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Edward York (search for this): chapter 21
the 15th instant, viz: Flag-ship Hartford. Killed.--George H. Loundsberry, master's mate; Charles Jackson, officers' cook, and John Cameron, seaman, by cannon shot. Wounded.--Captain John L. Broome, marine corps, and Thomas Hoffman, paymaster's steward, severe contusions; John D. Barnes, fireman, and Michael Martin, landsman, contusions; George Royer, marine, and Henry Downs, boy, slightly. Wissahickon. Killed.--John Garrett, ordinary seaman, by a cannon shot. Wounded.--Edward York, fireman, and Daniel Hayes, ordinary seaman, and Joseph Ranahan, landsman, severely; James Revell, ordinary seaman, slightly. Winona. Killed.--John H. Harway, landsman, by a shell. Wounded.--John Jones, captain afterguard, severely; William Malley, landsman, slightly. Sciota. Wounded.--James H. Mathist, landsman, and Peter Lasher, ordinary seaman, severely. Richmond. Wounded.--William Somes and William Nelson, seamen, slightly. Total--5 killed; 16 wounded. I am,
Thomas Yard (search for this): chapter 21
ther 7-inch rifle projectile in our starboard wheel, cutting away one-half of the bridge piece supporting the other end of the shaft immediately under the pillar block. We were struck slightly by two grape, or other shot, doing no damage. We fired from our guns during the engagement 117 shot, shells, grape and shrapnel. I take pleasure in stating that the gallant conduct of my men and officers during the action met with my highest commendations. Enclosed I send you the report of Surgeon Thomas Yard, containing list of wounded. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Selim E. Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commander, United States Navy. Commander D. D. Porter, Commanding Mortar Flotilla. Engagement with the ram Arkansas, July 15, 1862. United States Flag-Ship Hartford, below Vicksburg, July 17, 1862. Sir — It is with deep mortification that I announce to the department that, notwithstanding my prediction to the contrary, the iron-clad ram Arkansa
J. Harry Wyatt (search for this): chapter 21
eavy shot fourteen times. As nearly as I can judge, the enemy had in position from thirty-five to forty guns of 10-inch, 9-inch, and 8-inch calibre, in three batteries commanding the river to the extent of five miles. A 68-pound, 32-pound, and also a 10-inch shot, lodged in the Essex, but without material damage. We were under fire an hour and three-quarters, during which time the guns were worked well and incessantly, and I have reason to believe the enemy was considerably damaged. Mr. J. Harry Wyatt, acting fourth master, and my secretary, had command of the forward battery, and his conduct met my entire approbation. A land force will be necessary to complete the destruction of this fort, which, if allowed to again be restored, would seriously interrupt the free navigation of the Lower Mississippi. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. D. Porter, Commodore, United States Navy. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. P. S.--In the various en
Selim E. Woodworth (search for this): chapter 21
ndsomely repulsed by the Owasco and Jackson, Lieutenants Commanding Guest and Woodworth. The mortar schooners George Mangham and Arletta, Acting-Masters John Collinair target for what guns the enemy were able to fire. The Jackson, Lieutenant-Commander Woodworth, was struck badly with rifle shells, one of which exploded in her w eight or ten men overboard, one of whom was drowned. The Jackson, Lieutenant-Commander Woodworth, now became the helping ship, and picked up out of the water the Clron. Reports of Lieutenant-Commander Crosby, of the Pinola, and Lieutenant-Commander Woodworth, of the J. P. Jackson, of the attack on Vicksburg, June 28, 1862. of the attack on Vicksburg, June 28, 1862; also the report of Lieutenant-Commander Selim E. Woodworth, commanding the gun-boat J. P. Jackson, of the same affair. ed. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Selim E. Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commander, United States Navy. Commander D. D. Porter, Comma
S. E. Woodworth (search for this): chapter 21
Farragut and Davis join hands. the ram Arkansas makes her appearance. a vigorous pursuit. engagement between the Arkansas and Carondelet. the Carondelet drifts ashore. the Arkansas slips by the fleet, to Vicksburg. the attack on Vicksburg abandoned. Flag-officer Davis relieved. reports of Flag-officer Farragut, Captain Craven, commanders Alden, Wainwright, Palmer, De camp, Porter, and fleet Surgeon Foltz, Lieut.-commanders Baldwin, Preble, Russell, Lee, Donaldson, Nichols, Crosby, Woodworth and Lowry. Commodore W. D. Porter's report of engagement at Port Hudson. report of Commander Riley. When Farragut passed the Chalmette batteries, and the vessel approached New Orleans, the city levee presented a scene of desolation. Ships, cotton, steamers and coal, were in a blaze and it looked as if the whole city was on fire. It required all the ingenuity of the commanding officers to avoid coming in contact with the floating conflagration, and when the ships dropped anchor bef
