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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
they really believed all through the Southwest that they had gained a brilliant victory, when the truth was simply that the Federal General did not hold on to the victory which his troops had won. Great rejoicing was also kept up in the South in consequence of the success of the Albemarle and the capture of Plymouth. Many were made to believe that a new and favorable turn had been given to their affairs, and that if the opportunity was followed up it would lead to further successes in Louisiana. A pressure was brought to bear on Admiral Buchanan to expedite the completion of the iron-clad Tennessee, with the expectation that this vessel would demolish Farragut and his fleet, proceed to New Orleans, capture the Union fleet at that place, prevent Banks from reaching the city again, and finally restore the Confederate authority! This may seem a wild scheme, but it might have been successful. Buchanan was a brave and energetic officer, capable of undertaking any enterprise, and
Buras (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
rcoming the rebel fleet, I had the satisfaction to receive this day. Some preliminary account of your operations had previously reached us through rebel channels. Again, it is my pleasure and my duty to congratulate you and your brave associates on an achievement unequalled in our service by any other commander, and only surpassed by that unparalleled naval triumph of the squadron under your command in the spring of 1862, when, proceeding up the Mississippi, you passed forts Jackson and St. Philip, and, overcoming all obstructions, captured New Orleans, and restored unobstructed navigation to the commercial emporium of the great central valley of the Union. The Bay of Mobile was not only fortified and guarded by forts and batteries on shore, and by submerged obstructions, but the rebels had also collected there a formidable fleet, commanded by their highest naval officer, a former captain in the Union Navy, who, false to the Government and the Union, had deserted his country in t
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
d pilots were familiar. The people of Mobile felt quite secure against any attempt on the part of the Union gun-boats to pass their defences, and the blockade-runners laid as safely at their wharves as if they had been in the docks of Liverpool. While the forts at the entrance of Mobile Bay remained intact, the Confederates could continue to supply their armies through Mobile City and the numerous railroads running from it to all parts of the South. After the fall of Port Hudson and Vicksburg, General Banks, in New Orleans, had at his disposal over 50,000 troops; and General Grant, at that time having in his mind the idea of sending Sherman on the celebrated march to the sea, had urgently requested the authorities at Washington to Chart showing the fleet, under Admiral Farragut, passing Fort Morgan, and the position of the Confederate forts and vessels; also, chart of Mobile Bay up to the city of Mobile, showing forts and obstructions. send Banks to Mobile with a sufficient
Fort Gaines (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
sance. Confederate iron-clads. forts Morgan, Gaines and Powell and light-house battery. bombardmeworks protected the entrance to Mobile Bay--Forts Gaines and Morgan--the former mounting 21 guns and— the land forces to operate in the rear of forts Gaines and Morgan by the Big Dauphine Island and Md in throwing more troops and supplies into Fort Gaines, all of which were captured. At 5:40 A. an from outside the bar to the eastward. Forts Gaines and Morgan had been-planned and built by thrt Morgan was but the matter of a few days; Fort Gaines could make but a feeble resistance against Fort Morgan, and the rifled guns to bear on Fort Gaines. Report of Lieutenant-Commander C. H. the 6th, the Chickasaw was sent in to shell Fort Gaines, and this was so effectually done that Coloip, where an agreement was signed, by which Fort Gaines was surrendered unconditionally. All privad Mobile Bay, passing between Forts Morgan and Gaines, and encountering and overcoming the rebel fle[8 more...]
