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North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
erations of Flag-officer Goldsborough in the sounds of North Carolina. importance of gun-boats in co-operating expeditions aving Commander S. C. Rowan in charge of the sounds of North Carolina. The gallant service performed by Commander Rowan, e manner in which the little flotilla in the sounds of North Carolina operated is worthy of all praise, and confers the highscontinue the narrative of operations in the sounds of North Carolina. As has been seen, there was scarcely a large gun lresident considered that his services in the sounds of North Carolina entitled him to a vote of thanks from Congress and senby the North Atlantic squadron except in the sounds of North Carolina. which for a time were under the control of Commanderaccount of the operations of the Navy in the sounds of North Carolina up to November 10th, 1862, at which time these waters in the hands of the Federals and part of the coast of North Carolina was under blockade. All of which, when closely exam
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
. As soon as Flag-officer Goldsborough received the news of the battle of the Monitor and Merrimac, he returned to Hampton Roads to superintend matters in that quarter, leaving Commander S. C. Rowan in charge of the sounds of North Carolina. Tve fallen into their hands, and could have been retaken at any time by a force of ten thousand men and the vessels at Hampton Roads. Flag-officer Goldsborough, supposing that Sewell's Point and Craney Island might not have surrendered, ordered al in its river communications with the North, in the earlier part of the war, but for the presence of this squadron at Hampton Roads, where it was within easy reach. Without it, the Grand Army of the Potomac could not have been moved so successfullyhanged defeat into victory. It might appear to some people that there was a larger number of vessels lying idle in Hampton Roads than was necessary, and that these might in the earlier part of the war have pushed on up the James and kept that riv
New River Inlet (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
was going on. There was another young officer in the North Atlantic squadron at this time, Lieutenant William B. Cushing, who made a name for himself by his total disregard of danger. He would undertake the most desperate adventures, where it seemed impossible for him to escape death or capture, yet he almost always managed to get off with credit to himself and with loss to the enemy. He commanded the small gun-boat Ellis, and in November, 1862, it struck him that he would enter New River Inlet, push up the river, sweep it clear of vessels, capture the town of Jacksonville or Onslow Courthouse, take the Wilmington mail and destroy any salt-works he could find on the banks. He expected to surprise the enemy on going up, and then fight his way out. Five miles from the mouth of the inlet he came in sight of a vessel bound out with a load of cotton and turpentine. The enemy set fire to her in order to prevent her falling into Cushing's hands; but this officer did not waste ti
Beaufort, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
him the fort surrendered. The losses were small on both sides, which was rather remarkable, as Commander Lockwood states that the interior of the fort was literally covered with fragments of bombs and shells, and many of the guns disabled. Beaufort was a valuable acquisition to the North Atlantic squadron, and a fine rendezvous for the smaller vessels engaged in blockading the coast. With regard to the bombardment, the reports of both Army and Navy are somewhat obscure, but it appears try important place, was in charge of a gun-boat or was garrisoned by soldiers, and most of the Confederate troops that had been sent to resist the Union forces had returned to Richmond, where at that time an attack was expected. The harbor of Beaufort was in the hands of the Federals and part of the coast of North Carolina was under blockade. All of which, when closely examined, exhibits as much gallantry, energy and hard work, in proportion to the means at hand and the objects in view, as
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
he town of Jacksonville and his gallant defence of the Ellis. capture of Fort Macon by the Army and Navy. surrender of Yorktown, May 5, 1862. co-operation of the Navy. attack on Sewell's Point by Flag-officer Goldsborough. evacuation of Sewell'sred the firing from the vessels somewhat uncertain. The gun-boats themselves suffered little damage. On May 5, 1862, Yorktown was evacuated by the Confederates, and General McClellan telegraphed to Captain Wm. Smith of the Wachusett to assist in and it would probably make confusion if the writer attempted to remedy the evil. When General McClellan had captured Yorktown he almost immediately moved part of his army up the river in transports in the direction of West Point. On the 7th ofrn foremost. General Franklin's object in advancing on West Point was to cut off the retreat of the Confederates from Yorktown. But he encountered a much larger force than he had expected, and but for the gun-boats would have been roughly handled
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
