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August 7th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 21
ams, pilot, who never left their post of danger, and, by their energy and coolness, contributed to the saving of the boat. Mr. Miller, chief engineer, Mr. Parker, third master, and Mr. Jacobi, of the Essex, all did their duty nobly. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. K. Riley, Commanding Gun-boat Anglo-American. Commodore W. D. Porter, Commanding Naval Forces below Vicksburg. Destruction of the ram Arkansas. Flag-Ship Hartford, Baton Rouge, Aug. 7, 1862. Sir — It is one of the happiest moments of my life that I am enabled to inform the department of the destruction of the ram Arkansas; not because I held the iron-clad in such terror, but because the community did. On the 4th instant I sent the Tennessee up to Baton Rouge with provisions for Commander Porter and the gun-boats stationed at that place. On the night of the 5th, she returned with the information that the enemy had made a combined attack upon Baton Rouge by the ram and
August 29th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 21
avy. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. P. S.--In the various encounters I have had since leaving St. Louis on the last cruise (July 6), the Essex has been struck by heavy shot perceptibly one hundred and twenty-eight times — glancing shot have left no record; three have broken the iron, and but one through, and that at a distance of a few feet from the battery delivering it. W. D. P. United States Gun-Boat Anglo-American, Off Bayou Sara, Louisiana, Aug. 29, 1862. Sir — In pursuance of your order, I proceeded down stream on the 24th instant, for New Orleans, arriving there on the morning of the 25th. We loaded up with coal, and left that city at 3.15 P. M., on Thursday, the 28th instant. Nothing of importance occurred until I reached Port Hudson. I noticed earthworks had been thrown up on the bluffs as well as the water line, but no guns being in sight, I kept on for about a mile, when another line of earthworks was discovered, as well as i
September 9th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 21
nclose herewith reports of Assistant Surgeon Matthewson, of the casualties of yesterday; also report of ammunition expended, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Ed. T. Nichols, Lieutenant-Commander. Flag-officer D. G. Farragut, Commanding Western Division Gulf Blockading Squadron. Commodore W. D. Porter's report of reconnoissance, with account of engagement of the Anglo-American, on the 28th of August, at Port Hudson, La. United States Gun-Boat Essex, off New Orleans, Sept. 9, 1862. Sir — I have the honor to report that, on the 23d ultimo, having remained off the city of Baton Rouge two days after its evacuation by our troops, I proceeded up the river to reconnoitre reported batteries in progress at Port Hudson, Louisiana, and also coal my vessel at Bayou Sara, the only place I could obtain any, save New Orleans. Arriving there, I found the town entirely deserted, and the coal burning. Sending a boat's crew on shore, they were fired at by guerillas from the ho
October, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 21
rry on operations against the enemy, but he found that nothing could be done in the Yazoo at low water, and besides, the enemy had constructed formidable barricades, well defended by heavy batteries, at Haines' Bluff, some miles above the mouth of the river; and with these he had not sufficient force to contend. His line of operations was entirely too extended for the force he had in hand, and all his vessels needed repairs. Flag-officer Davis, therefore, returned to Cairo, where, in October, 1862, he was relieved from the command of the Mississippi Squadron by Acting-Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. The following reports will give a pretty full account of what was done in the first naval attack on Vicksburg. Flag-officer Farragut reports the necessity of 12,000 to 15,000 army forces to cooperate in the taking of Vicksburg. Flag-Ship Hartford, above Vicksburg, June 28, 1862. Sir — I passed up the river this morning, but to no purpose; the enemy leave their guns for the
he levee at any one who should dare come on shore from the ships. At this time the whole city was in an uproar, such as was perhaps never before seen in this country. All the vagabonds of the town, thieves, ragpickers, abandoned women, the inhabitants of the slums, all were abroad. their faces distorted by passion, the riffraff, hobnobbing with the well-to-do, and all animated by a common hatred of the detested Yankees. Lieutenant (now Captain) George H. Perkins. (from a portrait taken 1884.) It looked as if law and order could never be re-established. The steamers that had been left unburned were lying at the levee, with crowds of maniacs rushing over their decks, the men smashing in the rice tierces, the women scraping up all that could be gathered. Such portions as could not be carried off were thrown into the river--the damned Yankees shan't have it! they cried. There was no way of testifying their rage to which the mob did not resort. All at once a boat was seen
James Alden (search for this): chapter 21
abandoned. Flag-officer Davis relieved. reports of Flag-officer Farragut, Captain Craven, commanders Alden, Wainwright, Palmer, De camp, Porter, and fleet Surgeon Foltz, Lieut.-commanders Baldwin, Ping vessels-Iroquois, Commander J. S. Palmer; Oneida, Commander S. P. Lee; and Richmond, Commander James Alden. The other vessels--Wissahickon, Commander John DeCamp; Sciota, Lieutenant-Commander Ede ships and gunboats to weigh, they will form in a double line of sailing, the Richmond, Commander James Alden commanding, leading; the ships Hartford, Commander R. Wainwright commanding, next; Brookion to his profession and her cause. With great respect, I am, sir, your obedient servant, James Alden, Commander. Flag-officer D. G. Farragut, Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. bscurity of the night we could not make her out. Respectfully, sir, your obedient servant, James Alden, Commander. Flag-officer D. G. Farragut, Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron.
