hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 898 0 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 776 2 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes 707 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 694 0 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 676 8 Browse Search
Alexander M. Grant 635 1 Browse Search
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) 452 6 Browse Search
David D. Porter 385 63 Browse Search
Thomas W. Sherman 383 7 Browse Search
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) 338 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,372 total hits in 158 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
bit of witnessing that it created bad feeling at once — this extended not only to the Navy but to the corps of General A. J. Smith as well. When Smith joined the expedition he had just finished a long march through the interior of the Confederacy, and his men were without proper clothing and other necessaries, and made a poor figure beside Banks' well-equipped troops; but when it came to actual warfare, they were famous fighters. They were men who had lain for months in the trenches at Vicksburg, had gone through the hardships of Chickasaw Bayou, had helped win Arkansas Post, etc., etc.; yet when Banks first saw these veterans, he exclaimed, What, in the name of Heaven, did Sherman send me these ragged guerillas for? At Mansfield he found these ragged guerillas saved the day and the honor of his army! We have no doubt that when Banks saw his fine army under General Franklin, and was told how easily those troops had put the Confederates along the route to flight, he felt that h
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
eet proceeded at the rate of a mile or two an hour, until they arrived at Conchatta Chute on the 11th, where General Kilby Smith received dispatches from Banks, notifying him that he was falling back, and directing Smith to return at once to Grand Ecore and report. General Banks did not pay the Admiral the courtesy of informing him what had happened, although he must have known that the Navy was guarding his transports, and that they could not well proceed without its aid. Before leaving Springfield, a letter, dropped by a Confederate scout, was picked up, informing General Dick Taylor that the transports had from six to ten thousand soldiers on board, and were accompanied by four gun-boats, this force being for the purpose of flanking him. This idea of the enemy stood the expedition in good stead, for, perhaps, had Taylor known there were only 1,800 effective soldiers, the transports would have been attacked sooner than they were. On the way up the river, the fleet had met wit
Chickasaw Bayou (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
once — this extended not only to the Navy but to the corps of General A. J. Smith as well. When Smith joined the expedition he had just finished a long march through the interior of the Confederacy, and his men were without proper clothing and other necessaries, and made a poor figure beside Banks' well-equipped troops; but when it came to actual warfare, they were famous fighters. They were men who had lain for months in the trenches at Vicksburg, had gone through the hardships of Chickasaw Bayou, had helped win Arkansas Post, etc., etc.; yet when Banks first saw these veterans, he exclaimed, What, in the name of Heaven, did Sherman send me these ragged guerillas for? At Mansfield he found these ragged guerillas saved the day and the honor of his army! We have no doubt that when Banks saw his fine army under General Franklin, and was told how easily those troops had put the Confederates along the route to flight, he felt that he could do very well without the corps of A. J.
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
tory that would have enabled them to hold that part of Louisiana until the end of the war, and to plant the Union flag in Texas--the latter a cherished object of the Government. The plan of invasion was a wild one, it is true, but it came nearer one file was swept away, another took its place. The commanding officer of the Confederates, General Thomas Green, of Texas, who had served at San Jacinto and in the Mexican war, mounted on a fine horse, led his troops up to the bank, and encour cared for. These men informed Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge that the party who had attacked him were new regiments from Texas; that they had been led to believe that the gun-boats could easily be captured, and that General Green encouraged them so, and at this moment the enemy, with a brigade about 2,000 strong, under the immediate command of General Thos. Green, of Texas, with a 4 gun battery, formed upon the bank, and put their pieces in battery within point-blank range of the Hastings, th
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 43
ll into a trap, as the Confederates could concentrate all their forces against him and perhaps defeat his army. Banks' army was over a hundred miles in a direct line from Steele, as the crow flies, and twice that distance by the crooked roads and rivers, all the intermediate country swarming with Confederate troops. As it was hardly possible to communicate with Steele in any other manner, the General proposed sending one of the fast naval dispatch steamers down the Red River, up the Mississippi and Arkansas Rivers, thence via Little Rock to Camden, Arkansas, a distance of over five hundred miles. A messenger was sent accordingly, but whether he got to his destination is not known. Nothing could better demonstrate the absurdity of this co-operative movement upon Shreveport than the fact, that at no time since the expedition started had the commanders of the two armies communicated with each other. A glance at the map will show that from the first these armies were to advance
