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Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
have continued there under such a fire. The military historian whom we have quoted was wrong, for every gun in the fort was rendered useless by the shot and shells from the gun-boats; only one gun could be fired and that could not be trained, owing to the destruction of its carriage. Some of the guns in the lower batteries were still intact, and these opened on the fleet. In the evening, the guns were all dismounted by the sailors and laid along the levee, where they could be shipped to Cairo. The following is a copy of a report made by T. M. Farrell, U. S. N., May, 1863: These batteries mounted one 100-pounder, two 64-pounders, two 7-inch rifles, one 30-pounder Parrott, two 30-pounder Parrotts in battery, two 20-pounder Parrotts in main magazine, three 10-pounder Parrotts on the hills. Batteries engaged by the gun-boats for five hours and thirty-five minutes, the lower battery silenced in three hours, the upper battery silenced with the exception of one gun. The Lafaye
Alexandria (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
ngly fortified. The works were shelled for some time with little apparent effect and after destroying a large amount of Confederate Army stores, amounting to three hundred thousand dollars in value, the gun-boats returned to Red River, and the Benton and consorts proceeded to Grand Gulf to co-operate with General Grant in any of his plans where the Navy could be useful. Thus within ten days the flag-ship and her consorts, after dismantling the fortifications at Grand Gulf, had ascended Red River, had destroyed the works at Fort DeRussy, broken up an immense raft intended to obstruct Red River, captured Alexandria, destroyed a large amount of the enemy's stores on Black River, and returned to Grand Gulf, where it was found that General Grant had moved his Army towards Vicksburg. The whole squadron then ascended the river to a point two miles below Vicksburg and the admiral again hoisted his flag on board the Black Hawk, at Young's Point, ready to communicate with General Grant t
Youngs Point (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
e vessels, the latter would have endeavored to get close enough to use grape and canister, which might have made quite a difference in the state of affairs. As it was, everything turned out to General Sherman's satisfaction, and returning to Young's Point, he started with his division to join General Grant, crossing the river at Grand Gulf and overtaking the main body of the Army in time to be present during the important events which laid Vicksburg at the mercy of the Federal Army. After Gd to Grand Gulf, where it was found that General Grant had moved his Army towards Vicksburg. The whole squadron then ascended the river to a point two miles below Vicksburg and the admiral again hoisted his flag on board the Black Hawk, at Young's Point, ready to communicate with General Grant the moment his Army should arrive in the rear of the besieged city. In less than a month, the Mississippi squadron had passed through a sharp and exciting campaign, had failed in nothing it had unde
Big Black (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
he was anxious to give him an opportunity for distinction, might have hazarded the success of the campaign. Had McClernand pushed on at once with the Navy to back him Grand Gulf and its batteries would have easily fallen into Federal hands; Big Black River, which led up to the rear of Jackson, would have been kept open by the gun-boats; and the main Army instead of having to land at Bruensburg, eight or ten miles below Grand Gulf, could have disembarked at the latter point and marched to the rtration was really a fine one, calculated to impress the Confederates, who had seen so many nondescripts pass Vicksburg that they hardly knew a gun-boat from a transport. While Pemberton was making his preparations to meet Grant's Army on Big Black River, he received a dispatch informing him that Haines' Bluff was the real point of attack and that a large Army supported by numerous gun-boats was moving against that place. It was desirable that the Confederates should be encouraged in the be
Steele's Bayou (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
to the rapid fire of shells, shrapnel, grape and canister from the gun-boats, the sharpshooters were glad to lay low, and the men at the great guns gave up in disgust when they saw the fleet drift on apparently unscathed. They must have known that Vicksburg was doomed, for if the fleet got safely below the batteries their supplies of provisions from Texas would be cut off and they would have to depend on what they could receive from Richmond. General Steele had been sent up to the Steele's Bayou region to destroy all the provisions in that quarter, and Pemberton knew that if Grant's Army once got below Vicksburg it would eat up everything in the way of food between Warrenton and Bruensburg. Although the squadron was under fire from the time of passing the first battery until the last vessel got by, a period of two hours and thirty minutes, the vessels were struck in their hulls but sixty-eight times by shot and shells, and only fifteen men were wounded. At 2.30 A. M., all th
Bald Head (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
Little Gibraltar. The principal work called Bald Head, was on a bold bluff promontory at a bend ins. The lower forts were half a mile below Bald Head, and were connected with the latter by intren the troops arrived at the point abreast of Bald Head, and the soldiers on the transports were reabatteries had been signalled to double up on Bald Head, the Lafayette to resume her old position, ar all the vessels concentrated their fire on Bald Head, there was less resistance, although the Cone gun-boats maintained their position around Bald Head, occasionally firing a shell to keep the enetages; the current around the pro montory of Bald Head ran with great rapidity, and it was as much se. Colonel Wade, the commanding officer at Bald Head, was killed; his chief-of-staff also, and eloops evacuated all the works. The fort at Bald Head, on Point of Rocks, was left intact, and a tt holding out so determinedly as this one at Bald Head. The destruction wrought inside the work wa[1 more...]
