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r Goldsborough reports to the Department an engagement which took place on the James River between some gun-boats under Commander John Rodgers and a heavy battery on Drury's Bluff (a high point commanding a long reach of the river). The vessels which attacked this stronghold were the iron-clad (so-called) Galena, Commander John Rodgers, the Monitor, Lieutenant W. N. Jeffers, and the unarmored steamers Aroostook, Port Royal and Naugatuck. These vessels moved up the James River on the 15th of May and encountered no artificial impediments until they reached Drury's Bluff, eight miles below Richmond, where the Confederates had erected batteries and placed two separate obstructions in the river. These barriers were made by driving piles, and sinking vessels loaded with stone. It was said that the enemy's gun-boats, Jamestown and Yorktown, were among the vessels sunk. It cannot be doubted that these obstacles were too formidable for the gun-boats to pass, unless they could succee
oint, where the American flag was hoisted. The Corwin, Lieutenant T. S. Phelps, and the Currituck, Acting-Master W. F. Shankland, pushed on some twelve miles further up. Commander T. H. Patterson, in the Chocura, proceeded up the river as far as Lieutenant-Commander (now Rear-Admiral) T. S. Phelps. West Point, which had been deserted by the enemy. White flags were flying all along the river. A few small vessels were captured, but the enemy had fled from that quarter. About the 7th of June, Flag-officer Goldsborough was ordered by the President to make an attack on Sewell's Point and to ascertain the possibility of landing a body of troops thereabouts. The wooden vessels were to enfilade the works, while the Monitor, accompanied by the Stevens, went up as far as the wrecks to engage the Merrimac in case she made her appearance. The Monitor had orders to fall back into fair channel-way and only to engage the Merrimac seriously in such a position that the Minnesota, toget
under his command. operations in the Blackwater River under Lieutenant Flusser. the gun-boats extricate themselves from a dilemma. notice of Lieutenant Cushing, his attack on the town of Jacksonville and his gallant defence of the Ellis. capture of Fort Macon by the Army and Navy. surrender of Yorktown, May 5, 1862. co-operation of the Navy. attack on Sewell's Point by Flag-officer Goldsborough. evacuation of Sewell's Point and Craney Island. Merrimac blown up by the Confederates, June 11. Susquehanna, Seminole and Dakota anchor before Norfolk. the retreating enemy set fire to the Navy Yard. attack on Drury's Bluff by Commander John Rodgers with the Galena, the Monitor, and other vessels. remarks on the services of the North Atlantic Squadron. Flag-officer Goldsborough and Commander Rowan receive the thanks of congress. attack on Hamilton by Lieutenant Flusser. attack on Confederate troops at Washington, N. C., by Lieutenant R. T. Renshaw. blowing up of the Army gun-
conspicuous. The President considered that his services in the sounds of North Carolina entitled him to a vote of thanks from Congress and sent in his name, and afterwards that of Commander Rowan. Goldsborough was a Southerner by birth, and although no officer deserves particular credit for standing by the Government that had taken care of him for fifty years, yet he showed an example of live patriotism which entitled him to respect and to any honors his country had to bestow. From July 11th up to November 30th, 1862. there was little done by the North Atlantic squadron except in the sounds of North Carolina. which for a time were under the control of Commander Rowan. The operations in the sounds, after the time mentioned, were not of a very important nature, but as they form part of the history of the war we will give a brief sketch of them. There was great danger in some of the expeditions, and good judgment and gallantry shown in all. Lieutenant C. W. Flusser, who
October 3rd (search for this): chapter 35
avy Department for carrying on the war in this important section of the Confederate strongholds had been carried out with a judgment and success which entitled all concerned to the highest praise. In the latter part of September, 1862, a joint expedition of the Army and Navy was prepared to operate against Franklin, a small town on the Blackwater River. It was agreed between the military commander, General Dix, and the commander of the gun-boats, that the attack should be made on the 3d of October. The expedition was under the command of Lieutenant C. W. Flusser, on board the steamer Commodore Perry. Acting-Lieutenant Edmund R. Colhoun commanded the Hunchback. and Acting-Master Charles A. French the Whitehead. On the morning of October 3d, 1862, the three above-mentioned steamers got underway and proceeded up the river, which was so crooked and narrow in some places that these vessels, small as they were, could not turn the bends without the aid of hawsers. At 7 o'clock th
