hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 898 0 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 776 2 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes 707 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 694 0 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 676 8 Browse Search
Alexander M. Grant 635 1 Browse Search
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) 452 6 Browse Search
David D. Porter 385 63 Browse Search
Thomas W. Sherman 383 7 Browse Search
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) 338 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,372 total hits in 158 results.

... 11 12 13 14 15 16
ecognized in Generals Grant, Sherman, A. J. Smith, and other officers with whom they had hitherto cooperated. As soon as the Admiral reached Alexandria, he commenced getting the vessels above the Falls, although the water was falling in the river at the rate of an inch a day, and the larger vessels had not more than six inches to spare. He trusted to good fortune to get the vessels down again, or to that great rise in the water which General Banks had been informed would certainly come in May or June. General Banks had apparently come into the Red River country intending to stay, for he was provided with everything necessary to maintain a large army. Transports with provisions, clothing and munitions of war were daily arriving, and large buildings in Alexandria converted into store-houses were rapidly filled up. By the 29th of March, the Admiral had all his vessels over the Falls, except the Eastport, a long, heavy iron-clad, which detained the fleet two days. As soon as sh
oldiers, had taken 150 wagons, all the stores, and 22 pieces of artillery. How all this was done can only be understood by examining Banks' line of march, which, it appears, was also his line of battle. It seems the further Banks' army advanced into the country the deeper became the gullies and the worse became the roads, while the thick woods on all sides afforded a fine shelter for the enemy. Up to the 8th of April it had rained heavily. General Franklin, who left Grand Ecore on the 6th, marched but seventeen miles on that and eighteen miles on the succeeding day, being much impeded by his large wagon train; and it seems General Lee was so far in advance that he could not rely on the whole of Franklin's force for support, as should have been the case. On the 7th, Lee's force had a severe skirmish with the enemy beyond Pleasant Hill, and, after some delay, a brigade of Franklin's infantry was sent to his assistance. Lee's cavalry were nothing more than infantry soldiers who
Banks to lend him 10,000 men, under the command of General A. J. Smith, whom he felt sure would cooperate with the Navy in the most energetic manner. And now, finding that Banks was determined to start on this expedition regardless of consequences, Admiral Porter resolved to do every thing in his power to assist his military operations. To make his success certain, General Halleck had determined to send an army into Arkansas under General Steele. This force reached Little Rock early in March, and, after providing themselves with stores and munitions of war. departed from that place on the 24th. and, after a hard march, arrived at Arkadelphia. March 29th, where, for the present. we will leave them. General Banks had informed the Admiral that he would march an army of 36,000 men to Alexandria, La.. and would meet him at that place on the 17th of March. On the 10th of March the naval vessels had assembled at the mouth of Red River, and, on the 11th, General A. J. Smith arri
March 10th (search for this): chapter 43
d determined to send an army into Arkansas under General Steele. This force reached Little Rock early in March, and, after providing themselves with stores and munitions of war. departed from that place on the 24th. and, after a hard march, arrived at Arkadelphia. March 29th, where, for the present. we will leave them. General Banks had informed the Admiral that he would march an army of 36,000 men to Alexandria, La.. and would meet him at that place on the 17th of March. On the 10th of March the naval vessels had assembled at the mouth of Red River, and, on the 11th, General A. J. Smith arrived with 10,000 excellent soldiers in transports. After inspecting the forces on shore, the Army and Navy moved up the river on the 12th, the fleet of gun-boats followed by the Army transports. As the largest vessels could barely pass the bar at the mouth of Red River, owing to the low stage of water, the Admiral could not cherish any very favorable hopes for the future; but the party w
March 17th (search for this): chapter 43
ain, General Halleck had determined to send an army into Arkansas under General Steele. This force reached Little Rock early in March, and, after providing themselves with stores and munitions of war. departed from that place on the 24th. and, after a hard march, arrived at Arkadelphia. March 29th, where, for the present. we will leave them. General Banks had informed the Admiral that he would march an army of 36,000 men to Alexandria, La.. and would meet him at that place on the 17th of March. On the 10th of March the naval vessels had assembled at the mouth of Red River, and, on the 11th, General A. J. Smith arrived with 10,000 excellent soldiers in transports. After inspecting the forces on shore, the Army and Navy moved up the river on the 12th, the fleet of gun-boats followed by the Army transports. As the largest vessels could barely pass the bar at the mouth of Red River, owing to the low stage of water, the Admiral could not cherish any very favorable hopes for the
March 18th (search for this): chapter 43
urged that it would be very discourteous to General Smith to go forward without consulting him, and leave him, with only 5,000 men, unprotected by the gun-boats. Desperate as this scheme of Mower's appeared, we think it would have succeeded better than General Banks' movement on Shreveport a short time afterwards. General Taylor had occupied Alexandria with 15,000 men, and had hurriedly decamped on the approach of the Army and Navy, leaving three pieces of artillery behind. On the 18th of March, General A. J. Smith arrived, ready to march at a moment's notice when Banks should give the order. Meanwhile, there was no news whatever of General Banks' whereabouts. His cavalry arrived on the 19th, and on the 25th, eight days after he had agreed to meet the Admiral at Alexandria, he appeared upon the scene. Then commenced a series of delays, which culminated in disasters, that have left a reproach upon the Red River expedition which time cannot efface; for, no matter how gallant t
March 12th (search for this): chapter 43
, Chillicothe, Louisville, Mound City, Carondelet, Ouichita, Pittsburg, and Gazelle, followed by the troops in transports; while the rest of the gun-boats pushed on up Red River, with instructions to remove the obstructions, but not to attack Fort De Russy until the flagship's arrival, or until General Smith's troops came in sight. The enemy had at this place some 5,000 men, and the only chance of capturing them was by a combined movement of the Army and Navy. At about noon, on the 12th of March, the Federal forces arrived at Simmsport, and found the enemy posted in force some three miles back of that place. The commanding officer of the Benton, Lieutenant-Commander James A. Greer, was ordered to land his crew and drive in the enemy's pickets; and, General Smith's transports coming up, the troops landed and took possession of the Confederate camp, the enemy retreating towards Fort De Russy. That night General Smith concluded to follow the enemy by land, while the Admiral agr
March 15th (search for this): chapter 43
s soon as the army should reach the fort, in order to seize any steamers that might be lying there with steam down. Owing to obstructions in the river, the dispatch-boat carrying the message was delayed five hours, and Phelps reached Alexandria just thirty minutes too late, the swiftest of the naval vessels arriving just in time to see six steamers escaping up the Falls. One of them, the Countess, having grounded, was burned by the enemy. The fleet had thus reached Alexandria on the 15th of March. two days earlier than had been promised General Banks. On the day following, there were nine gun-boats lying off the town, and one hundred and eighty sailors were landed, to occupy the place and take possession of any Confederate Government property that might be stored there. The inhabitants were respectfully treated, and everything was as quiet as a New England village. General Smith remained behind a few days to destroy the formidable works which he had captured, and a gun-boat
... 11 12 13 14 15 16