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Pasquotank (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
r to Generals Foster and Reno. losses of Army. advantages of capture of Roanoke Island. escape of Confederate fleet. casualties among naval forces Commander Rowan pursues Confederate fleet. destruction of Confederate fleet and forts on Pasquotank River. attempt to burn Elizabeth City. expeditions up rivers leading into sounds. bravery of Lieut. Flusser. Owing to the fact that the commanding officer of the Hatteras expedition did not push the advantages he had gained by the capture oformidable squadron, but it was equal to the occasion. Late in the afternoon of the 9th this fleet of vessels entered Albemarle Sound in search of the enemy, and soon after sighted the smoke of two steamers, which were seen to be heading for Pasquotank River. Chase was given and an attempt made to cut them off, but without success, and the Confederates escaped over the bar and then up the river. The Union fleet was then anchored for the night, ten miles distant from Fort Cobb. Commander Row
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
nists to capture this position at all hazards. It was a great strategic point which enabled the Confederates to cover Norfolk in the rear, Welden and the Northeast railroads, and keep open their communications with Lee's army at Richmond. If tmined to fortify Roanoke Island and prevent our getting into Albemarle Sound; so that they could hold communication with Norfolk through the Currituck Inlet and save Plymouth and the Roanoke River. They were building some heavy iron-clads up that river, and all the material, machinery and guns had to be transported from Norfolk and Richmond. The defences of Roanoke Island consisted of six separate works. Five of these guarded the water approaches and the sixth was a masked battery intender the purpose of destroying the enemy's property and blocking up the canals, so that no communication could be held with Norfolk. But we cannot refer to these operations at this time, as events of far greater importance were now taking place at Ham
Ashby's Harbor (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
s, having got their range, were throwing in a very destructive fire. At 3 P. M. the troops shifted to light-draft steamers and boats and started to land at Ashby's Harbor. This place was guarded by a large body of the enemy with a field battery, but Commander Rowan in the Delaware, taking up a flanking position to the southwarwo forks. On the following morning they assisted in the active operations of the Army. By midnight some ten thousand of our troops had been landed safely at Ashby's Harbor. On February 8th it was arranged by General Burnside that his forces should move at an early hour in the morning, and begin their attack upon the enemy; ant the Curlew, could be discovered. At 9 A. M. a continuous firing in the interior of the island showed that the Army was hotly engaged with the enemy between Ashby's Harbor and Pork Point. The Admiral being thus informed of the position of our troops, and seeing that they were now beyond his line of fire, at once moved up and en
Clark (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
d Reno. losses of Army. advantages of capture of Roanoke Island. escape of Confederate fleet. casualties among naval forces Commander Rowan pursues Confederate fleet. destruction of Confederate fleet and forts on Pasquotank River. attempt to burn Elizabeth City. expeditions up rivers leading into sounds. bravery of Lieut. Flusser. Owing to the fact that the commanding officer of the Hatteras expedition did not push the advantages he had gained by the capture of Forts Hatteras and Clark, in August, 1861, the victory was almost a barren one, with the exception of its moral effect and the recapture of many of the guns which had fallen into the hands of the Confederates. The principal entrances into the sounds of North Carolina were secured, but the Confederates had still the means not only of annoying the coast-wise commerce passing daily before these inlets, but also of supplying their armies through the intricate and numerous channels belonging to the several sounds, and
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
upport of the Navy, but rather the fault of the military historians, who in almost all cases ignored the Navy altogether. Did the limits of this paper permit, and could the numerous cases of support to the Army be specially noted, it would readily be seen that in the Sounds of North Carolina, under Goldsborough, in the rivers, bayous and inlets along the Southern coast under Dupont, on the coast of Louisiana and Texas and the whole length of the Mississippi, Tennessee, Cumberland, White, Arkansas and Red Rivers, a distance of over 3,000 miles, the Navy more or less contributed towards success; and if defeat overtook our Armies at any time while the Navy was at hand, the enemy gained no important or lasting advantage. Our Army always had a line of defense (the naval gun-boats) on which they could fall back, regain its formation and send the enemy retreating in his turn. For the present we must leave the sounds and inlets and follow other adventures. All the sounds of North Carol
