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Jacob Wester (search for this): chapter 40
men, including the other guard, jumped overboard, and swam ashore, while Allen headed the boat towards the river-bank, landed at the foot of the line of breastworks, and delivered his one prisoner to the commanding officer of the fort. A short time afterwards, the fire reached the Underwriter's magazine, and she blew up. This gallant expedition was led by Commander John Taylor Wood, of the Confederate Navy, who was accompanied by Lieutenants Gardner, Hogue, Carr, and Wilkinson. Acting-Master Jacob Wester-velt, commanding the Underwriter, was killed on board that vessel, as also several of his crew. In this expedition fifteen boats, including three large barges, with three hundred men, came down the river with the intention of making a simultaneous attack on the forts and the gun-boat; but, finding the latter above the forts, where she ought not to have been, she was boarded and captured, with little loss to the enemy. It was to be expected that, with so many clever officers who
William L. Howorth (search for this): chapter 40
and obtained from. them such information as he required. Leaving some men in charge of the boats, Cushing, with Acting-Ensign J. E. Jones, Acting-Master's Mate W. L. Howorth, and one seaman, proceeded to the headquarters of the commanding officer of the defences, General Herbert. Cushing captured the chief-engineer, but ascertan entrance of Cape Fear River. On the night of June 23d he left the vessel in the first cutter, accompanied by Acting-Ensign J. E. Jones, Acting-Master's Mate William L. Howorth, and fifteen men, crossed the western bar, and passed the forts and town of Smithville without discovery. Near the Zeke Island batteries, Cushing came veere squads of soldiers might have been expected to pass along at any moment. The party captured several prisoners, and, at length, becoming hungry, Master's Mate Howorth dressed himself in the courier's clothes, and, mounting the horse, started into town to market. After a time he returned with a supply of milk, eggs and chick
William B. Cushing (search for this): chapter 40
s operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. Successful military operations. prospects of Southern independence. Confederate commissioners. completeness and discipline of U. S. Navy, s operations. hulks sunk at Trent's reach. attack on Petersburg. engagement with Confederate iron-clad at mouth of Cape Fear River. daring adventures of Lieutenant Cushing. The year 1864 opened with flattering prospects for the Union cause, owing to the important successes gained over the enemy in 1863, and the constantly ithe direction of Commodore W. F. Lynch, but were hardly considered fit to go into battle, although they served to keep the blockaders on the look-out. Lieutenant W. B. Cushing, with his usual zeal and enterprise, volunteered to attempt the destruction of the vessel that came out to attack the blockaders, and at the same time ma
C. B. Wilder (search for this): chapter 40
federate forces near King and Queen Court House, which had attacked the party under command of Colonel Dahlgren, and killed that officer; and, second, against a force of the enemy reported as about to make an expedition from the peninsula. Owing, however, to constant fogs, the gun-boats could not co-operate with the Army, and the Confederates, finding themselves about to be surrounded. retreated from the peninsula. A few nights later, a boat expedition, under Acting-Masters Williams and Wilder, of tie Commodore Barney and Minnesota, respectively, ascended the Chuckatuck Creek, and captured a party of twenty Confederate soldiers. While these small affairs were being transacted, the Confederate naval officers were preparing to retaliate on the vessels of the North Atlantic squadron lying in Hampton Roads. Lieutenant Hunter Davidson, of the Confederate navy, had given much study to the subject of torpedoes, and had perfected what he considered an excellent torpedo-boat. It was a
Cornelius Carr (search for this): chapter 40
l for their lives. Some of the men, including the other guard, jumped overboard, and swam ashore, while Allen headed the boat towards the river-bank, landed at the foot of the line of breastworks, and delivered his one prisoner to the commanding officer of the fort. A short time afterwards, the fire reached the Underwriter's magazine, and she blew up. This gallant expedition was led by Commander John Taylor Wood, of the Confederate Navy, who was accompanied by Lieutenants Gardner, Hogue, Carr, and Wilkinson. Acting-Master Jacob Wester-velt, commanding the Underwriter, was killed on board that vessel, as also several of his crew. In this expedition fifteen boats, including three large barges, with three hundred men, came down the river with the intention of making a simultaneous attack on the forts and the gun-boat; but, finding the latter above the forts, where she ought not to have been, she was boarded and captured, with little loss to the enemy. It was to be expected that,
William T. Muse (search for this): chapter 40
