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August, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 11
es of Army. advantages of capture of Roanoke Island. escape of Confederate fleet. casualties among naval forces Commander Rowan pursues Confederate fleet. destruction of Confederate fleet and forts on Pasquotank River. attempt to burn Elizabeth City. expeditions up rivers leading into sounds. bravery of Lieut. Flusser. Owing to the fact that the commanding officer of the Hatteras expedition did not push the advantages he had gained by the capture of Forts Hatteras and Clark, in August, 1861, the victory was almost a barren one, with the exception of its moral effect and the recapture of many of the guns which had fallen into the hands of the Confederates. The principal entrances into the sounds of North Carolina were secured, but the Confederates had still the means not only of annoying the coast-wise commerce passing daily before these inlets, but also of supplying their armies through the intricate and numerous channels belonging to the several sounds, and known only to
January, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
most a barren one, with the exception of its moral effect and the recapture of many of the guns which had fallen into the hands of the Confederates. The principal entrances into the sounds of North Carolina were secured, but the Confederates had still the means not only of annoying the coast-wise commerce passing daily before these inlets, but also of supplying their armies through the intricate and numerous channels belonging to the several sounds, and known only to themselves. In January, 1862, it was determined by the Navy Department to fit out an expedition for the purpose of capturing Roanoke Island, and getting possession of Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds. This had become a necessity, as the Confederates had facilities for fitting out light armed and swift vessels, which could get in and out at their pleasure and attack our commerce whenever it suited their convenience. It was also known that the Confederates were fitting out some powerful ironclads in the western waters
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