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England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 40
he Confederates in conse-quence of the stringent blockade of the coast. The Federal Navy had been so far strengthened with a class of vessels superior to anything of which the powers of Europe could boast, that it was no longer anticipated that England or France would interfere in our domestic affairs. The battle of Gettysburg, which caused General Lee to fall back upon Richmond, and the surrender of Port Hudson and Vicksburg, which opened the Mississippi to the sea, were the severest blowsthe Confederacy abroad. The Confederates, as a matter of course, felt the want of the munitions of war they had been accustomed to receive in such quantities through the blockade-runners, particularly great guns and small arms manufactured in England. Every port, from Virginia to Texas, was watched with a zeal that had never before been exerted on such an occasion; for it was felt by the officers of the Navy that this watchfulness would be well rewarded, and the information gained from the
Smithville (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
ld, Dee, Emily, and Fannie and Jennie. boat expedition up Cape Fear River to Smithville. joint Army and Navy expedition up Pamunky River. boat expedition up Chuckake an expedition to Cape Fear River, and capture the Confederate commander at Smithville, where there was a strong fort and a garrison of a thousand men. On the night south inlet of Cape Fear River under cover of the darkness, and proceeded to Smithville, about six miles above, his force consisting of two boats and twenty men. SmiSmithville was a famous resort for blockade-runners, and Cushing intended, if he found any of these vessels at anchor, attempt their capture. Finding no vessels at SmSmithville, Cushing landed directly in front of the hotel, which was the headquarters of the commanding officer, concealed his men under the bank, captured some negroesh, and fifteen men, crossed the western bar, and passed the forts and town of Smithville without discovery. Near the Zeke Island batteries, Cushing came very near be
Bermuda Hundred (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
iver. boat expedition up Chuckatuck Creek. attack on Minnesota by torpedo-boat. Landing of Army at City Point and Bermuda hundred. destruction of U. S. Gun-boat Commodore Jones. Confederate torpedo defences. Monitors engage Howlett's battery. lished without difficulty. Having been joined by General Gillmore on the 4th of May, Butler occupied City Point and Bermuda Hundred on the 5th; on the 6th he was in position with his main force and intrenched, and on the 7th made a reconnaissance ost., and had gone thence to Richmond. On the 5th of May, the army, under General Butler, landed at City Point and Bermuda Hundred, covered by five iron-clads and ten other vessels, without opposition. The river had been carefully dragged for tor obstruct the James River by sinking vessels a mile or so below Howlett's Battery. This would make his positions at Bermuda Hundred and at City Point perfectly secure. Part of the vessels to be used for this purpose were received by Acting-Rear-Ad
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
ng campaign, the Democratic party would be able to overthrow the Administration, and open negotiations for peace with the Confederacy. In accordance with this idea, President Davis prepared to open communication with the Democratic party of the North, and to conduct political negotiations with that party in accordance with the military movements in the coming campaign. The commissioners appointed for this purpose were Messrs. Thompson, of Mississippi, Holcombe, of Virginia, and Clay, of Alabama, who were to proceed to a convenient spot on the northern frontier of the United States, and to use whatever political opportunities the military events of the war might disclose. The commissioners succeeded in running the blockade from Wilmington, and reached Canada, only to find that the Northern sentiment in regard to the Confederacy was practically unanimous, and that all parties were determined to bring the seceding States back into the Union. The Federal Army and Navy in the West
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
bout the middle of May, the North Carolina, an iron-clad resembling the Atlanta, appeared off Fort Fisher, at the mouth of Cape Fear River, accompanied by two tugs. This vessel commenced an attack aons, forts and guns he met along the Cape Fear River, which were useful at a later date, when Fort Fisher and the other defences at the entrance of the river were attacked. Coming to a very narrow ct along through it for some distance, till he reached a road, which was the main highway from Fort Fisher to Wilmington. Here he divided his little party, leaving half of them behind, and marching t they halted and concealed themselves. About noon, a mounted soldier, with a mail-bag from Fort Fisher, came along, and was much astonished when halted by Cushing, and ordered to dismount and delilans. Cushing then waited for the mail-carrier from Wilmington to appear with dispatches for Fort Fisher, but, just as the courier hove in sight, a blue-jacket incautiously exposed himself, and the