Fort Cobb (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
This was not a very formidable squadron, but it was equal to the occasion. Late in the afternoon of the 9th this fleet of vessels entered Albemarle Sound in search of the enemy, and soon after sighted the smoke of two steamers, which were seen to be heading for Pasquotank River. Chase was given and an attempt made to cut them off, but without success, and the Confederates escaped over the bar and then up the river. The Union fleet was then anchored for the night, ten miles distant from Fort Cobb. Commander Rowan knew very little about the condition of affairs up the river, whether there were any batteries, torpedoes or obstructions, but he well knew that if there were any forts the Confederate gun-boats would naturally seek their protection and rely on their aid in any encounter that might follow with the Federal forces. The Attack on Roanoke Island by Commodore Goldsborough's gun-boats, and landing of troops under command of Generals Foster, Reno and Parks. February 8, 186
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
mentioned. This was not the fault of the gallant soldiers who received the support of the Navy, but rather the fault of the military historians, who in almost all cases ignored the Navy altogether. Did the limits of this paper permit, and could the numerous cases of support to the Army be specially noted, it would readily be seen that in the Sounds of North Carolina, under Goldsborough, in the rivers, bayous and inlets along the Southern coast under Dupont, on the coast of Louisiana and Texas and the whole length of the Mississippi, Tennessee, Cumberland, White, Arkansas and Red Rivers, a distance of over 3,000 miles, the Navy more or less contributed towards success; and if defeat overtook our Armies at any time while the Navy was at hand, the enemy gained no important or lasting advantage. Our Army always had a line of defense (the naval gun-boats) on which they could fall back, regain its formation and send the enemy retreating in his turn. For the present we must leave th
ogs and foul weather. These channels were so narrow that only two vessels could proceed abreast, and in this order they continued until reaching the wider and deeper waters of Croatan Sound. The naval division, composed and commanded as stated above, was accompanied, as predetermined, by the Picket, Capt. T. P. Ives; Huzzar, Capt. Frederick Crocker; Pioneer, Capt. Charles E. Baker; Vidette, Capt. John L. Foster; Ranger, Capt. Samuel Emerson; Lancer, Capt. M. B. Morley, and Chasseur, Capt. John West, of the army division. Keeping in close order it approached the enemy near enough to begin the attack, and to devote most of its firing against the fort on Pork Point (not neglecting the enemy's vessels), a battery between Pork and Weir's Points, and another on Redstone Point (see plan), all of which returned the fire of the Federal fleet, but without much effect. The Federal vessels having obtained position the action became general between them and the enemy, the army transports a
Chapter 11: Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. Expedition to Roanoke Island. Rear-Admiral Goldsborough in command of naval forces. Army forces under command of General Burnside. vessels and officers in command. a nondescript squadron. Commander Rowan given command. description of Roanoke Island. the defenses. attack on works and vessels. barracks at Fort Bartow on fire. Landing of troops at Ashley's harbor. capture of Fort Bartow. destruction of steamer Curlew and batteries at Redstone Point. hearts of oak in wooden ships. Confederates surrender to Generals Foster and Reno. losses of Army. advantages of capture of Roanoke Island. escape of Confederate fleet. casualties among naval forces Commander Rowan pursues Confederate fleet. destruction of Confederate fleet and forts on Pasquotank River. attempt to burn Elizabeth City. expeditions up rivers leading into sounds. bravery of Lieut. Flusser. Owing to the fact that the comm
p the Confederate Navy, which had disappeared entirely; and on the 9th of February he directed Com. Rowan to pursue them with the following vessels: Louisiana, Lieut.-Com. Murray; Hetzel, Lieut.-Com. Davenport; Underwriter, Lieut.-Com. Jeffers; Delaware, Lieut.-Com. Quackenbush; Commodore Perry, Lieut.-Com. Flusser; Valley City, Lieut.-Com. Chaplin; Morse, Acting-Master French; Lockwood, Acting-Master Graves; Ceres, Acting-Master McDiarmid; Shawsheen, Acting-Master Woodward; Brincker Acting-Master Geddings; Putnam, Acting-Master Hotchkiss. This was not a very formidable squadron, but it was equal to the occasion. Late in the afternoon of the 9th this fleet of vessels entered Albemarle Sound in search of the enemy, and soon after sighted the smoke of two steamers, which were seen to be heading for Pasquotank River. Chase was given and an attempt made to cut them off, but without success, and the Confederates escaped over the bar and then up the river. The Union fleet was then anch
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