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Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
on Grant seized this latter place and garrisoned it. Thus the two armies were near each other. Grant had nothing but ordinary transports to operate with, and these were liable to be cut to pieces from the banks of the river by the Confederate light artillery. On the 14th of September Commander Henry Walke, in command of the Taylor, under orders from Flag-officer Foote, proceeded down the river towards Columbus to make reconnoissance, accompanied by officers of General Grant's staff. At Norfolk, six miles below Cairo, the Taylor took on board a hundred men of the Ninth Illinois Regiment, and then approached Columbus to ascertain the strength of the batteries. These batteries were built upon what was called the Iron Banks, at the first Chickasaw Bluff, which rose from two to three hundred feet above the river, overlooking its course for a distance of twenty miles north and south. The Confederate batteries were placed on the spurs of the bluff, one of them, fifty feet above the wa
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
aged to build gun-boats. depot established at Cairo. Navy yard at Mound City. Flag-officer Footethere blocked the way for Army transports from Cairo to the sea. Then the Army began to talk of imp's first acts was to establish a depot at Cairo, Illinois, where his vessels could berepaired and cwho remember the Navy Yard at Mound City, near Cairo, and the large fleet which grew from the small Pennock was placed in command of the depot at Cairo, the navy yard being literally afloatin wharf equently established at Mound City, just above Cairo, the Union exulted in the possession of a real 1861, he established his Headquarters at Cairo, Illinois. His district included Southern Illinoisity, seizing Columbus, some twenty miles below Cairo, and threatening Paducah; whereupon Grant seizal Grant's staff. At Norfolk, six miles below Cairo, the Taylor took on board a hundred men of thee having been completed the vessel returned to Cairo. The Taylor and Lexington were constantly e
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
th raw troops; but the list of killed and wounded was in favor of the Federals, although they had less than one-half the enemy's force. The gallant conduct of Commanders Walke and Stembel does not appear to have secured even a passing notice from the Secretary of the Navy, which was certainly a great injustice to two officers who had demonstrated so plainly the efficiency of gun-boats on the Western rivers. It was a part of the Confederate plan early in the civil war to seize and hold Missouri and Kansas, thus threatening the free States in the Northwest, to hold Kentucky and Tennessee, cross the Ohio, and make the Northern States the theatre of war, thus punishing the Northern people for their obstinacy in declining to yield to the demands of the secessionists. This plan, which had been discussed long before the Southern States seceded, would doubtless have been carried out had it not been for the multitude of men in the North who sprang to arms and frustrated the Confederate p
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ss, was soon in full blast preparing vessels to attack anything we might put upon the rivers. But our light gun-boats showed themselves not only fit for picket duty and for clearing the banks of bushwhackers, but even to take a hand in shelling heavy batteries. At this period of the war General Grant had been transferred to the command of the District of Southeast Missouri, and on the 4th of September, 1861, he established his Headquarters at Cairo, Illinois. His district included Southern Illinois and so much of Western Kentucky and Tennessee as might fall into possession of the national forces. It comprised the junction of the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers, and was at the time the most important point of operations in the West. Kentucky, in the early part of the war, endeavored to preserve a neutral position between the contending sections. but the Confederate General Polk soon violated this neutrality, seizing Columbus, some twenty miles below Cairo,
Carondelet (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
g these vessels, as they performed such remarkable service all through the war, and notwithstanding their defects and the vicissitudes they experienced, no vessels in the Navy engaged in so many successful battles or made such a record for their commanding officers. Within two weeks after the contract with Eads was signed, four thousand men were busily engaged in constructing the vessels. The work was pushed night and day, and on the 12th of October, 1861, the St. Louis was launched at Carondelet, Missouri, forty-five days after her keel was laid. When this vessel was transferred with the others to the Navy Department, her name was changed to Baron deKalb. as there was already a St. Louis in the Navy. In the course of the succeeding twenty days the Carondelet, Cincinnati, Louisville. Mound City, Cairo and Pittsburg followed in rapid succession. An eighth vessel, the Benton, superior in every respect to the above, was undertaken. She was originally a wrecking boat, purchased by
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
. Commander Walke attacks the batteries near Columbus. battle of Belmont. Grant gains two victoris in Tennessee, and Polk's heavy batteries at Columbus barred the way against vessels from above. Tl Polk soon violated this neutrality, seizing Columbus, some twenty miles below Cairo, and threatenificer Foote, proceeded down the river towards Columbus to make reconnoissance, accompanied by office Ninth Illinois Regiment, and then approached Columbus to ascertain the strength of the batteries. the two gun-boats, to attack the batteries at Columbus as a diversion, which was done. As the gun-bmen, were discovered coming up the river from Columbus, and Grant Battle of Belmont. endeavored toire drew the attention of the artillerists at Columbus, who opened on the Federal troops. The mared the enemy's batteries on the heights above Columbus, and protected our transports throughout. Foes had to land their troops that crossed from Columbus three miles below, giving the men a long marc[2 more...]
