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Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
its formation and send the enemy retreating in his turn. For the present we must leave the sounds and inlets and follow other adventures. All the sounds of North Carolina and the rivers emptying into them as far up as the gun-boats could reach were virtually in the hands of the Federal Government. North Carolina was no longer a base of supplies for the Confederates The sounds and inlets of Georgia, South Carolina and Florida were nearly all closed up by the Navy, and Wilmington and Charleston were really the only two places by which the Confederacy could obtain supplies or munitions of war from abroad. All of this work had been done within a year of the commencement of the war, in spite of delays which enabled the enemy to erect earthworks and sink obstructions that required herculean labors to remove. Inadequate as were the vessels supplied to the Navy, the officers seldom failed to accomplish what they attempted, and it was a well-deserved compliment when an old soldier
Cobb's Point (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
protracted combat, and to bring the enemy to close quarters as soon as possible, for the reason that his ammunition was reduced to 20 rounds for each gun in the fleet (owing to the battle of Roanoke Island). He made signal for the commanders of vessels to come on board the flagship, and after conferring with them in regard to the proper measures to be adopted he gave them their final orders. It was naturally expected that the Confederate fleet would take position behind the battery at Cobb's Point, and there await the attack; but the result was not feared, as it had been shown in the battle of Roanoke Island that the Confederate vessels could not hold their own, even when supported by heavy forts. The plan of attack was that the gun-boats should approach in close order and proceed up the river without firing a shot until ordered to do so, dash through the enemy's lines, crushing and sinking him if possible, or engage in hand-to-hand conflict; after capturing or destroying the st
Cumberland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
who received the support of the Navy, but rather the fault of the military historians, who in almost all cases ignored the Navy altogether. Did the limits of this paper permit, and could the numerous cases of support to the Army be specially noted, it would readily be seen that in the Sounds of North Carolina, under Goldsborough, in the rivers, bayous and inlets along the Southern coast under Dupont, on the coast of Louisiana and Texas and the whole length of the Mississippi, Tennessee, Cumberland, White, Arkansas and Red Rivers, a distance of over 3,000 miles, the Navy more or less contributed towards success; and if defeat overtook our Armies at any time while the Navy was at hand, the enemy gained no important or lasting advantage. Our Army always had a line of defense (the naval gun-boats) on which they could fall back, regain its formation and send the enemy retreating in his turn. For the present we must leave the sounds and inlets and follow other adventures. All the sou
Goldsboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Chapter 11: Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. Expedition to Roanoke Island. Rear-Admiral Goldsborough in command of naval forces. Army forces under command of General Burnside. vessels and officers in command. a nondescript squadron. Commander Rowan given command. description of Roanoke Island. the defenses. attack on works and vessels. barracks at Fort Bartow on fire. Landing of troops at Ashley's harbor. capture of Fort Bartow. destruction of stice. The Federal forces had not yet gained entire possession of the interior waters of the Sound, but that came a few months later, and will all be narrated in its proper place. On the 9th of July, 1862, an expedition was fitted out from Goldsborough's fleet for the examination of certain rivers leading into the Sounds of North Carolina, in order to ascertain whether the enemy was fortifying the river banks or building men-of-war at the small towns in the interior. The expedition consis
Greenville, North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
running from Hatteras Inlet to the Dismal Swamp canal, and that in order to retain control of these highways it was necessary for the Unionists to capture this position at all hazards. It was a great strategic point which enabled the Confederates to cover Norfolk in the rear, Welden and the Northeast railroads, and keep open their communications with Lee's army at Richmond. If the Northern Government had established a formidable army in North Carolina in the neighborhood of Plymouth, Greenville and Newbern, connected by lines of communication and supported near these places by a fleet of gun-boats with powerful guns, the Wilmington Railroad, Raleigh and Welden would have been within striking distance of our army, and the Confederates would have been obliged to use more northern railroads to obtain their supplies, even if they did not have to evacuate Richmond. The final movement of our army under Sherman in his March to the sea, was directed towards some of these points in North