Chuckatuck Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
completeness and discipline of U. S. Navy, 1863. position and strength of opposing forces. combined Army and Navy expedition up James and Nansemond Rivers. destruction of blockade-runners Bendigo, ranger, Venus and dare. capture and destruction of U. S. Steamer Underwriter. destruction of blockade-runners wild Dayrell, Nutfield, Dee, Emily, and Fannie and Jennie. boat expedition up Cape Fear River to Smithville. joint Army and Navy expedition up Pamunky River. boat expedition up Chuckatuck Creek. attack on Minnesota by torpedo-boat. Landing of Army at City Point and Bermuda hundred. destruction of U. S. Gun-boat Commodore Jones. Confederate torpedo defences. Monitors engage Howlett's battery. picking up torpedoes. repulse of attack on Wilson's wharf by gun-boats. Confederate iron-clads and gun-boats below Drury's Bluff. sinking of obstructions in James River. letter from General Butler to Acting-Rear-Admiral Lee. Grant's operations. hulks sunk at Trent's reach. att
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
hile the Confederates could not repair the rapid waste of their armies, notwithstanding their most vigorous efforts. In Washington the opinion prevailed that, before the year had elapsed, the authority of the Government would be everywhere restored. This opinion also prevailed in the Navy, which had been strongly reinforced by a class of vessels able to overhaul the swiftest blockade-runners built on the Clyde; so that hardly one out of three vessels succeeded in getting into Wilmington or Mobile — the two principal ports where these illicit traders congregated. The Southern coast was so closely invested by the Navy that it was with great difficulty the blockade-runners could get in or out, although a certain proportion of them managed to elude pursuit, and carry out cargoes of cotton, which served to keep up the financial credit of the Confederacy abroad. The Confederates, as a matter of course, felt the want of the munitions of war they had been accustomed to receive in such qu
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
forces. combined Army and Navy expedition up James and Nansemond Rivers. destruction of blockade Drury's Bluff. sinking of obstructions in James River. letter from General Butler to Acting-Rear Butler to operate on the south side of the James River in conjunction with the Army of the Potomacons, General Butler moved his forces up the James River, where he had the assistance of the Navy totion, although he had the naval vessels on the James and Appomattox Rivers to cover his retreat to t of his campaign, proposed to obstruct the James River by sinking vessels a mile or so below Howlef them, the Tecumseh, was soon to leave the James River for other service. Acting-Rear-Admiral Leehat the squadron could force its way up the James River. There seems to have been a little diplo the Army was safe on the opposite bank of the James, and in communication with the Army of the Jamis is the history of the obstruction of the James River, the credit of which was given to General B[3 more...]
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
he blockade-runner Scotia passed from the anchorage just before Cushing got into the river, or he might have made a good night's work of it. Cushing's hazardous undertakings were sometimes criticised as useless, but there was more method in them than appeared on the surface, and important information was sometimes obtained, to say nothing of the brilliant example of courage and enterprise which they afforded to others. On March 8th Acting-Rear-Admiral Lee accompanied General Butler to Yorktown to arrange a joint military and naval expedition, to operate, first, up the Pamunky River against the Confederate forces near King and Queen Court House, which had attacked the party under command of Colonel Dahlgren, and killed that officer; and, second, against a force of the enemy reported as about to make an expedition from the peninsula. Owing, however, to constant fogs, the gun-boats could not co-operate with the Army, and the Confederates, finding themselves about to be surrounded.
Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. Successful military operations. prospects of Southern independence. Confederate commissioners. completeness and ockade-runners wild Dayrell, Nutfield, Dee, Emily, and Fannie and Jennie. boat expedition up Cape Fear River to Smithville. joint Army and Navy expedition up Pamunky River. boat expedition up Chuckatuck Creek. attack on Minnesota by torpedo-boat. Landing of Army at City Point and Bermuda hundred. destruction of U. S. Gun-boaters. On March 8th Acting-Rear-Admiral Lee accompanied General Butler to Yorktown to arrange a joint military and naval expedition, to operate, first, up the Pamunky River against the Confederate forces near King and Queen Court House, which had attacked the party under command of Colonel Dahlgren, and killed that officer; and, s
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