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Hunter Davidson (search for this): chapter 40
aval officers were preparing to retaliate on the vessels of the North Atlantic squadron lying in Hampton Roads. Lieutenant Hunter Davidson, of the Confederate navy, had given much study to the subject of torpedoes, and had perfected what he considereattered, and the Federals would have lost one of their finest frigates. This daring exploit was performed by Lieutenant Hunter Davidson, who has, no doubt, since rejoiced that he did not succeed in sending many of his old friends and shipmates to the power of the torpedo, when properly managed. The arrangements in this quarter were under the direction of Lieutenant Hunter Davidson; and the man who ignited the torpedo which blew up the Commodore Jones was killed by a musket-ball fired by theus ingenious contrivances. All of them could be put down in one day by a torpedo-boat arranged for the purpose by Lieutenant Davidson, who had been watching the movements of the Federals since the transports first assembled in Hampton Roads. The
Robert Wilkinson (search for this): chapter 40
ives. Some of the men, including the other guard, jumped overboard, and swam ashore, while Allen headed the boat towards the river-bank, landed at the foot of the line of breastworks, and delivered his one prisoner to the commanding officer of the fort. A short time afterwards, the fire reached the Underwriter's magazine, and she blew up. This gallant expedition was led by Commander John Taylor Wood, of the Confederate Navy, who was accompanied by Lieutenants Gardner, Hogue, Carr, and Wilkinson. Acting-Master Jacob Wester-velt, commanding the Underwriter, was killed on board that vessel, as also several of his crew. In this expedition fifteen boats, including three large barges, with three hundred men, came down the river with the intention of making a simultaneous attack on the forts and the gun-boat; but, finding the latter above the forts, where she ought not to have been, she was boarded and captured, with little loss to the enemy. It was to be expected that, with so many
Q. A. Gillmore (search for this): chapter 40
e between Culpeper Court House and Richmond, and in case he should not defeat him he could make a junction with Butler, already established on the James, and be in a position to threaten Richmond on the south side, with his left wing resting on the James, above the city. In accordance with his instructions, General Butler moved his forces up the James River, where he had the assistance of the Navy to cover his landing, which was accomplished without difficulty. Having been joined by General Gillmore on the 4th of May, Butler occupied City Point and Bermuda Hundred on the 5th; on the 6th he was in position with his main force and intrenched, and on the 7th made a reconnaissance of the Petersburg and Richmond Railroad, and destroyed a bridge a few miles from Richmond. From this, General Butler formed the opinion that he had succeeded in getting in the rear of the Confederates, and held the key to the back-door of Richmond. He accordingly telegraphed to Washington: We have landed
Charles H. Cushman (search for this): chapter 40
mund R. Colhoun. enemy's iron-clads could not get down to City Point under any circumstances. The enemy, in order to ascertain the character of the obstructions, made a reconnaissance in the neighborhood of Dutch Gap; while Howlett's Battery, which had been greatly strengthened by the erection of new works, opened upon the vessels below the obstructions. These were the iron-clads Tecumseh. Commander T. A. M. Craven; Saugus, Commander E. R. Colhoun; Onondaga, Lieutenant-Commander C. H. Cushman; Canonicus, Commander E. S. Parrott, and gun-boat Agawam, Lieutenant-Commander A. C. Rhind. They returned the fire of the enemy's batteries with considerable effect, receiving little damage in return; while the Confederate iron-clads, from their position behind a wood. opened a straggling fire, of which no notice was taken. According to one Confederate account, the battery at Howlett's consisted of but four guns--one large rifle, one large smoothbore, and-two smaller pieces. Notwithst
S. P. Quackenbush (search for this): chapter 40
n's wharf, which attack had been anticipated by the naval commander-in-chief, who had placed the following vessels in position to meet it: Pequot, Lieutenant-Commander S. P. Quackenbush; Dawn, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. W. Simmons; Atlanta (iron-clad), and tug Young America--all under Lieutenant-Commander Quackenbush. At 12Lieutenant-Commander Quackenbush. At 12:30, on the 24th, the enemy made a vigorous attack at the wharf; the movement was, however, supposed to be a feint to draw the Union forces from Fort Powhatan. The enemy were met by the fire of the gun-boats, particularly the Dawn; and although their decks were swept by musketry, such was the terrible effect of their shells on thce rendered by the Dawn, Lieutenant Simmons, the Confederates would have, no doubt, accomplished their object and Lieutenant-Commander (now Rear-Admiral) S. P Quackenbush. carried the Union position. The engagement lasted upwards of five hours, and demonstrated the value of the Navy in protecting the flanks of the Federal Army.