Charles Allen (search for this): chapter 21
-Stephen H. Randall, seaman. Pinola.--William H. Thomas, quarter-gunner; Thomas Graham, landsman. Sciota,--Augustine Ellsworth, ordinary seaman. Mortar flotilla.--6 scalded, 1 killed, 1 drowned. Wounded-30. Flag-ship Hartford.--Charles Allen, seaman, slightly; Alexander Capron, landsman, slightly; Lawrence Fay, boy, slightly; Patrick Roach, coalheaver, head; Philip Roberts, seaman, severely; Sylvester Becket, landsman, slightly; Alfred Stone, landsman, slightly; John H. Knowles, above Vicksburg, June 28, 1862. Sir — I have the honor to report the following list of killed and wounded on board this ship during the engagement with the batteries at Vicksburg, viz : Killed.--Edward E. Jennings, seaman. Wounded.--Charles Allen, seaman, head; Alex'r Capron, landsman, head; Lawrence Fay, boy; Patrick Roach, coal-heaver; Sylvester Becket, Alfred Stone and John Hardigan, landsmen; Jno. H. Knowles, quartermaster and Nathan J. Salter, ordinary seaman; all slightly. Phil
George Allstrum (search for this): chapter 21
. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Official list of killed and wounded in the affair of June 28, at Vicksburg. Flag-Ship Hartford, above Vicksburg, Mississippi, June 28, 1862. Sir — I have the honor to report the following list of killed and wounded in that portion of the fleet which passed above Vicksburg in the engagement of this morning, viz: Killed--15. Flag-ship Hartford.--Edward E. Jennings, seaman, from Massachusetts. Richmond.--George Allstrum, ordinary seaman; Thomas Flarity, seaman. Oneida.--Stephen H. Randall, seaman. Pinola.--William H. Thomas, quarter-gunner; Thomas Graham, landsman. Sciota,--Augustine Ellsworth, ordinary seaman. Mortar flotilla.--6 scalded, 1 killed, 1 drowned. Wounded-30. Flag-ship Hartford.--Charles Allen, seaman, slightly; Alexander Capron, landsman, slightly; Lawrence Fay, boy, slightly; Patrick Roach, coalheaver, head; Philip Roberts, seaman, severely; Sylvester Becket, landsman,
New Orleans. defences of New Orleans. two brave men (Capt. Bailey and Lieut. Perkins) face a mob. the Army under Generalragut's first acts on reaching New Orleans was to send Captain Bailey on shore, accompanied by Lieutenant George H. Perkins,d men at their backs. I want to see the mayor, said Captain Bailey, show me where he lives ; and now the crowd woke again no one in the squadron knew what might be their fate, but Bailey and Perkins walked coolly on in defiance of the rabble untf the Hartford were loaded with grape and canister, and as Bailey and Perkins were shut in by the crowd, the men stood to thundue influence in New Orleans. We have come. said Captain Bailey to the mayor, to demand the surrender of New Orleans, earance again howled, if possible, louder than before, but Bailey and Perkins waved them aside, and strode back to the leveee events of the civil war. Soon after the return of Captain Bailey and Lieutenant Perkins, Captain Charles H. Bell landed
C. H. Baldwin (search for this): chapter 21
ansas slips by the fleet, to Vicksburg. the attack on Vicksburg abandoned. Flag-officer Davis relieved. reports of Flag-officer Farragut, Captain Craven, commanders Alden, Wainwright, Palmer, De camp, Porter, and fleet Surgeon Foltz, Lieut.-commanders Baldwin, Preble, Russell, Lee, Donaldson, Nichols, Crosby, Woodworth and Lowry. Commodore W. D. Porter's report of engagement at Port Hudson. report of Commander Riley. When Farragut passed the Chalmette batteries, and the vessel approacheuse, killing the helmsman, and the Clifton a shot through her boiler, killing (by scalding) the men in her magazine, six in number, and one man was drowned by jumping overboard. I herewith forward the report of Acting Lieutenant-Commander C. H. Baldwin, of the Clifton. The department will perceive from this (my) report, that the forts can be passed, and we have done it, and can do it again as often as may be required of us. It will not, however, be an easy matter for us to do more than sile
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