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Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
y the Army, the fleet and transports retraced their steps towards Vicksburg, and landed at Milliken's Bend or Young's Point about seven miles above Vicksburg. The fight at Fort Hindman was one of the prettiest little affairs of the war, not so little either, for a very importantt improper to divert the army from the original design to capture Vicksburg. He supposed the idea originated with General McClernand; but whcircumstances connected with the movement, and that the Army left Vicksburg because no longer able to operate owing to the floods, and that tmovement and could in no way contribute to the final overthrow of Vicksburg. Certain it is, the success at Arkansas Post had a most exhilao River. After the troops were settled in their tents opposite Vicksburg, it became apparent that there could be no harmonious cooperationdron, January 1, 1863. (excepting some of the vessels engaged at Vicksburg.) Acting Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commander-in-Chief.
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
Arrival of the expedition. the Army in the rear of Arkansas post. plan of the fort. the gun-boats in position. theumes command of all the forces. The expedition against Arkansas Post arrived at a point four miles below the enemy's work Fifteen miles had to be marched over before the back of Arkansas Post could be reached, and the major part of the night wa and use their howitzers as circumstances would admit. Arkansas Post was a large, well constructed fort built with the bed by the enemy on hearing of the capture of Fort Hindman (Arkansas Post). General McClernand assumed all the direction ofer. General Grant did not approve of this movement on Arkansas Post when he first heard of it, as he thought it improperiscouraging defeat, he became reconciled to the attack on Arkansas Post, though it was a side movement and could in no way c overthrow of Vicksburg. Certain it is, the success at Arkansas Post had a most exhilarating effect on the troops, and th
Milford (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
command, and after the prisoners were received and sent off in transports and the forts and guns demolished as far as could be done by the Army, the fleet and transports retraced their steps towards Vicksburg, and landed at Milliken's Bend or Young's Point about seven miles above Vicksburg. The fight at Fort Hindman was one of the prettiest little affairs of the war, not so little either, for a very important post fell into our hands with 6,500 prisoners, and the destruction of a powerful rae so offensive to Generals Sherman and McPherson, and to Admiral Porter, that they urged General Grant to take command himself as the only chance for the success of the enterprise, and in consequence, the latter hastened to Milliken's Bend or Young's Point and assumed the command of all the forces, which he was entitled to do, being military commander of the department. Mississippi Squadron, January 1, 1863. (excepting some of the vessels engaged at Vicksburg.) Acting Rear-Admiral Davi
Milliken's Bend (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
ansports and the forts and guns demolished as far as could be done by the Army, the fleet and transports retraced their steps towards Vicksburg, and landed at Milliken's Bend or Young's Point about seven miles above Vicksburg. The fight at Fort Hindman was one of the prettiest little affairs of the war, not so little either, forksburg. Certain it is, the success at Arkansas Post had a most exhilarating effect on the troops, and they were a different set of men when they arrived at Milliken's Bend than they were when they left the Yazoo River. After the troops were settled in their tents opposite Vicksburg, it became apparent that there could be no hPorter, that they urged General Grant to take command himself as the only chance for the success of the enterprise, and in consequence, the latter hastened to Milliken's Bend or Young's Point and assumed the command of all the forces, which he was entitled to do, being military commander of the department. Mississippi Squadron
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
ed to do, being military commander of the department. Mississippi Squadron, January 1, 1863. (excepting some of the vessels engaged at Vicksburg.) Acting Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commander-in-Chief. Receiving-ship Clara Dolson. (Cairo.) Lieutenant-Commander, Thomas Pattison, Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Emile Gavarret; Paymaster, Edward May; Acting-Master, John C. Bunner; Acting-Ensigns, E. C. Van Pelt and D. W. Tainter; Acting-Master's Mates, H. G. Masters and John D. Holmes; Wilmot Duley; Acting-Engineers, Geo. Kimber and C. F. Yager. Steam-tug Lilly. Acting-Ensign, Richard H. Smith; Acting Engineers, James Miller and J. C. Jones. Steam-tug Myrtle. Acting-Engineer, Thomas Guernsey. Naval station at Cairo, ill. Commander, Alex. M. Pennock, Fleet-Captain; Paymaster, A. E. Watson, Inspector-in-charge; W. Brenton Boggs, Purchasing Paymaster and Navy Agent; E. W. Dunn, Paymaster attached to Squadron; A. H. Gilman, Paymaster attached to Station; Acting