Francis A. Roe (search for this): chapter 40
ry fast; but their commanders, rather than be captured, ran them ashore, after throwing overboard what munitions of war they had on board; and the Federal officers, finding it impossible to get them afloat, set them on fire to prevent the enemy receiving any benefit from them. The officers who made themselves particularly active in the performance of blockading duties, and who aided in the destruction of these steamers, were Commanders Pierce Crosby and William F. Spicer, and Lieutenant-Commander Francis A. Roe. Now and then, amid these exciting scenes, the indomitable Lieutenant Cushing came forward with some remarkable feat, more daring than important. Cushing was brave to recklessness, not seeming to care for danger, and his superior officers rather encouraged his wild adventures. In the month of February an idea struck Cushing that he would make an expedition to Cape Fear River, and capture the Confederate commander at Smithville, where there was a strong fort and a garris
Edmund R. Colhoun (search for this): chapter 40
y's Bluff, his fire-rafts, sunken torpedoes, and torpedo-boats, he felt more secure when he knew that his position could not be assailed by a naval force; while General Grant was equally satisfied now that the Commander (now Rear-Admiral) Edmund R. Colhoun. enemy's iron-clads could not get down to City Point under any circumstances. The enemy, in order to ascertain the character of the obstructions, made a reconnaissance in the neighborhood of Dutch Gap; while Howlett's Battery, which had been greatly strengthened by the erection of new works, opened upon the vessels below the obstructions. These were the iron-clads Tecumseh. Commander T. A. M. Craven; Saugus, Commander E. R. Colhoun; Onondaga, Lieutenant-Commander C. H. Cushman; Canonicus, Commander E. S. Parrott, and gun-boat Agawam, Lieutenant-Commander A. C. Rhind. They returned the fire of the enemy's batteries with considerable effect, receiving little damage in return; while the Confederate iron-clads, from their posi
W. F. Smith (search for this): chapter 40
Army of the Potomac, which forces were to operate in conjunction with the Navy as near Richmond as it was possible to get. This was the Army of the James, under Major-General Butler, numbering 20,000 men. General Grant directed Butler to operate on the south side of the James River in conjunction with the Army of the Potomac, the objective point of both being Richmond. To Butler's force was to be added ten thousand men from South Carolina under Major-General Q. A Gillmore, while Major-General W. F. Smith was ordered to report to General Butler to command the troops sent into the field from his Department. General Butler was directed, when his forces were able to move, to seize and hold City Point. Grant intended that, in case the Confederates should be forced by his advance into their intrenchments at Richmond, the Army of the Potomac should follow them up, and by means of transports the two armies would become a unit. It would seem from this that Grant expected to fight Lee b
Samuel Philip Lee (search for this): chapter 40
erior numbers. The whole country, although it lost men enough to have made a dozen large armies, gained greatly in prestige, and taught Europe that our people united were a match for all their powers combined. In February, 1864, Acting-Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, commanding the North Atlantic squadron, was in co-operation with Major-General B. F. Butler, who commanded the army of the James with his headquarters at Fortress Monroe. General Meade commanded the Army of the Potomac, with his headble vessels of the squadron. Pardon me if I have overstepped any line of duty or courtesy in this latter suggestion. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Benj. F. Butler, Major General Commanding. Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. This diplomatic communication of General Butler led to a long correspondence between Acting Rear-Admiral Lee and himself, which ended, as it should have done, in putting the obstructions in the cha
nt on Richmond should be made, which was to bring the civil war to a termination. The available strength of the Federal army on the Potomac, including the Ninth Corps and the reinforcements that were held in Washington, was not less than 170,000 men. The force which the Confederates had to oppose was much inferior, according to their own account. The Confederate Army of the Rapidan, at the beginning of the campaign of 1864, consisted of two divisions of Longstreet's corps with 8,000 men, Ewell's corps of 14,000, Hill's corps of 13,000, three divisions of cavalry, and the artillery. So that, according to Confederate historians, Lee's effective force of infantry did not exceed 40,000 men. The cavalry divisions did not each exceed the proper strength of a brigade, and the artillery was in proportion to the other arms, altogether not over 80,000 men of all arms. But it will not do to rely upon Confederate figures, and General Grant's estimate placed Lee's force at 120,000 men, inclu
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