hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 898 0 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 776 2 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes 707 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 694 0 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 676 8 Browse Search
Alexander M. Grant 635 1 Browse Search
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) 452 6 Browse Search
David D. Porter 385 63 Browse Search
Thomas W. Sherman 383 7 Browse Search
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) 338 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,372 total hits in 158 results.

... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
W. J. Shaw (search for this): chapter 43
line was under the immediate command of Colonel W. J. Shaw, 14th Iowa Infantry, commanding 2d Briga without expense to the Government. Here Colonel Shaw luxuriated with his brigade on the plantatible distance and was in some confusion. Colonel W. J. Shaw, commanding the 14th Iowa infantry, 16tha reception as ever befel such a movement. Colonel Shaw ordered his men to reserve their fire untilnemy's infantry advanced across the open field, Shaw's brigade opened on them at a distance of 200 yto nearly outflank the brigades of Benedict and Shaw, driving Benedict's right into the gap and inflicting severe loss. Benedict was killed, and Shaw lost 500 men. For a short time these brigades the enemy's artillery that commenced firing on Shaw's brigade at the beginning. The Federal troolt great sympathy for their old friends. Colonel Shaw urged General Smith to allow him to go to t,000 infantry; the latter under the gallant Colonel Shaw, and they soon cleared the river banks of a
David D. Porter (search for this): chapter 43
. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. The origin, objects and pd Port Hudson, General Sherman proposed to Admiral Porter an expedition to Shreveport, La., via Red arge force into the interior of Louisiana, Admiral Porter determined there should be no want of floa of the Federal forces. The Black Hawk, Admiral Porter's flag-ship. Fortunately, as matters tnity. General Banks had been writing to Admiral Porter up to the latter part of February, 1864, this expedition regardless of consequences, Admiral Porter resolved to do every thing in his power toboats. The fleet of gun-boats, under Rear-Admiral Porter, starting out, followed by the army trahe enemy's forces in this region, he urged Admiral Porter to push on at once with the force they the Banks' flag-ship, was of the same name as Admiral Porter's flag-ship, an unpleasant circumstance, sdition wiser and poorer men. As long as Admiral Porter had been associated with Generals Grant an[2 more...]
Kilby Smith (search for this): chapter 43
e wary. It was then agreed upon between General Smith and the Admiral to land the artillery at ong him that he was falling back, and directing Smith to return at once to Grand Ecore and report. end operations in that quarter, leaving General Kilby Smith and some of his transports behind, undeer Selfridge's written report at the time, General Smith merely making the Admiral a verbal report Green, who had his head blown off. General Kilby Smith says, on offering Admiral Porter's letto see what was the matter. He soon met General Kilby Smith coming down, and knowing that Selfridgened to his original position, directing General Kilby Smith to form his transports in order at oncegun-boats Osage and Lexington, to which General Kilby Smith gives in his report the following faintre as soon as they could get afloat. General Kilby Smith now communicated with the Admiral, and thstanding the five hours fire to which General Kilby Smith says they were exposed. The vessels [19 more...]
Thomas Rice (search for this): chapter 43
ins for supplies, marched more than three hundred miles over the worst roads possible, with an active enemy harassing them at every step. Their difficulties, indeed, were far too numerous to mention in this short sketch. Whenever Steele was attacked, he defeated the enemy; and the only mistake he appears to have made was in sending back an empty wagon-train to be captured instead of retaining it with the army. General Steele was a soldier who knew his business, and he was supported by Generals Rice, Solomon, Carr, and Thayer, who inspired their men with their own martial spirit. They outwitted the Confederates as well as outfought them on every occasion; and we only regret that the dispatches sent off by General Banks in a gun-boat did not reach General Steele in time to save the large wagon-train captured by the enemy. But to return to affairs on Red River. When it was found that Banks would probably retreat to Alexandria, the Admiral got the Eastport and other large vessels
ton they could find. The very deliberate movements of the Army gave color to these reports, and the large number of empty steam transports strengthened the idea that it was intended to load them with cotton. Besides these, there were seven or eight hundred army wagons, ostensibly to carry rations for General Banks' division, while A. J. Smith had hardly any wagons. Anticipating the wants of the Army, the Navy brought along with them two of the large barges built some time before by General Fremont to use in making a bridge. These were turned over to the military authorities at Grand Ecore. The second day after the arrival of the expedition, Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, of the Eastport, reported to the Admiral that these two barges, which would hold three or four hundred bales each, and another barge belonging to Butler and Casey, were being filled with cotton, under superintendence of an officer of General Banks' staff, the cotton being hauled to the bank by army wagons. Lieut