twelve miles further up. Commander T. H. Patterson, in the Chocura, proceeded up the river as far as Lieutenant-Commander (now Rear-Admiral) T. S. Phelps. West Point, which had been deserted by the enemy. White flags were flying all along the river. A few small vessels were captured, but the enemy had fled from that quarte to remedy the evil. When General McClellan had captured Yorktown he almost immediately moved part of his army up the river in transports in the direction of West Point. On the 7th of May, 1862, Lieutenant T. H. Stevens reported that, hearing the firing of heavy cannon, he proceeded on board the Lieutenant Leonard Paulding the river became so narrow and crooked that they could go no farther, and in returning had to drop stern foremost. General Franklin's object in advancing on West Point was to cut off the retreat of the Confederates from Yorktown. But he encountered a much larger force than he had expected, and but for the gun-boats would have
Lorenzo Traver (search for this): chapter 35
letta and Para. frigate St. Lawrence. Captain, H. Y. Purviance, and Commander J. F. Schenck [at different times in command]; Lieutenant, H. F. Picking; Acting-Masters, G. L. Allyn, G. J. Murray and Wm. H. Smith; Second-Lieutenant of Marines, R. S. Collum; Acting-Master's Mates, John Fisher, V. W. Jones and T. W. Jones; Boatswain, J. A. Briscoe; Gunner, C. De Bevoise; Carpenter, J. A. Krim; Sailmaker, L. Rogers. Steamer Delaware. Lieutenant-Commander. S. P. Quackenbush; Assistant Surgeon, Lorenzo Traver; Assistant Paymaster, F. R. Curtis; Acting-Ensign, J. H. Kerens; Acting-Engineers, J. D. Williamson, T. J. Brown, A. Dunbar and James Mellen; Acting-Master's Mate, J. H. Springman. Sloop-of-war Cumberland. Commander, William Radford; Lieutenants, George U. Morris, T. O. Selfridge, and M. S. Stuyvesant; Chaplain, J. H. Lenhart; Acting-Masters, W. P. Randall and W. W. Kennison; Surgeon, Charles Martin; Assistant Surgeon, Edward Kershner; Lieutenant of Marines, Charles Haywo
Edward Cavendy (search for this): chapter 35
g vessels under the command of Commander Samuel Lockwood: Steamer Daylight (flag-ship). Steamer State of Georgia.--Commander J. F. Armstrong. Steamer Chippewa.--Lieutenant-Commander A. Bryson. Bark Gemsbok.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Edward Cavendy. Steamer Ellis.--Lieutenant-Commander C. L. Franklin. The gun-boats attacked the fort by passing it in an ellipse and firing when abreast of it. Major-General Burnside commanded the land forces, and to him the fort surrendered.John Burrows; Gunner, Samuel Cross. Frigate Congress. Lieutenants, Joseph B. Smith and Austin Pendergrnst; Acting-Master, Thomas Moore; Master's Mate, Peter J. Hargous; Pilot, Wm. Rhodes. Bark Gemsbok. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Edward Cavendy; Acting-Masters, J. E. Giddings, O. Thatcher. T. Werthoff and Samuel Very; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Thomas Welch; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. H. Roberts. Ship supply. Commander, Geo. Colvocoresses; Assistant Surgeon, W. L. Wheeler;
H. Dickenson (search for this): chapter 35
l Harman; Acting-Assistant Engineers, John Cohill, John Morse and John Whittaker; Acting-Master's Mates, Wm. K. Engell and Daniel Ward. Steamer Valley City. Lieutenant-Commander, J. C. Chaplin and Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, H. K. Furniss [commanding at different times]; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, F. E. Martindale; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, G. W. Moore; Acting-Assistant Engineers, Perry Short, James Hitchcock and B. Hildebrand; Acting-Master's Mates, C. W. Campbell, John Cullaton, H. Dickenson and T. Langton; Gunner, John Davis. Steamer Victoria. Lieutenant Commander, G. A. Stevens; Acting-Masters, Alfred Everson and H. A. Phelan: Acting-Ensign, W. H. Mayer; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, J. G. Parke; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, H. S. Bradford; Acting-Assistant Engineers, J. M. Barron, E. A. Hurd and T. D. Webster; Acting-Master's Mate, G. B. Howard. Steamer Cambridge. Commander, Wm. A. Parker; Acting-Masters, J. A. J. Brooks; W. H. Maies, F. W. Strong; Acting-Assistant
William H. Kilpatrick (search for this): chapter 35
er, Alfred Colin, L. A. Haverly, T. W. Rae and G. W. Thorn; Acting-Masters, D. A. Campbell,W. G. Saltonstall and Wm. Wright; Boatswain, Paul Atkinson; Gunner, C. W. Homer; Carpenter, Ebenezer Thompson; Sailmaker, A. A. Warren. Steamer Maratanza. Commander, G. H. Scott; Lieutenant-Commander, Wm P. McCann; Assistant Surgeon, Job Corbin; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, C. S. Perley; Acting-Masters, Charles Cortney, Jacob Kimball and J. B. Wood, Jr.; Acting-Engineers, Edward Scattergood, Wm. H. Kilpatrick, L. H. Harvey and R. L. Webb; Acting-Master's Mates, J. Creighton and E. W. Flowers. Steamer Morse. Acting-Masters, Peter Hayes and G. W. Caswell; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Henry Russell, Acting-Assistant Engineers, Thomas Divine, Tim. Flanders and George West; Acting-Master's Mates, William Dunne and C. E. Rich. Iron-clad Monitor. Commanders, John L. Worden, Wm. N. Jeffers and T. H. Stevens [commanding at different times]; Lieutenant, S. Dana Greene; Acting-Volunteer-Lie
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