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Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 10
Before even Fort Sumter was fired on President Lincoln saw the importance of our holding Fort Pken to insure their success. Thus, when President Lincoln came into office he found himself face t. (signed) Gideon Welles. On April 1st President Lincoln wrote an order to put the Powhatan in co from the Fort Sumter relief expedition. Mr. Lincoln had been installed in the Presidential offict the officers who are to accompany him. Abraham Lincoln. Recommended, Wm. H. Seward. Execut the Government towards you, I remain, Abraham Lincoln. Captain Samuel Mercer, U. S. N. A true cartment the fact that she is fitting out. Abraham Lincoln. Washington, Executive Mansion, Aprd co-operating with him as he may desire. Abraham Lincoln. A true copy. M. C. Meigs, Chief Engineerdmit of. Give up the ship, Seward, said Mr. Lincoln, we will get another. And Mr. Seward conseofficer, and when Gen. Scott (subsequent to Mr. Lincoln's inauguration) sent an order to land the c[6 more...]
Edward Terry (search for this): chapter 10
tee. Captain, Henry Eagle; Surgeon, T. M. Potter; Lieuts., James E. Jouett, J. J. Mitchell. B. N. Wescott, James H. Spotts; Act.-Master's Mate, Charles W. Adams; Asst.-Surg., C. H. Burbank; Paymaster, L. Warrington; Midshipmen, Frederick Rodgers, George M. Brown, S. H. Hunt; Boatswain, William Black; Carpenter, Wm. H. Edgar; Gunner, William Carter; First Lieut. of Marines, C. D. Hebb. Steamer Richmond. Capt., F. B. Ellison; Lieuts., N. C. Bryant, A. B. Cummings, Robert Boyd, Jr., Edward Terry, Byron Wilson; Surgeon, A. A. Henderson; Asst.-Surgeon, William Howell; Paymaster, Geo. F. Cutter; Boatswain, I. T. Choate; Sailmaker, H. T. Stocker; Carpenter, H. L. Dixon; Gunner, James Thayer; Act.-Master's Mate, H. W. Grinnell; First Lieut. Marines, Alan Ramsey; Chief Engineer, John W. Moore; Asst.-Engineers, Eben Hoyt, J. L. Butler, Wm. Pollard, A. W. Morley, G. W. W. Dove, R. B. Plotts, C. E. Emery. Sloop-of-war Vincennes. Commander, Robert Handy; Lieut., John E. Hart; Surgeon
lan V. Reed; P. Asst.-Surgeon, P. S. Wales; Asst.-Engineers, Wm. C. Selden, Reynolds Driver, Edw. Scattergood, A. H. Able. Frigate Potomac. Capt., L. M. Powell, Lieuts., Samuel Marcy, Lewis A. Kimberly; Geo. E. Law; Master, W. S. Schley; Surgeon, J. D. Miller; Asst.-Surgeon, A. O. Leavitt; Paymaster, James D. Murray; Midshipmen, Wm. T. Sampson, C. H. Humphrey, Merrill Miller, John H. Reed, D. D. Wemple; Boatswain. C. E. Bragdon; Gunner, W. H. French; Carpenter, O. T. Stimson; Sailmaker, Geo. Thomas. Steamer Huntsville. Com. Cicero Price; Lieut., Henry Erben: Midshipmen, E. C. V. Blake, Louis Kempff. Steamer R. R. Cuyler. Lieut. Francis Winslow; Act.-Lieut., J. Van Ness Philip; Act.-Master, Henry K. Lapham; Midshipmen, L. R. P. Adams, A. C. Alexander, Wm. R. Bridgman. Steamer Hatteras. Com., Geo. F. Emmons; Act.-Master, Hoffman; Master's Mates, McGrath and Hazlett. Steamer Massachusetts. Com., Melancton Smith. Steamer New London. Com., James Alden.