Henry E. Williams (search for this): chapter 21
of Farragut's squadron, was never carried out. Three thousand troops only (under command of General Williams) were landed opposite Vicksburg, but, as they attempted nothing important, their presence we enemy has a large force behind the hills to prevent our landing and holding the place. General Williams has with him about three thousand men, and, on the occasion of our attack and passing, placed one of the guns, and killed a man and a horse. It gives me great pleasure to say that General Williams, Colonel Ellet, and the army officers of this division generally, have uniformly shown a grt the Navy has not a braver man or better officer. * * * * * * * I hear by a deserter to General Williams that General Breckinridge is in command at Vicksburg, and they are seizing every one for theet of water. When this was proposed to Flag-officer Davis he consented immediately, and General Williams offered to send up a few sharpshooters. The next morning they went off at daylight, and by
B. S. Williams (search for this): chapter 21
with pleasure, I here state the gallant conduct of Mr. H. Glasford, executive officer, and Mr. B. S. Williams, pilot, who never left their post of danger, and, by their energy and coolness, contributehat yesterday morning at 2 o'clock the enemy's forces, under General Breckinridge, attacked General Williams, drove in his pickets, etc. General Williams, having had ample warning, we all prepared forGeneral Williams, having had ample warning, we all prepared for him. The fight was continued with great energy on both sides until 10 A. M., by which time the enemy had been driven back two or three miles, but, unfortunately, the gallant General Williams, while cGeneral Williams, while cheering on his men, received a Minie ball through his heart. General Williams had informed Lieutenant-Commander Ransom the evening before of his plans, and requested him not to fire a gun until he General Williams had informed Lieutenant-Commander Ransom the evening before of his plans, and requested him not to fire a gun until he notified him; and when he did so, our gun-boats — the Kineo and Katahdin--opened with fine effect, throwing their shells directly in the midst of the enemy, producing great dismay and confusion among
Hoel William (search for this): chapter 21
, and mortally wounded Thomas Graham, landsman, who died in a few minutes after; it also slightly wounded William H. Shucks, landsman. Daniel Colleran, landsman, was wounded by a musket ball, volleys of which were fired at us from hills and bushes. We received some four or five large grape shot in the hull just below the water-ways. I am happy to say that neither the vessel nor guns were disabled. The howitzer continued firing after the accident, under the direction of Acting-Master's Mate William H. Thompson, who, by his brave example, restored confidence to his crew, and did great service in the action. I have again the pleasant duty of bearing testimony to the gallant conduct of the officers and crew of this vessel, and the spirit and zeal exhibited in the performance of their duties on this occasion. John R. Tennant, quartermaster, gave the soundings with as much coolness as though he had been making an ordinary survey. Mr. John McHugh, our pilot, behaved in a remarkably c
Gideon Welles (search for this): chapter 21
Farragut, Commanding Western Gulf Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. obd't serv't. D. G. Farragut, Flag-officer. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of Navy, Washington. United Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. United States Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. W. D. Porter, Commodore, United States Navy. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.
M. W. Weld (search for this): chapter 21
l these, except John Connor, second-class fireman, who was drowned. This shot, which proved to be a fifty-pound rifled shot, prevented any further movement of our wheels for the time. We, however, continued our fire from the forward and after thirty-twos, and after nine-inch guns, until you noticed our mishap, and came alongside to tow us out of action. At this period the signal to retire was given. I have great satisfaction in stating that officers and crew generally behaved well. Mr. Weld, actingmaster's mate, in charge of the nine-inch and rifled Parrott gun forward, is entitled to credit for the admirable manner in which those guns were served, and his coolness and self-possession at the time of the accident. On examination of the injured boiler by the chief engineer of this ship, it is his opinion that the repairs to it will require at least ten days to complete and will need the aid of a shop and experienced workmen. In the meantime, the ship is ready for such servic
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