Redstone Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
at Ashley's harbor. capture of Fort Bartow. destruction of steamer Curlew and batteries at Redstone Point. hearts of oak in wooden ships. Confederates surrender to Generals Foster and Reno. lossot neglecting the enemy's vessels), a battery between Pork and Weir's Points, and another on Redstone Point (see plan), all of which returned the fire of the Federal fleet, but without much effect. ire, and one of them, the Curlew, in a disabled condition. took refuge under the battery at Redstone Point. As evening came on, the Rear Admiral commanding made signal to cease firing — not wishing ar the channel of obstructions, to enable the squadron to pass up and destroy the battery on Redstone Point, which had only one gun left to fire, and also the Curlew, which lay disabled under the enem battery at Pork Point, and in a few minutes afterwards the enemy himself fired the works at Redstone Point and the Confederate steamer Curlew: both blew up early in the evening. Thus ended the att
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ll back, regain its formation and send the enemy retreating in his turn. For the present we must leave the sounds and inlets and follow other adventures. All the sounds of North Carolina and the rivers emptying into them as far up as the gun-boats could reach were virtually in the hands of the Federal Government. North Carolina was no longer a base of supplies for the Confederates The sounds and inlets of Georgia, South Carolina and Florida were nearly all closed up by the Navy, and Wilmington and Charleston were really the only two places by which the Confederacy could obtain supplies or munitions of war from abroad. All of this work had been done within a year of the commencement of the war, in spite of delays which enabled the enemy to erect earthworks and sink obstructions that required herculean labors to remove. Inadequate as were the vessels supplied to the Navy, the officers seldom failed to accomplish what they attempted, and it was a well-deserved compliment when
Roanoke Sound (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ers, through which the Confederates were carrying on an active trade. Roanoke Island barred the way between these two sounds, and the Confederates had made it a formidable barrier by the erection of heavy fortifications The channel connecting Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds in which Roanoke Island lies is very shallow, and could therefore be easily obstructed by sunken vessels or piles. The sheet of water on the west side of the island is called Croatan Sound, and that on the east side Roanoke Sound. All of these waters are navigable to a certain extent, but large vessels can only pass through the western channel. (See the plan, which will more fully explain the situation than any description.) It is quite clear that Roanoke Island in the hands of the Confederates was the key to that great chain of sounds and passages Vice-Admiral S. C. Rowan. running from Hatteras Inlet to the Dismal Swamp canal, and that in order to retain control of these highways it was necessary for the
Croatan Sound (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
tifications The channel connecting Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds in which Roanoke Island lies is very shallow, and could therefore be easily obstructed by sunken vessels or piles. The sheet of water on the west side of the island is called Croatan Sound, and that on the east side Roanoke Sound. All of these waters are navigable to a certain extent, but large vessels can only pass through the western channel. (See the plan, which will more fully explain the situation than any description.) its way through the intricate channels of the marshes, owing to fogs and foul weather. These channels were so narrow that only two vessels could proceed abreast, and in this order they continued until reaching the wider and deeper waters of Croatan Sound. The naval division, composed and commanded as stated above, was accompanied, as predetermined, by the Picket, Capt. T. P. Ives; Huzzar, Capt. Frederick Crocker; Pioneer, Capt. Charles E. Baker; Vidette, Capt. John L. Foster; Ranger, Capt.
Roanoke (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
euse and Pamlico Rivers must fall into our hands, they determined to fortify Roanoke Island and prevent our getting into Albemarle Sound; so that they could hold communication with Norfolk through the Currituck Inlet and save Plymouth and the Roanoke River. They were building some heavy iron-clads up that river, and all the material, machinery and guns had to be transported from Norfolk and Richmond. The defences of Roanoke Island consisted of six separate works. Five of these guarded the lusser; the Ceres. Lieut. John McDiarmid; and the Shawsheen, Acting-Master T. T. Woodward, with a detachment of about forty soldiers in addition to their regular crews. The first of the places to be examined was the town of Hamilton on the Roanoke River. The banks of this river were high in places and afforded many commanding positions from which an enemy upon the water could be attacked with little danger to the attacking party. The Confederates did not fail to make the most of their op
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