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
e vessel, and felt sure that the Eastport would soon be afloat again. He was detained a day in Alexandria, making a new disposition of the naval forces on the Mississippi and its tributaries. During his absence up Red River the massacre at Fort Pillow had occurred, in consequence of the policy pursued of not properly garrisoning the strong points, where so much blood and treasure had been expended. There were two small gun-boats at Fort Pillow at the time, which did their part, but the gFort Pillow at the time, which did their part, but the garrison could make but feeble resistance. The Essex, Benton, Choctaw, Lafayette, Ouchita, and Avenger were sent to secure the fort against further attacks. The Eastport was much more shattered by the explosion than had been imagined. Lieutenant-Commander Phelps and his officers worked with a will to save this valuable vessel, and more energy and determination were never evinced. Phelps was satisfied, if time were allowed, that the Eastport would be floated off all right. As the Admiral h
Natchitoches (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
given several passes to get cotton from the Red River country, but it had been seized by the gun-b officer of the gun-boat at the mouth of the Red River was directed to seize the vessel and send hean arrangement that the General should go up Red River with a force before which the Confederates wre, where they disembarked, and encamped at Natchitoches, near by. No opposition had thus far been m 3,500 men, under General Lee, marched from Nachitoches. General A. J. Smith followed on the 7th wthat night the vessels moved slowly down the Red River, and at 10 o'clock a courier from General Ba had practically possession of both banks of Red River, the rebels hardly molested us during the re, rendering me essential service. (!) The Red River expedition was emphatically a united serviceby the enemy. But to return to affairs on Red River. When it was found that Banks would probabltion near Mansfield, one on each side of the Red River, and the Confederates would have retreated t[13 more...]
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
South, which Sherman afterwards so successfully accomplished without Banks' assistance. By looking at the map, it will be readily seen how valuable a position Mobile would have been at such a time if held by the Union troops, its railroad system connecting with all the Southern roads, by which Sherman could have been supplied , while the straggling forces of the enemy between him and the Gulf would have been cut off. It would strike the military observer that to insure complete success Mobile should have been captured at the time Sherman started on his raid, which would have placed the entire country between him and the sea at the disposal of the Federh he passed. At the time Sherman went to New Orleans to see General Banks, the latter had under his command at least 50,000 men, and could have easily captured Mobile, then garrisoned by only about 10,000 troops; but this place, so easy of access and so easily captured from the land side, was left unnoticed until the latter par
San Jacinto (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
examined the vessel the day after, and there was not a place six inches square not perforated by a bullet. The Osage secured a good position abreast of the main body of the enemy, and poured in grape, canister, and shrapnel from her 11-inch guns, mowing the enemy down by the dozen at every fire. The latter seemed to know no fear; as fast as one file was swept away, another took its place. The commanding officer of the Confederates, General Thomas Green, of Texas, who had served at San Jacinto and in the Mexican war, mounted on a fine horse, led his troops up to the bank, and encouraged them to pour in their fire, which they did incessantly, never less than 2,500 muskets firing at once upon the Osage. The wood-work of the latter was cut to pieces, but the danger from bullets passing through the iron was very little. While this was going on, the Lexington enfiladed the enemy with shell from her 8-inch guns, disabling the entire gun-battery. The fight had continued nearly an
Columbia, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
ficulty of obtaining supplies. Hence it was impossible for them to move in harmony as regards time, and next to impossible for one to notify the other of any detention that might occur. The whole idea was in violation of the rule of war that two armies co-operating with each other should be in constant communication. This co-operation might easily have been effected if Steele had marched to Columbia, La., through a much better country than the one he passed through. On arriving at Columbia, he would have been within eighty miles of General Banks, and could have been supplied with stores by way of the Washita River, where the gun-boats could have protected his transports and added to the strength of his artillery. The two armies could have been put in communication near Mansfield, one on each side of the Red River, and the Confederates would have retreated to Shreveport without resistance. As it was, the enemy had the opportunity of attacking each army in detail, and tur
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...