George S. Benedict (search for this): chapter 43
ile fighting continued on the Federal left, which fell back so far as to allow the Confederates to pass almost to its rear and to nearly outflank the brigades of Benedict and Shaw, driving Benedict's right into the gap and inflicting severe loss. Benedict was killed, and Shaw lost 500 men. For a short time these brigades were Benedict's right into the gap and inflicting severe loss. Benedict was killed, and Shaw lost 500 men. For a short time these brigades were almost in the hands of the enemy, who had pushed far in their rear. Had he been bold enough to overwhelm the Federal forces with his masses, which were steadily pressing on, he could have done so. Much of the fighting, where the Federal troops were stationed, was in the midst of a thick undergrowth, where the commanding officeBenedict was killed, and Shaw lost 500 men. For a short time these brigades were almost in the hands of the enemy, who had pushed far in their rear. Had he been bold enough to overwhelm the Federal forces with his masses, which were steadily pressing on, he could have done so. Much of the fighting, where the Federal troops were stationed, was in the midst of a thick undergrowth, where the commanding officers could hardly see what was going on. At one time part of the troops were between two bodies of the enemy, and, with the latter in their rear, found it better to hold their position than to attempt a retreat. General Emory, in his official report, says: The enemy emerged from the woods in all directions and in heavy columns, c
Sterling Price (search for this): chapter 43
ed the Little Red River on a bridge constructed by the soldiers. On the 10th of April the army moved to Prairie, where Price, the Confederate General, had determined to make a final stand at the point he had chosen; two branches diverge from the Confederates had learned that Banks had retreated to stay, and General Kirby Smith with 8,000 Confederates had joined General Price, and the combined forces were marching upon Steele's position. Under all the circumstances, with no hope of being jod a large force of infantry, was moving up the river to attack Little Rock. The combined forces of Confederates, under Price, made the attack, and were repulsed with great slaughter, losing a large part of their artillery and munitions of war. Steele held on for a few days longer to see if Price would make another attack, and then took up his line of march and joined the Army of the Tennessee. It does not require much military knowledge to see how much better Steele's expedition was mana
H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 43
anks until long after the expedition failed. A question has been standing for many years as to who originated it, and this has been settled by the highest authority. General Grant, in his Memoirs, says that the expedition originated with General Halleck, who urged General Banks, with all his authority, to undertake it. This is, without doubt, the origin of the affair. After the fall of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, General Sherman proposed to Admiral Porter an expedition to Shreveport, La.,t energetic manner. And now, finding that Banks was determined to start on this expedition regardless of consequences, Admiral Porter resolved to do every thing in his power to assist his military operations. To make his success certain, General Halleck had determined to send an army into Arkansas under General Steele. This force reached Little Rock early in March, and, after providing themselves with stores and munitions of war. departed from that place on the 24th. and, after a hard mar
Thomas S. Phelps (search for this): chapter 43
t up two pump-boats, with orders to Lieutenant-Commander Phelps to take out everything that would l explosion than had been imagined. Lieutenant-Commander Phelps and his officers worked with a will energy and determination were never evinced. Phelps was satisfied, if time were allowed, that the l, during which time the efforts of Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, and the officers and men of that ld to the saving of this valuable iron-clad. Phelps and his command worked day and night, almost w he acceded to the proposition to destroy her. Phelps had got the Eastport sixty miles down the rive following extract of a letter from Lieutenant-Commander Phelps will be interesting in this connectshort distance to witness the explosion, while Phelps, from his boat alongside, applied the match, aof shedding Northern blood. When Lieutenant-Commander Phelps saw the difficulties ahead, he stea killed and wounded, and was very much cut up. Phelps concluded it would be best to wait till night [3 more...]
Alexander M. Grant (search for this): chapter 43
long after the expedition failed. A question has been standing for many years as to who originated it, and this has been settled by the highest authority. General Grant, in his Memoirs, says that the expedition originated with General Halleck, who urged General Banks, with all his authority, to undertake it. This is, without dthe Navy at Alexandria, and the conclusion arrived at was that the General did not possess the military virtue of punctuality which the Navy had recognized in Generals Grant, Sherman, A. J. Smith, and other officers with whom they had hitherto cooperated. As soon as the Admiral reached Alexandria, he commenced getting the vesseto trade — their cotton was taken from them, and they returned from the expedition wiser and poorer men. As long as Admiral Porter had been associated with Generals Grant and Sherman in the midst of intricate and embarrassing operations, he had never to complain of the least want of courtesy on their part, and never had the sli
... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16