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
fleet drift on apparently unscathed. They must have known that Vicksburg was doomed, for if the fleet got safely below the batteries their supplies of provisions from Texas would be cut off and they would have to depend on what they could receive from Richmond. General Steele had been sent up to the Steele's Bayou region to destroy all the provisions in that quarter, and Pemberton knew that if Grant's Army once got below Vicksburg it would eat up everything in the way of food between Warrenton and Bruensburg. Although the squadron was under fire from the time of passing the first battery until the last vessel got by, a period of two hours and thirty minutes, the vessels were struck in their hulls but sixty-eight times by shot and shells, and only fifteen men were wounded. At 2.30 A. M., all the vessels were safely anchored at Carthage, ten miles below Vicksburg, where was encamped the advanced division of the Army under General McClernand. The plantation at this place was
Yazoo River (United States) (search for this): chapter 28
se, on a dark night, passed down in charge of their pilots — a daring set of men who never shrunk from any dangerous service,--only one steamer was sunk by the enemy's shot. A sufficient number of gun boats had been left at the mouth of the Yazoo River to take care of the upper Mississippi, and to look out for two formidable rams that were building at Yazoo City, forty miles from the mouth of the river. Sherman remained with his division at Young's Point, ready to make another attack frombe appreciated by those who know the difficulties with which he had to contend, and particularly the nature of the country through which he had to march his Army. General Grant had made arrangements for Sherman's division to make a feint up Yazoo River the same day the gun-boats attacked Grand Gulf. Accordingly, on that day Sherman moved up the Yazoo in transports preceeded by the gun-boats, as the military historian puts it. Most of these gun-boats were what were called workshops, i. e., t
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
n three hours, the upper battery silenced with the exception of one gun. The Lafayette laid opposite this battery and kept the people from working until dark, when it was partially repaired. The defences were all earthworks. In addition to the above, four or five small field-pieces were used by the rebels and shifted about from place to place. Admiral Farragut was still at the mouth of Red River in the flag-ship Hartford, where he had remained ever since he had made the passage by Port Hudson, and Admiral Porter having left Lieutenant-Commander Owen in charge at Grand Gulf with the Louisville and Tuscumbia, proceeded down the river to meet Farragut and relieve him of the command of that part of the river. On the 3d of May, 1863, Admiral Porter reached the mouth of Red River and after conferring with Admiral Farragut, proceeded up that stream with the Benton. Lafayette, Pittsburg, General Price, tug Ivy and ram Switzerland. Meeting two of Admiral Farragut's vessels, the Ari
Harrisonburg, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
fiercely contested. the Benton's wheel disabled. damages to the vessels. the gun-boats tie up at hard times. burying the dead. the attack renewed. the Confederates stand to their guns. so-called history. Grant's brightest chapter. attack on Haines' Bluff. Captain Walke captures sharpshooters. Grand Gulf captured. Porter confers with Farragut. up the Red River. Fort Derussy partially destroyed. capture of Alexandria. General Banks takes possession up the Black River. Harrisonburg shelled. operations of the Mississippi squadron summarized. The Army had already moved on the 15th of April, 1863, and that night was selected for the naval vessels to pass the batteries of Vicksburg. Orders had been given that the coal in the furnaces should be well ignited, so as to show no smoke, that low steam should be carried, that not a wheel was to turn except to keep the vessel's bow down river, and to drift past the enemy's works fifty yards apart. Most of the vessels
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