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Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
Lexington. sister-ship to the Taylor, and one of the gun-boats that had braved the storm of battle at Belmont, Shiloh, Fort Henry, Donelson and Arkansas Post. The Confederates were again assembling in White River, where it was easy for them to geed. Lieutenant-Commander S. L. Phelps performed important service in the Tennessee River, his command extending from Fort Henry as far up stream as his vessels could ascend. He chose command of this district to enable him to attend to the reconstruction of the Eastport, a vessel captured by him in the Tennessee after the fall of Fort Henry. At the time of her capture the Confederates were transforming the vessel into an iron-clad ram. This was the Eastport, hitherto mentioned in our narratiland parties of sufficient force to cope with the enemy, he made an arrangement with Lieutenant-Colonel Breckenridge at Fort Henry to supply a body of cavalry for the purpose. There was a conscription party at Linden, Tennessee, which had made its
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
field of battle. During the whole war bitterness and treachery flourished in Tennessee owing to this guerilla system. In some parts of the State almost every familable energy and perseverance of Fitch won the approbation of the Union men in Tennessee, and gained the entire confidence of his Commander-in-chief. His officers wert work of the Confederates, who had really been a scourge to both parties in Tennessee. General Ellet's command included cavalry, with which he made night marcheed great numbers of boats and scows and all the ferry-boats they could find. Tennessee became not only a battle-ground for the contending armies, but her vindictiveape conscription; for at that time the enemy had strong parties going through Tennessee seizing upon all the able-bodied men they could find to recruit the Confederave served against the Union. Thus the Confederate government, after dragging Tennessee out of the Union, making it the theatre of war, destroying its resources and
Bayou Macon (United States) (search for this): chapter 30
he same time that the expedition was sent up the Yazoo another was dispatched up the Red River, ascending the Black and Tensas Rivers. Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge penetrated to the head of navigation on the latter stream, at Tensas Lake and Bayou Macon, thirty miles above Vicksburg, and within five or six miles of the Mississippi River. Parties of the enemy's riflemen were in the habit of crossing this narrow strip of land and firing upon transports passing up and down the Mississippi, sor, considering themselves secure from the attacks of the gun-boats, the distance by water from Vicksburg being so great: the route being first to the mouth of the Red River, then up the Black and Tensas, both narrow streams, to Tensas Lake and Bayou Macon. The guerillas fancied they could carry on their raids with impunity. So when Selfridge appeared with his little flotilla on the 12th of July, they were taken by surprise. As soon as the gun-boats hove in sight the enemy's transports, of wh
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
d, and steamboats on the river were hailed by deserters from Price's army, asking to be taken on board. No troops were ever worse beaten or more demoralized. Although the Union troops hadstood manfully against the attack of Price's apparently overwhelming force, the slaughter in the enemy's ranks was due to the judgment shown by Lieutenant-Commander Prichett in taking such an admirable position, where he could use his guns effectively. On two previous occasions — at Belmont and at Pittsburg Landing — the Taylor had saved the day to the Union cause, yet we doubt if a vast majority of the American people are aware that such a vessel ever existed, and we deem it only fair to say that the garrison of Helena, although they fought with a courage unsurpassed during the war, owed their victory over an enemy which so greatly outnumbered them entirely to the batteries of the sturdy wooden gun-boat. General Prentiss, like a brave soldier as he was, grows eloquent in his praise of Lieutenan
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
rposes, where a strong shot was liable to send them to the bottom. After the loss of the Cincinnati, on which occasion Lieutenant Bache and his officers and men exhibited so much coolness and bravery, Bache was ordered to Command the Lexington. sister-ship to the Taylor, and one of the gun-boats that had braved the storm of battle at Belmont, Shiloh, Fort Henry, Donelson and Arkansas Post. The Confederates were again assembling in White River, where it was easy for them to get from Little Rock. Arkansas, and escape back again if attacked. Lieutenant-Commander Bache was ordered up White River to suppress these raiders, whose zeal and persistency seemed without limit. The great Confederate armies of the West appeared to have been divided into small bodies, which could move with greater celerity. The Lexington, Cricket and Marmora were the vessels comprising Lieutenant Bache's command. On the arrival of the expedition at Des Arc, it burned a large warehouse filled with Confe
