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Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
d from a vast deal of trouble in keeping open communications. Ascertaining that Hood had crossed the Chattahoochie River on the 29th and 30th of September, General Sherman followed him; but finding that Hood was bound for Nashville, he abandoned the pursuit and returned to Atlanta, where he prepared to march to the sea across the State of Georgia. Sherman's calculation was that General Thomas could collect troops at Nashville; which, with the two army corps sent him by Sherman by way of Chattanooga, would enable him to hold the line of the Tennessee. Everything turned out well, and General Thomas gained a victory that dispersed Hood's army in every direction, and administered another crushing blow to the Confederate cause. General Sherman was the more induced to hurry his movements from a telegram sent to him by General Grant, in which the latter says: If you were to cut loose, I do not believe you would meet Hood's army, but you would be bushwhacked by all the old men, little b
Fourmile Creek (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
exposed to the attacks of Confederate artillery, which was continually on the alert to get a shot at them. So active were the enemy, that, about the middle of July, they constructed a battery mounting 20-pounder Sawyer guns on Malvern Hill, and for a time interrupted the navigation of the James River. The Confederates were, in fact, untiring in their efforts to make the Federal troops and gun-boats uncomfortable. On the 28th of July the enemy commenced the erection of batteries at Four Mile Creek, where they had assembled a large force for the purpose of covering the men at work in the trenches, and making a demonstration against General Foster's front. The gun-boats were brought into requisition. and the Agawam, Commander A. C. Rhind, and the Mendota, Commander E. T. Nichols, shelled the enemy's works for some time, rendering very effective service in connection with General Hancock's military operations. The following night, in view of the military movements ordered by Ge
Wilmington River (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
hing in his rear or on his flank to disturb him, and so pursued his devastating march to the sea — that march which is so celebrated in the annals of the civil war. Notwithstanding all the criticisms of the press on his apparent inactivity, Grant waited patiently until he should hear that Sherman was in a position to prevent Lee and his army from escaping southward. When Sherman made a junction at Goldsboro, N. C., with the forces of Generals Schofield and Terry, which had marched from Wilmington to meet him, the fate of the Confederacy was sealed, and Grant moved on Richmond. While Grant was watching the progress of events which we have detailed above, the Federal naval vessels in the James River, under the immediate command of Captain Melancton Smith, were actively engaged in patrolling the river.guarding Trent's Reach, or in any co-operative service called for by General Grant. About the middle of August, the Navy Department wrote to Acting-Rear-Admiral Lee, inquiring if he
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
eneral Peck to General Butler. casualties at Plymouth. attack on Newbern. Acting-Rear-Admiral Lee's instructions to Captain Smith. capturattery; but the naval officer commanding in the sounds remained at Newbern, and left the most important position, Plymouth, with but four veslitary posts at other points. Major-General Peck, commanding at Newbern, writes to General Butler as follows: Headquarters, Army of The District of North Carolina, Newbern, N. C., April 20th, 1864. General: * * * * * The enemy have appeared in force in front of Plymouth,pture of Plymouth, the Confederates early in May made an attack on Newbern, drove in the pickets, and took possession of the railroad; but thBombshell, laden with troops, and doubtless bound to the attack of Newbern. The Trumpeter was sent back to give tidings of the approach ofreventing her from doing further mischief. Her intended attack on Newbern, in co-operation with the Confederate land forces, was given up, a
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
yed on board the Merrimac, from whom interesting information was obtained in regard to that and other Confederate vessels. Signal stations were destroyed, their operators captured, and instruments brought away. In these expeditions the gun-boats were constantly exposed to the attacks of Confederate artillery, which was continually on the alert to get a shot at them. So active were the enemy, that, about the middle of July, they constructed a battery mounting 20-pounder Sawyer guns on Malvern Hill, and for a time interrupted the navigation of the James River. The Confederates were, in fact, untiring in their efforts to make the Federal troops and gun-boats uncomfortable. On the 28th of July the enemy commenced the erection of batteries at Four Mile Creek, where they had assembled a large force for the purpose of covering the men at work in the trenches, and making a demonstration against General Foster's front. The gun-boats were brought into requisition. and the Agawam, Comm
Deep Bottom (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