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
was the case, he did not take long to make up his mind. The fleet had not been anchored more than fifteen minutes when it was reported to Admiral Farragut that the Tennessee was coming out from under Fort Morgan and standing down for the head of the fleet. Farragut at once divined that it was his enemy's intention to sink the flagship (which would have been glory enough for one day), but he determined to show the Confederates that it was an easier matter to sink a frigate at anchor in Hampton Roads than a live fleet in Mobile Bay. The signal was at once made to get underway, and the crews ran the anchors up to the bows with marvellous rapidity. The iron-clads, and such wooden vessels as had been prepared with iron prows, were ordered to attack the Tennessee at once, before she could reach the centre of the fleet, and the wooden vessels were directed to ram the iron-clad and attempt to disable her in that way. Thus the fleet and the Tennessee were approaching each other rapid
Grant's Pass (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
first, Farragut was wise to delay his attack until the arrival of the iron-clads. In addition to the two forts above mentioned was Fort Powell, situated at Grant's Pass. This could inflict no damage to a fleet passing Morgan and Gaines, but could annoy an enemy after he had passed up as far as the anchoring ground. While wlt on an oyster bank. The Confederate engineers had exhibited great skill in its construction, and it was impervious to shot and shell. It was built to guard Grant's Pass, the entrance from Mississippi Sound to Mobile Bay, and it was very important that it should be well built and armed. A Confederate writer says: Admirieutenant-Colonel Williams (the last man) had left the fort. Farragut's chief motive in making this attack was to get the gun-boats into Mobile Bay through Grant's Pass, and to endeavor to destroy the Tennessee while she had the camels under her in crossing the Dog River bar. From all accounts Buchanan was working energetic
Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
e ships into the bay. He was cool and brave throughout, never losing his self-possession. This man was captured early in the war in a fishing-smack which he owned, and though he protested that he had no interest in the war, and only asked for the privilege of fishing for the fleet, yet his services were too valuable to the captors as a pilot not to be secured. He was appointed a first-class pilot, and has served us with zeal and fidelity, and has lost his vessel, which went to pieces on Ship Island. I commend him to the Department. It gives me pleasure to refer to several officers who volunteered to take any situation where they might be useful, some of whom were on their way North, either by orders of the Department or condemned by medical survey. The reports of the different commanders will show how they conducted themselves. I have already mentioned Lieutenant-Commander Perkins, of the Chickasaw, and Lieutenant Yates, of the Augusta, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant William H
Liverpool (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
ps-of-war could not follow them. The city of Mobile, in consequence, became one of the most important rendezvous for blockade-runners, as it was situated some miles up the bay, and could only be reached through tortuous channels, with which only experienced pilots were familiar. The people of Mobile felt quite secure against any attempt on the part of the Union gun-boats to pass their defences, and the blockade-runners laid as safely at their wharves as if they had been in the docks of Liverpool. While the forts at the entrance of Mobile Bay remained intact, the Confederates could continue to supply their armies through Mobile City and the numerous railroads running from it to all parts of the South. After the fall of Port Hudson and Vicksburg, General Banks, in New Orleans, had at his disposal over 50,000 troops; and General Grant, at that time having in his mind the idea of sending Sherman on the celebrated march to the sea, had urgently requested the authorities at Washin
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
and of the wooden vessels, between them and Fort Morgan, for the double purpose of keeping down thehe obstructions and were beyond the fire of Fort Morgan, but the rain Tennessee was steaming about sealed the fate of Mobile; the surrender of Fort Morgan was but the matter of a few days; Fort Gainion during the engagement of yesterday with Fort Morgan, the rebel gun-boats and the ram: When t action this forenoon with the batteries at Fort Morgan and the rebel rain Tennessee, this ship hastry and good conduct during the action with Fort Morgan and the rebel rain and gun-boats. Feeling f the part this ship took in the passage of Fort Morgan yesterday, I neglected to allude to the efferal order and plan of battle for attacking Fort Morgan and the rebel fleet, Lieutenant-Commander Ben in the water, under as heavy a fire from Fort Morgan as any officer ever went through, found hist Gulf Blockading Squadron, Mobile Bay. Fort Morgan remained yet to be captured, and all the ne[57 more...]
Pensacola (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
see surrenders. incidents of battle. the wounded transferred to Pensacola. names of killed and wounded. Farragut's detailed report of batre of driving from before Mobile. He then intended to proceed to Pensacola and raise the siege in that quarter. There is no doubt that, hadnded, suggested that they should all — of both sides — be sent to Pensacola, where they would alike be properly cared for; and the Admiral, wnder a flag of truce, with or without the Union wounded, to go to Pensacola, with the understanding that the vessel should take out nothing boo much; those who are, seldom do as much as they ought. When in Pensacola, he spent days on the bar, placing the buoys in the best positionepared by 8 o'clock in the evening for removal to the hospital at Pensacola, for which place they left at daylight on the following morning issel some sixty badly wounded officers and men, to be conveyed to Pensacola. He was untiring in his attention, watching and tending them at
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