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Thomas Kilby Smith (search for this): chapter 43
and 19th army corps, under Franklin and Emory, and a cavalry division of about 3,500 men, under General Lee, marched from Nachitoches. General A. J. Smith followed on the 7th with his division of the 16th corps, excepting 2,500 men under General T. Kilby Smith, who had been sent to escort the transports carrying supplies. When the fleet started, there were about thirty of these transports in company, but their numbers were afterwards increased by the addition of some large empty steamers, whic in waiting joining the village on the left — just such a place as a general would like to select on such an occasion. General A. J. Smith's reserves at this time, owing to absentees and the 2,500 men with the fleet of transports under General T. Kilby Smith, amounted to only 5,800 men, under the immediate command of General Mower. When the division appeared upon the field under Mower, the army had been forced back a considerable distance and was in some confusion. Colonel W. J. Shaw, comma
Thomas W. Sherman (search for this): chapter 43
er the fall of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, General Sherman proposed to Admiral Porter an expedition f disaster. The Admiral had written to General Sherman that he did not think the time propitious and when he arrived in Natchez he found that Sherman had gone to New Orleans to see General Banks.on in the great raid through the South, which Sherman afterwards so successfully accomplished witho. Fortunately, as matters turned out, General Sherman was able to overcome all obstacles that iy. The Admiral therefore determined that, if Sherman gave up the enterprise, he would co-operate wll his energies to extricate himself. When Sherman returned from New Orleans, he informed the Adr had been associated with Generals Grant and Sherman in the midst of intricate and embarrassing ope exclaimed, What, in the name of Heaven, did Sherman send me these ragged guerillas for? At MansfSmith, when allowed, with his command, by General Sherman, to take part in this expedition, was ord[3 more...]
rmined to send an army into Arkansas under General Steele. This force reached Little Rock early in p on the 16th inst. We must now turn to General Steele's movements. On the 1st of April, Generalcomplished. General Thayer had not yet joined Steele, having been delayed by bad roads, for the heainst any force the enemy could bring to bear. Steele was now only a hundred miles from Shreveport, the enemy, the first disaster occurring during Steele's long march through a difficult country swarm part of their artillery and munitions of war. Steele held on for a few days longer to see if Price 's expedition was managed than that of Banks'. Steele's army, unaccompanied by transports and depended instead of retaining it with the army. General Steele was a soldier who knew his business, and h General Banks in a gun-boat did not reach General Steele in time to save the large wagon-train captwas over a hundred miles in a direct line from Steele, as the crow flies, and twice that distance by[16 more...]
D. E. Taylor (search for this): chapter 43
on Shreveport a short time afterwards. General Taylor had occupied Alexandria with 15,000 men, are was no reason to entertain much fear of General Taylor and his troops, already greatly demoralized by the Union success so far. If Taylor could not, with 15,000 men and heavy fortifications, holred men, apparently as much demoralized as General Taylor and his army of 15,000. The Federal forll in with a courier bearing dispatches to General Taylor, who was encamped some nine miles in the r00 men would be long delayed by the 16,000 General Taylor had at that time between them and Shrevepoattack from the 15,000 or 20,000 men under General Taylor, who might not know of the arrangements ofon the results of a victory. As soon as General Taylor heard of Banks' retreat, he issued a generl of that exaggeration which characterized General Taylor, perhaps it was natural under the circumstaving beaten him. The facts, however, are that Taylor was some miles distant from the battle-field a
George M. Bache (search for this): chapter 43
of the iron-clad Osage, Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge, and the Lexington, Lieutenant Bache. As circumstances occurred at this time of which we wish to be the impasage had got aground just above a turn, the Lexington was not far off, and Lieutenant Bache was visiting the Osage. All the transports, with one exception, had pas Union soldiers. but he soon discovered their true character, and ordered Lieutenant Bache to drop down the river, in the Lexington, a short distance, to enfilade thergy on this occasion, would have given no end of trouble had he lived. Lieutenant Bache managed the Lexington beautifully, and did great execution with the 8-inch necessarily passed down, as my position was in the rear. Seeing my situation, Bache, of the Lexington, which had stopped near by, came on board. We had been for semies. I accordingly descended, made all preparations for battle, and directed Bache to go below with the Lexington, and take up an enfilading position. Then com