Mound City (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ter 13: building a navy on the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. James B. Eads engaged to build gun-boats. depot established at Cairo. Navy yard at Mound City. Flag-officer Foote in command of Mississippi Squadron. Captain Pennock and assistants. the Taylor, Lexington and Conestoga. Grant seizes Paducah. Commandet acts was to establish a depot at Cairo, Illinois, where his vessels could berepaired and could replenish their stores; and those who remember the Navy Yard at Mound City, near Cairo, and the large fleet which grew from the small squadron first put afloat, will wonder why we should require so many navy yards atthe present time wh wharf boats, old steamers, tugs, flat-boats, or even rafts, as the government owned no land at that point; but when the station was subsequently established at Mound City, just above Cairo, the Union exulted in the possession of a real navy-yard of some ten acres, which, although sometimes under water from freshets, soon grew to
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
free States in the Northwest, to hold Kentucky and Tennessee, cross the Ohio, and make the Northern States the theatre of war, thus punishing the Northern people for their obstinacy in declining to yield to the demands of the secessionists. This plan, which had been discussed long before the Southern States seceded, would doubtless have been carried out had it not been for the multitude of men in the North who sprang to arms and frustrated the Confederate plans. Lee had to retreat from Pennsylvania, where it was determined that the Confederates should endure all the hardships of war to teach them the folly of rebellion. To circumvent the grand schemes of the enemy in the West, it was necessary that we should have a naval force on all the rivers, and Attorney General Bates seems to have been the first person in the government to point out the necessity of such a force to get possession of all the tributaries of the Mississippi, and finally of the great river itself to the sea. Mr.
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
to get the squadron ready for service, as the enemy were fortifying the banks of the rivers in Tennessee, and Polk's heavy batteries at Columbus barred the way against vessels from above. The civiliot long in following the Federal example; and the Navy Yard at Memphis, turned over to the State of Tennessee with all its appliances, by act of Congress, was soon in full blast preparing vessels to a Cairo, Illinois. His district included Southern Illinois and so much of Western Kentucky and Tennessee as might fall into possession of the national forces. It comprised the junction of the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers, and was at the time the most important point of operations in the West. Kentucky, in the early part of the war, endeavored to preserve a neutral positd Missouri and Kansas, thus threatening the free States in the Northwest, to hold Kentucky and Tennessee, cross the Ohio, and make the Northern States the theatre of war, thus punishing the Northern
Belmont Landing (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ht or ten eight-inch shells into them, killing and wounding several of the enemy, and the reconnoissance having been completed the vessel returned to Cairo. The Taylor and Lexington were constantly employed on such service, and their value soon became apparent to the army officers, who had at first thought they would be of little use. Soon after the above mentioned reconnoissance. General Grant wrote to Commander Walke, requesting the services of the gun-boats to accompany him to Belmont landing, and on the 16th of November, 1861, the General started down the river with 3.100 men in transports, convoyed by the Taylor, Com. Walke, and the Lexington, Corn. R. N. Stembel. Grant landed his troops at Hunter's Point, on the Missouri side, out of range of the Columbus batteries, and marched direct on Belmont, three miles distant, where the Confederates had posted their camp in an open space protected by fallen timber. By nine o'clock Grant's entire command was hotly engaged, except
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