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 10
ring the harbor and getting within range of the guns on Morris Island, she was fired upon, and finding that he would be sunk if he persevered in going on, Captain McGowan turned his vessel about and left the harbor. Mr. Fox presented certain plans for the relief of Sumter to the Buchanan administration, but for various reasons they were not accepted, although at first deemed feasible, even by General Scott. But on the next day (Febuary 5th, 1861) news was received of the election of Jefferson Davis to the Presidency of the Southern Confederacy, and then General Scott intimated to Mr. Fox that probably no efforts would be made to relieve Fort Sumter. On the 12th of March, Mr. Fox received a telegram from Postmaster-General Montgomery Blair to proceed to Washington; and when he arrived there he was induced by this gentleman to lay the same plans before President Lincoln that had been offered to President Buchanan, Mr. Blair informing Mr. Fox at the same time that General Scott ha
James Glynn (search for this): chapter 10
nan's cabinet, and as the no coercion party was in the majority he was influenced by this policy, and it was owing to it and to outside sympathizers that the President refused to re-enforce Sumter. These Southern sympathizers around the President left nothing undone to delude him with the idea of the impolicy of attempting to retain any of the Southern forts by force, and it was in consequence of these representations that the following telegram was sent on January 29, 1861: To Captain James Glynn, commanding the Macedonian; Capt. W. S. Walker, commanding the Brooklyn, or other naval officers in command; and Lieut. A. J. Slemmer, 1st Regt. Artillery, U. S. A., commanding Fort Pickens: In consequence of the assurances received from Mr. Mallory in a telegram of yesterday to Messrs. Bigler, Hunter and Slidell, with a request that it should be laid before the President, that Fort Pickens would not be assaulted, and the offer of such an assurance to the same effect from Col. Chas
R. O. Tyler (search for this): chapter 10
the arrival of the Powhatan. Finding that she did not appear he went in the offing and made signals all night, so that she might find the Baltic in case she should arrive. The morning of the 13th was thick and foggy with a very heavy ground swell on, and the Baltic, feeling her way in, ran aground on Rattlesnake Shoal, but got off without damage, and was obliged by the heavy swell to anchor in deep water, several miles outside of the Pawnee and Harriet Lane. One gallant army officer (R. O. Tyler), though suffering from seasickness, as were most of the troops, organized a boat's crew and exercised them for the purpose of having at least one boat (in the absence of the Powhatan) that could go to the relief of Fort Sumter--as if one boat pulled by raw recruits could ever even cross the bar, much less reach the fort under such a fire. But fortunately the adventure ended where it began, and no boat was sent. In the morning a great volume of black smoke burst forth from Fort Sumter
William W. McKean (search for this): chapter 10
ney flowers. But they were disappointed in their expectations, for as early as June, 1861, Commodore McKean sent the Powhatan, Lieut. D. D. Porter, to close up the Southwest Pass of the Mississippi, boat only, because the other one did not get alongside in time to be of much assistance. Captain McKean, who commanded the Gulf blockading squadron, issued a public order, thanking Lieut. Jouett ae which in former years shed so much lustre on the American flag. On November 22d, 1861, Commodore McKean. after consultation with General Harvey Brown at Fort Pickens, determined to make an attacr impregnable against Fort Pickens and the Union fleet. Had this action on the part of Flag Officer McKean and General Harvey Brown been concerted earlier in the year it might have had the good ef officers obtained mostly from Navy Register of August 31, 1861. Flagship Niagara. Captain Wm. W. McKean, Flag Officer; Lieuts., John Guest, Wm. F. Spicer, J. C. P. De Krafft, Robt. L. May and
Franklin Buchanan (search for this): chapter 10
ith Colonel Anderson, and return with the required information. The late administration of Mr. Buchanan, with a policy as feeble as it was unwise, had done nothing towards asserting the authority oattack him. The Southern leaders had been prepared for the contingency of secession before Mr. Buchanan gave up the reins of office. All their plans were well matured and all precautions taken to eamer Star-of-the-West, under Captain McGowan, of the Revenue Marine, was chartered during President Buchanan's administration, and ordered to carry provisions to the beleaguered fort; but on entering by this gentleman to lay the same plans before President Lincoln that had been offered to President Buchanan, Mr. Blair informing Mr. Fox at the same time that General Scott had advised the Presidentfar back as January, 1861, the question of State sovereignty and no coercion was discussed in Mr. Buchanan's cabinet, and as the no coercion party was in the majority he was influenced by this policy,
W. S. Walker (search for this): chapter 10
in the majority he was influenced by this policy, and it was owing to it and to outside sympathizers that the President refused to re-enforce Sumter. These Southern sympathizers around the President left nothing undone to delude him with the idea of the impolicy of attempting to retain any of the Southern forts by force, and it was in consequence of these representations that the following telegram was sent on January 29, 1861: To Captain James Glynn, commanding the Macedonian; Capt. W. S. Walker, commanding the Brooklyn, or other naval officers in command; and Lieut. A. J. Slemmer, 1st Regt. Artillery, U. S. A., commanding Fort Pickens: In consequence of the assurances received from Mr. Mallory in a telegram of yesterday to Messrs. Bigler, Hunter and Slidell, with a request that it should be laid before the President, that Fort Pickens would not be assaulted, and the offer of such an assurance to the same effect from Col. Chase, for the purpose of avoiding a hostile collisi
W. G. Anderson (search for this): chapter 10
ces to go to Charleston, communicate with Colonel Anderson, and return with the required informationrender, yet no steps were taken to relieve Major Anderson by sending reinforcements or supplies; norment. He also wished if possible to visit Major Anderson. In consequence, with the consent of thavy, and stated to him his desire to visit Major Anderson, and Hartstene in consequence introduced hved after dark and remained two hours. Major Anderson seemed to think it was too late then to unof supplies, and it was decided by him and Major Anderson that he could report to the government thashed. Mr. Fox made no arrangements with Major Anderson for reinforcing or supplying the fort, andwould arrive in New York and the time when Major Anderson would be out of provisions, when he would s plan was also abandoned, and on the 14th Major Anderson evacuated, and with his troops was taken nrs after the Baltic left for New York with Major Anderson's command on board. Mr. Fox from his s[2 more...]
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