nches, and making a demonstration against General Foster's front. The gun-boats were brought into requisition. and the Agawam, Commander A. C. Rhind, and the Mendota, Commander E. T. Nichols, shelled the enemy's works for some time, rendering very effective service in connection with General Hancock's military operations. The following night, in view of the military movements ordered by General Grant, all the troops, except General Foster's original command, were ordered to move from Deep Bottom, under cover of the gun-boats. Here, again, General Grant had an opportunity of utilizing the Navy. As an instance of the activity of the Confederates in presence of the strong forces of the Federals, which almost enveloped them, on August 3d they established a 6-gun rifled 12-pounder battery at Wilcox's Wharf, and opened fire on passing transports. The firing being heard on board the Miami, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant G. W. Graves, that vessel pushed ahead and engaged the battery, w
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
. General Grant on necessity of retaining iron-clads on James River. expedition under Lieutenant-Commander Flusser to Windsn Hill, and for a time interrupted the navigation of the James River. The Confederates were, in fact, untiring in their efng business. The gun-boats now so rigidly patrolled the James River that they were in close proximity to all transports passe from below Howlett's Battery to the upper reach of the James River. This scheme was not favorably regarded by army engineewe have detailed above, the Federal naval vessels in the James River, under the immediate command of Captain Melancton Smith,dispense with some of the iron-clads, on the ground that James River was effectually blocked against the Confederate squadronuch vessels, in my judgment, should be kept in the upper James River. They stand a constant threat to the enemy and prevent the water, although we should probably destroy his whole James River navy, such damage would be done our shipping and stores,
Windsor, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
eet and batteries. Manoeuvres of Generals Grant, Sherman and Butler, and of Confederate armies. speech of Jefferson Davis. General Grant on necessity of retaining iron-clads on James River. expedition under Lieutenant-Commander Flusser to Windsor, N. C. attack on Plymouth, N. C. Confederate ram Albemarle attacks Southfield and Miami. the Southfield sunk. death of Lieutenant-Commander Flusser. capture of Plymouth by Confederates. communication of Secretary Welles on loss of Plymouth. Gollows: Yesterday morning engaged the enemy with a force of two hundred men and a rifled field piece. After a fight of two hours, in which we engaged twelve hundred men of the enemy and three pieces of artillery, the Yankees were driven from Windsor, N. C., to their boats. We lost six men; loss of the enemy not known. Lieutenant-Commander C. W. Flusser, indignant at such a report, in a communication to Acting-Rear-Admiral Lee, writes as follows: The report is false from beginning to co
Alfred Everson (search for this): chapter 41
Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistants,W. T. Worrell and W. S. Sillman; Acting-Third-Assistants, Erastus Barry, John Ross, A. L. Churchill and George Foster. Steamer General Putnam. Acting-Master, H. H. Savage; Acting-Ensigns, Wm. Jennings and H. R. Fowle; Acting-Master's Mates, W. F. Gregg, J. H. Gilley and B. H. Spear; Engineers : Acting-Second-Assistant, J. Henry; Acting-Third-Assistants, A. F. Rockefeller and Wm P. Higgins. Steamer Victoria. Acting Masters, Chas. W. Lee and Alfred Everson; Acting-Ensign, Paul Borner; Acting-Master's Mates, B. W. Tucker and Wm. Moody; Acting-Assistant-Surgeon, John G. Park; Acting-Assistant-Paymaster, Samuel Thomas; Acting-Third-Assistant Engineer, John Haversfield. Steamer Hunchback. Acting-Master, Robert G. Lee; Acting-Ensign, E. K. Valentine; Acting-Master's Mattes, John Maddock and J. F. Sias; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Henry Cushing; Acting-Second-Assistant Engineer, M. Smith. Steamer Shawsheen. Acting-Master, Henry A. Ph
G. W. Farrer (search for this): chapter 41
and J. M. C. Reville; Acting-Master's Mates, Charles Hall. E. P. Blayne, E. S. D. Howland, John Williams and Thos. Stanfield; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Alex. McCausland; Acting-Second-Assistant, David McArthur; Acting-Third-Assistants, James Campbell, John Quinn and Win. McGrath; Gunner, Wm. Mowbry. Steamer Quaker City. Commander, James M. Frailey; Lieutenant, Silas Casey, Jr.; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, J. J. Brownlee; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, H. J. Bullay; Acting-Chief-Engineer, G. W. Farrer; Acting Master, Edmund Kemble; Acting-Ensigns, C. J. Hill, E. M. Seaver and Richard Wilkinson; Acting-Master's Mates, G. C. Sanborn, J. B. Tew; C. H. Thorne and J. C. Constant; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistants, W. J. Howard and J. K. Hickey; Acting-Third-Assistants, J. H. Mathews, J. R. Peterson, E. Prest, E. E. Porter and Fred'k Fries; Acting Gunner, Joseph Furlong. Ordnance store-ship St. Lawrence. Commander, Dominick Lynch; Acting-Master, E. S. Goodwin; Acting-Ensigns, Robert
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