e harbor of Beaufort was in the hands of the Federals and part of the coast of North Carolina was under blockade. All of which, when closely examined, exhibits as much gallantry, energy and hard work, in proportion to the means at hand and the objects in view, as appears elsewhere. List of vessels and officers in the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-Admiral L. M. Goldsborough. Commander A. Ludlow Case, captain of the fleet. Obtained from the Secretary's report of 1862, and Navy register of Sept. 1862. Steam-frigate Minnesota--Flag-ship. Commander, A. L. Case; Lieutenant-Commanders, E. C. Grafton and John Watters; Lieutenant, Adolphus Dexter; Midshipman, R. S. Chew; Fleet Surgeon, W. M. Wood; Surgeon, J. S. Kitchen; Assistant Surgeons, S. J. Jones, Edgar Holden and E. R. Dodge; Paymaster, Robert Pettit; Chaplain, T. G. Salter; Captain of Marines, W. L. Shuttleworth; First-Lieutenant of Marines, W. H. Cartter; Chief Engineer, C H. Loring; Assistant Eng
January 19th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 35
is a striking evidence of the justice of our cause, and must have its effect in teaching our deluded countrymen a lesson in humanity and civilization. S. C. Rowan, Commanding Flotilla, Albemarle Sound, For the present we must discontinue the narrative of operations in the sounds of North Carolina. As has been seen, there was scarcely a large gun left in the hands of the enemy, of the many that were mounted when the little naval flotilla entered the sounds through Hatteras Inlet, January 19, 1862, and the preparations which were made by the Navy Department for carrying on the war in this important section of the Confederate strongholds had been carried out with a judgment and success which entitled all concerned to the highest praise. In the latter part of September, 1862, a joint expedition of the Army and Navy was prepared to operate against Franklin, a small town on the Blackwater River. It was agreed between the military commander, General Dix, and the commander of the g
February 11th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 35
eries, around which the enemy's gun-boats had assembled for safety and protection. The good account his officers and men gave of themselves in their various encounters with the enemy drew from Commander Rowan the following General Order, which is as remarkable for the handsome compliments it pays to all who served under him, as for its brevity and truthfulness; he could have said no more had he used a folio of words: Order.United States Steamer Delaware. off Elizabeth City. February 11th, 1862. The commander of the flotilla in Albemarle Sound avails himself of the earliest moment to make a public acknowledgment of the coolness, gallantry and skill displayed by the officers and men under his command in the capture and destruction of the enemy's batteries and squadron at Cobb's Point. The strict observance of the plan of attack and the steady but onward course of the ships, without returning a shot until within three-fourths of a mile of the fort, excited the admiration
April 25th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 35
st her, but, in doing so, showed his spirit of adventure, risking his life and the lives of his men, and then escaping with his crew, arms, provisions and clothing, setting fire to his vessel and training her guns upon the enemy so that she might give them a broadside as she went out of existence. Among the captures made by co-operating vessels of the North Atlantic squadron was that of Fort Macon, Beaufort Harbor, N C. A combined expedition of the Army and Navy attacked this place on April 25, 1862, and after a bombardment of some hours, by land and sea, the American flag was hoisted over the fort. The naval part of the expedition consisted of the following vessels under the command of Commander Samuel Lockwood: Steamer Daylight (flag-ship). Steamer State of Georgia.--Commander J. F. Armstrong. Steamer Chippewa.--Lieutenant-Commander A. Bryson. Bark Gemsbok.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Edward Cavendy. Steamer Ellis.--Lieutenant-Commander C. L. Franklin. The gu
May 5th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 35
enant Flusser. the gun-boats extricate themselves from a dilemma. notice of Lieutenant Cushing, his attack on the town of Jacksonville and his gallant defence of the Ellis. capture of Fort Macon by the Army and Navy. surrender of Yorktown, May 5, 1862. co-operation of the Navy. attack on Sewell's Point by Flag-officer Goldsborough. evacuation of Sewell's Point and Craney Island. Merrimac blown up by the Confederates, June 11. Susquehanna, Seminole and Dakota anchor before Norfolk. thend Navy are somewhat obscure, but it appears that a good deal of damage was inflicted upon the fort in spite of a heavy sea, which rendered the firing from the vessels somewhat uncertain. The gun-boats themselves suffered little damage. On May 5, 1862, Yorktown was evacuated by the Confederates, and General McClellan telegraphed to Captain Wm. Smith of the Wachusett to assist in communicating with Gloucester and to send some of the gun-boats up York River to reconnoitre. The flotilla was
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