Lake Providence (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ade so glorious by the capture of Vicksburg and the victory of Gettysburg. On the 9th of August the Mound City, Lieutenant-Commander Byron Wilson, while at Lake Providence, gave the enemy a severe lesson. Captain John McNeil, C. S. A., notorious raider, made a descent on Lake Providence with some seventy men, for the purpose ofLake Providence with some seventy men, for the purpose of carrying off some mules, horses and wagons, a number of the latter having congregated there during the occupation pation of the place by a part of the Federal army. As McNeil's men entered the town the Mound City opened on them with her portbattery and the enemy fled to the woods, leaving seven dead on the field and carrying off many wounded. The enemy never expected to see an ironclad at Lake Providence and never troubled the place again. It was exceedingly difficult to suppress this system of guerilla warfare, but it was finally put an end to by the Navy when the surrender of Vicksburg relieved a large number of gun-boats from imperative duties whi
Florence, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
fifty horses and equipments, two transportation wagons, arms, etc. The Court House, which was the rendezvous of the conscriptors, was burned with a quantity of arms and stores. The Union party lost only a horse killed. This was the end of the conscription business in that quarter. In the latter part of June, 1863, Lieutenant-Commander Phelps crossed fifteen hundred cavalry under Colonel Conger, of the 10th Missouri Volunteers, over the river. Colonel Conger made a forced march on Florence, Alabama, and captured the place after a sharp engagement. The expedition destroyed an immense amount of property of various kinds, valued at two millions of dollars, among which were three large cotton mills and magazines of corn; they also captured sixty-five prisoners. Meanwhile one hundred and fifty cavalry had landed at Savannah, under cover of the guns of the Covington, intending to operate in that neighborhood and keep open communication between Colonel Conger and the gun-boats. The
Yazoo River (United States) (search for this): chapter 30
was still much to be done in the vicinity, particularly in driving off the Confederates, who lingered on the banks of the Yazoo and fired on our small gun-boats as they patrolled that river. A report reached Vicksburg that General Joseph E. Johnse the siege to be raised — while Haines' Bluff could block the way with its guns and the huge raft which filled up the Yazoo River for half a mile. The Confederates worked on their iron-clads without molestation, and even when General Grant had gaius explosions showed where arms and ammunition had been secreted. On the 29th of May the Marine Brigade reached the Yazoo River, after having performed much valuable service. After the Brigade left the Tennessee River the guerillas re-commencey did not soon forget, and having completely routed the enemy re-embarked his command and returned to the mouth of the Yazoo River. We have dwelt on these events to show the character of the war as waged by the Confederates in that section of the
Tensas River (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
k on the rams. If the Arkansas, which ran the gauntlet of Farragut and Davis' squadrons, was a specimen of the iron-clad that could be built at Yazoo City, the Federals had cause to congratulate themselves that the Yazoo was open by the evacuation of Haines' Bluff, and the last attempt of the Confederates to carry on naval operations in that quarter abandoned. At the same time that the expedition was sent up the Yazoo another was dispatched up the Red River, ascending the Black and Tensas Rivers. Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge penetrated to the head of navigation on the latter stream, at Tensas Lake and Bayou Macon, thirty miles above Vicksburg, and within five or six miles of the Mississippi River. Parties of the enemy's riflemen were in the habit of crossing this narrow strip of land and firing upon transports passing up and down the Mississippi, sometimes killing women and children who happened to be on board. Quite a large force of Confederates were assembled in that qua
Red River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
itary expedition to Yazoo City. capture of the enemy's works. the Baron deKalb blown up by torpedoes. expedition up the Red, Black and Tensas Rivers, under Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge. destruction of enemy's vessels and stores. the marine brite River. A little later, Volunteer-Lieutenant J. P. Couthouy, commanding the Osage, who had been sent to cruise in Red River, receiving information of a Confederate steamer tied to the bank in his neighborhood, fitted out an expedition of twent across Atchafalia Bay. The other steamer was filled with military stores. There was an impassable shoal across the Red River at that time, and as Chief Engineer Doughty could not take the steamers out of the river he burned them with all their imits than ever. After the capture of Vicksburg the gun-boats were stationed all along the Mississippi from Cairo to Red River, and on the Ohio, Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers. The gun-boats were in divisions extending between specified points,
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