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
r, not so little either, for a very important post fell into our hands with 6,500 prisoners, and the destruction of a powerful ram at Little Rock, which could have caused the Federal Navy in the West a great deal of trouble, was ensured. In the battle, everything went on so smoothly, there were no mistakes made, and the officers and seamen gained confidence in the gun-boats which they lacked before. But these had been much strengthened and improved since the battles of Forts Donelson and Henry, and had entire new guns on them instead of the inferior batteries they started out with; moreover, the officers had learned that the way to fight these batteries was at close quarters. Lieutenant-Commanders Walker, Owen, Bache, Shirk, Watson, Smith, Woodworth, Breese, and the commander of the Monarch were all handsomely mentioned by Casemate no. 2 destroyed by the U. S. Gun-boat Louisville. Rear view of casemate no. 2. the admiral in his report to the Navy Department. This battle
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
rnsey. Naval station at Cairo, ill. Commander, Alex. M. Pennock, Fleet-Captain; Paymaster, A. E. Watson, Inspector-in-charge; W. Brenton Boggs, Purchasing Paymaster and Navy Agent; E. W. Dunn, Paymaster attached to Squadron; A. H. Gilman, Paymaster attached to Station; Acting-Lieutenant, J. P. Sandford, Ordnance Officer; Acting-Chief-Engineer, W. D. Faulkner, Superintendent; Acting-Chief-Engineer, Samuel Bickerstaff, Superintendent of light draughts; Acting-Master John W. Atkinson, Superintendent of tugs; Acting-Ensign, Peter O'Kell, Executive-Officer; Acting-Ensign, A. H. Edson, and Gunner, John T. Ritter on Ordnance Duty. Marine officers. Captain, Mathew R. Kintzing; 1st Lieutenants, Frank Munroe and S. H. Mathews; 2nd Lieutenant, Frank L. Church. Officer at naval rendezvous, Cincinnati. Acting-Master, A. S. Brown. Officers at naval station, Memphis. Acting-Master, John R. Neild; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Wm. P. Baird; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. H. Benton.
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 25
d off in the steamer Blue wing, but these were recaptured at Duvall's Bluff, shipped in cars ready to be transported to Little Rock, the Confederates deserting the place. The railroad depot was destroyed by fire, all the rolling stock burned, and all the munitions of war placed on board the transports. This was the last expedition necessary to send up the White River for some time. It remained open during the war excepting on several occasions when guerillas infested its banks. The Arkansas River also remained open; its difficult navigation offered no inducement for any one to seek adventures in its treacherous waters. To show how carelessly the history of the war of the Rebellion has been written as regards the Navy, the following quotation from a military historian is inserted here: McClernand immediately acquiesced in Sherman's proposition and moved his force up the Arkansas, the fleet under Porter accompanying. A naval bombardment lasting several days occurred, and on
St. Charles, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
n storms the fort in the rear. the Army meets with an unexpected reception. the fort surrenders. the honor of the defenders of the fort dimmed. Harrowing scenes. terrible loss of life. McClernand on hand. expedition up the White River. St. Charles deserted. munitions of war captured. Grant assumes command of all the forces. The expedition against Arkansas Post arrived at a point four miles below the enemy's works, January 10th, 1863. The Army landed without delay at 10 A. M., an George Bache in the Cincinnati, were sent up the White River to capture the forts erected there by the Confederates, and General Gorman, U. S. A., accompanied the expedition with troops in the transports On the arrival of the expedition at St. Charles, the fort under construction was evacuated and the guns carried off in the steamer Blue wing, but these were recaptured at Duvall's Bluff, shipped in cars ready to be transported to Little Rock, the Confederates deserting the place. The railr
White River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
eption. the fort surrenders. the honor of the defenders of the fort dimmed. Harrowing scenes. terrible loss of life. McClernand on hand. expedition up the White River. St. Charles deserted. munitions of war captured. Grant assumes command of all the forces. The expedition against Arkansas Post arrived at a point four miirectly after the capture of Fort Hindman, Lieutenant-Commander Walker in the De Kalb, and Lieutenant-Commander George Bache in the Cincinnati, were sent up the White River to capture the forts erected there by the Confederates, and General Gorman, U. S. A., accompanied the expedition with troops in the transports On the arrivalyed by fire, all the rolling stock burned, and all the munitions of war placed on board the transports. This was the last expedition necessary to send up the White River for some time. It remained open during the war excepting on several occasions when guerillas infested its banks. The Arkansas River also remained open; its di
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