent one to reinforce Fort. Pickens and prevent it from falling into the hands of the insurgents. This is an important part of the history of the war, and as it had an important bearing on naval matters in the Gulf of Mexico, and exhibited a great want of
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
o charter a large steam transport that would carry 600 troops and stores, also artillery of all kinds, and with a naval vessel to protect the landing. Mr. Seward was new to all this kind of business, and was slow to act, though precious time was flying. Captain Meigs conferred with Lieut. D. D. Porter, who conceived the plan perfectly feasible, and showed a desire to go on the expedition: all of which was reported to the Secretary of State. Lieut. Porter was at that time under orders for California, and was to have left for New York to meet the California steamer on April 1st. In two or three hours he would have taken the train. A note was sent him at 2 P. M., notifying him that the Secretary of State wished to see him at his office immediately. On his arrival at the office the Secretary asked him if he knew how the Administration could prevent Fort Pickens from falling into the hands of the Confederates. He answered promptly that he did know, and then suggested the plan propos
Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
nd was unknown to the Secretary of the Navy, and when signed by the President he was not conscious that his signature would deprive me of the means to accomplish an object which he held to be of such vital importance. To tell the rest of this history we must further quote Mr. Fox's report: The tug Freeborn was not permitted to leave New York; the tug Uncle Ben was driven into Wilmington by the violence of the gale and eventually captured by the Confederates; the tug Yankee reached Charlestown a few hours after the Baltic left for New York with Major Anderson's command on board. Mr. Fox from his statement seems to have relied on the Powhatan to assist him, and considers her absence to be the cause of failure. On the 2d of April he had not even received the written authority to undertake this expedition, and no decision had been come to by the President until April the 4th, and it was not until the morning of April 6th that a telegraphic dispatch was received by Captain F
Santa Rosa (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
such facilities as he may deem necessary for getting to sea as soon as possible. He will select the officers who are to accompany him. Abraham Lincoln. Recommended, Wm. H. Seward. Executive Mansion, April 1st, 1861. Lieut. D. D. Porter, U. S. Navy: Sir: You will proceed to New York and with the least possible delay assume command of any naval steamer available. Proceed to Pensacola Harbor, and at any cost or risk prevent any expedition from the mainland reaching Fort Pickens or Santa Rosa. You will exhibit this order to any naval officer at Pensacola if you deem it necessary after you have established yourself within the harbor, and will request co-operation by the entrance of at least one other vessel. This order, its object, and your destination will be communicated to no person whatever until you reach the H arbor of Pensacola. Abraham Lincoln. Recommended, Wm. H. Seward. Washington City, April 1st, 1861. Sir: Circumstances render it necessary to place in
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
r consultation with General Harvey Brown at Fort Pickens, determined to make an attack on Fort McRaet Lincoln saw the importance of our holding Fort Pickens, and at the same time that Secretary Welles, and on April 6th sailed for the relief of Fort Pickens, under the command of Lieut D. D. Porter. e knew how the Administration could prevent Fort Pickens from falling into the hands of the Confeder the 17th of April the Powhatan arrived off Fort Pickens and found that the chartered steamer Atlantns of war sufficient to withstand a seige. Fort Pickens could now bid defiance to the Confederate s of the attack of the Niagara, Richmond and Fort Pickens on Fort McRae and other forts, Nov. 22, 186 fact, viz.: that the expedition to relieve Fort Pickens was all useless, as he had provided againstdron to hold himself in readiness to assist Fort Pickens in case it was threatened. He, however, dihe Navy Department with the merit of saving Fort Pickens to the Union, and the same authority attemp[30 more...]
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ertain by the visit something that would strengthen his argument. He also wished if possible to visit Major Anderson. In consequence, with the consent of the President, Secretary of War and General Scott, he proceeded by way of Richmond and Wilmington to Charleston and arrived there on the 25th of March. At that time there was a general feeling in Charleston and thereabout that the Government had concluded to give up Fort Sumter without an attempt to retain it. On Mr. Fox's arrival in Chmeans to accomplish an object which he held to be of such vital importance. To tell the rest of this history we must further quote Mr. Fox's report: The tug Freeborn was not permitted to leave New York; the tug Uncle Ben was driven into Wilmington by the violence of the gale and eventually captured by the Confederates; the tug Yankee reached Charlestown a few hours after the Baltic left for New York with Major Anderson's command on board. Mr. Fox from his statement seems to have reli
Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
harbor in the Gulf of Mexico, belonging to the United States. It had a good navy yard, with the ordinary facilities for fitting out and repairing ships, and water enough on the bar to admit of the passage of all but five or six of the heaviest ships of the Navy. It was just the point wanted by our naval commanders from which to carry on operations against New Orleans and the coast of Louisiana and Texas, and from which to intercept blockade runners bound for Southern ports from Havana and Nassau. Before even Fort Sumter was fired on President Lincoln saw the importance of our holding Fort Pickens, and at the same time that Secretary Welles sent his expedition to reinforce Sumter, the President and Secretary Seward sent one to reinforce Fort. Pickens and prevent it from falling into the hands of the insurgents. This is an important part of the history of the war, and as it had an important bearing on naval matters in the Gulf of Mexico, and exhibited a great want of decision o
Pensacola (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
etween the Federal and Confederate forces at Pensacola. Both the Niagara and Richmond were vessedment. The history of the manner in which Pensacola was held by the Confederates from April 1st,ard the fort, as had been done at Sumter. Pensacola, with its well-equipped Navy Yard, was too tl exhibit this order to any naval officer at Pensacola if you deem it necessary after you have estarson whatever until you reach the H arbor of Pensacola. Abraham Lincoln. Recommended, Wm. H. Sewar was seen to be coming from the direction of Pensacola, and heading for the two ships lying outsidewisely decamped in time. Thus the harbor of Pensacola again fell into the hands of the Government,ssemble any number of troops they pleased at Pensacola, erect batteries, and prepare for any continapt. H. A. Adams, Commanding Naval Force off Pensacola. Sir — Your dispatch of April 1st is receded from the ships at that time anchored off Pensacola, and this help never would have been afforde[9 more...]
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