lies, marched more than three hundred miles over the worst roads possible, with an active enemy harassing them at every step. Their difficulties, indeed, were far too numerous to mention in this short sketch. Whenever Steele was attacked, he defeated the enemy; and the only mistake he appears to have made was in sending back an empty wagon-train to be captured instead of retaining it with the army. General Steele was a soldier who knew his business, and he was supported by Generals Rice, Solomon, Carr, and Thayer, who inspired their men with their own martial spirit. They outwitted the Confederates as well as outfought them on every occasion; and we only regret that the dispatches sent off by General Banks in a gun-boat did not reach General Steele in time to save the large wagon-train captured by the enemy. But to return to affairs on Red River. When it was found that Banks would probably retreat to Alexandria, the Admiral got the Eastport and other large vessels over the bar
stacles that impeded his progress, and to subsist his army on the country through which he passed. At the time Sherman went to New Orleans to see General Banks, the latter had under his command at least 50,000 men, and could have easily captured Mobile, then garrisoned by only about 10,000 troops; but this place, so easy of access and so easily captured from the land side, was left unnoticed until the latter part of the war. Its capture was then undertaken by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. The result was the loss of several vessels blown up by torpedoes, which the Confederates were able to lay down with impunity. General Banks had been writing to Admiral Porter up to the latter part of February, 1864, to co-operate with him in an advance into the Red River region, and in his answers the Admiral had tried to impress on the General the impropriety of such a movement at the then low stage of water, recommending him to wait until there was a prospect of a rise. The Gen
W. J. Landrum (search for this): chapter 43
front by Banks, his main body of some 6,000 men were seven miles in the rear, and fifteen miles back there were 8,000 more; while we know that, when Lee first called for support, the enemy had in position 8,000 infantry, with some artillery, and nobody could tell how many more in the background. That the Federal soldiers did all that men could do in this first engagement, no one can deny; but if Banks had tried to place impediments in their way he could not have succeeded better. Colonel W. J. Landrum, commanding 4th brigade of Ransom's division, in a report to that officer, says: My men have skirmished and marched through bushes and thickets for eight or nine miles, making in all a march of sixteen miles; they have no water, and are literally worn out. Can you have them relieved soon? General Lee insists on pushing ahead. When General Ransom arrived on the field he found the road obstructed by the cavalry train, and, after a great deal of trouble, got through and arrived at t
must now turn to General Steele's movements. On the 1st of April, General Steele's army, which was intended to co-operate with Banks, was at Arkadelphia, waiting for General Thayer to join it. The same day, the army moved fourteen miles to Campte, and thence to Washington. Near the latter place it encountered the Confederate Generals, Marmaduke and Cabell, with a good-sized force, and, after considerable manoeuvring, Steele, while turning his army southward, was attacked in the rear by General Shelby near the crossing of the river. The enemy, although attacking with great bravery, were repulsed with heavy loss. On the 3d of April, Steele's entire command crossed the Little Red River at Elkins' Ferry — a movement so skillfully planned and so promptly executed that the enemy only by accident learned of it after it was accomplished. General Thayer had not yet joined Steele, having been delayed by bad roads, for the heavy rains made terrible work for the army, causing the route to b
Henry K. Thatcher (search for this): chapter 43
ble to overcome all obstacles that impeded his progress, and to subsist his army on the country through which he passed. At the time Sherman went to New Orleans to see General Banks, the latter had under his command at least 50,000 men, and could have easily captured Mobile, then garrisoned by only about 10,000 troops; but this place, so easy of access and so easily captured from the land side, was left unnoticed until the latter part of the war. Its capture was then undertaken by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. The result was the loss of several vessels blown up by torpedoes, which the Confederates were able to lay down with impunity. General Banks had been writing to Admiral Porter up to the latter part of February, 1864, to co-operate with him in an advance into the Red River region, and in his answers the Admiral had tried to impress on the General the impropriety of such a movement at the then low stage of water, recommending him to wait until there was a prospect
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