down the river with his party in the cutter, retaining one prisoner as a pilot to show him where the ram Raleigh lay a wreck. He hoped also to fall in with and destroy some of the Confederate vessels by setting fire to them. Cushing found that there was nothing left of the Raleigh above water — like most of the Confederate rams, she had been destroyed in a panic. As for the other iron-clad, the North Carolina, his prisoners had told him she was then at anchor off Wilmington under Captain Wm. T. Muse, but that little confidence was placed in her, and that she would not cross the bar. Cushing was also informed that the two torpedo-boats built at Wilmington had been destroyed some time previous in the great cotton fire. As Cushing neared the forts, at the east bar of the river, a boat was seen and captured after a short chase. It contained four soldiers and two civilians, who were taken into the cutter, and their own boat sent adrift. On questioning his prisoners, Cushing found
Acting-Masters Williams (search for this): chapter 40
ver against the Confederate forces near King and Queen Court House, which had attacked the party under command of Colonel Dahlgren, and killed that officer; and, second, against a force of the enemy reported as about to make an expedition from the peninsula. Owing, however, to constant fogs, the gun-boats could not co-operate with the Army, and the Confederates, finding themselves about to be surrounded. retreated from the peninsula. A few nights later, a boat expedition, under Acting-Masters Williams and Wilder, of tie Commodore Barney and Minnesota, respectively, ascended the Chuckatuck Creek, and captured a party of twenty Confederate soldiers. While these small affairs were being transacted, the Confederate naval officers were preparing to retaliate on the vessels of the North Atlantic squadron lying in Hampton Roads. Lieutenant Hunter Davidson, of the Confederate navy, had given much study to the subject of torpedoes, and had perfected what he considered an excellent torp
William F. Spicer (search for this): chapter 40
lockade-runners, as they were very fast; but their commanders, rather than be captured, ran them ashore, after throwing overboard what munitions of war they had on board; and the Federal officers, finding it impossible to get them afloat, set them on fire to prevent the enemy receiving any benefit from them. The officers who made themselves particularly active in the performance of blockading duties, and who aided in the destruction of these steamers, were Commanders Pierce Crosby and William F. Spicer, and Lieutenant-Commander Francis A. Roe. Now and then, amid these exciting scenes, the indomitable Lieutenant Cushing came forward with some remarkable feat, more daring than important. Cushing was brave to recklessness, not seeming to care for danger, and his superior officers rather encouraged his wild adventures. In the month of February an idea struck Cushing that he would make an expedition to Cape Fear River, and capture the Confederate commander at Smithville, where ther
A. S. Gardner (search for this): chapter 40
told the men to pull for their lives. Some of the men, including the other guard, jumped overboard, and swam ashore, while Allen headed the boat towards the river-bank, landed at the foot of the line of breastworks, and delivered his one prisoner to the commanding officer of the fort. A short time afterwards, the fire reached the Underwriter's magazine, and she blew up. This gallant expedition was led by Commander John Taylor Wood, of the Confederate Navy, who was accompanied by Lieutenants Gardner, Hogue, Carr, and Wilkinson. Acting-Master Jacob Wester-velt, commanding the Underwriter, was killed on board that vessel, as also several of his crew. In this expedition fifteen boats, including three large barges, with three hundred men, came down the river with the intention of making a simultaneous attack on the forts and the gun-boat; but, finding the latter above the forts, where she ought not to have been, she was boarded and captured, with little loss to the enemy. It was
curing negative results in the ensuing campaign, the Democratic party would be able to overthrow the Administration, and open negotiations for peace with the Confederacy. In accordance with this idea, President Davis prepared to open communication with the Democratic party of the North, and to conduct political negotiations with that party in accordance with the military movements in the coming campaign. The commissioners appointed for this purpose were Messrs. Thompson, of Mississippi, Holcombe, of Virginia, and Clay, of Alabama, who were to proceed to a convenient spot on the northern frontier of the United States, and to use whatever political opportunities the military events of the war might disclose. The commissioners succeeded in running the blockade from Wilmington, and reached Canada, only to find that the Northern sentiment in regard to the Confederacy was practically unanimous, and that all parties were determined to bring the seceding States back into the Union. The
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