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Chickasaw (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
effecting a secure lodgment at Eastport; and as I consider the Cumberland now entirely safe, I will be obliged to you if you will have a strong force kept in the Tennessee to keep open navigation on that river. In concluding this telegram, it gives me great pleasure to tender to you, your officers and men, my hearty thanks for your cordial co-operation during the operations of the past thirty days. G. H. Thomas, Major-General. Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding Mississippi Squadron, Chickasaw, Alabama. These were about the last important events in the history of the Mississippi Squadron, as the war was now drawing rapidly to a close. The retreat of Hood left the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers comparatively free from Confederates, and there was little prospect of another invasion of the State while General Thomas remained in command. The vessels of the Mississippi Squadron were scattered along the great river, where the guerillas still carried on their operations on a small sc
Peter Lake (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
nd F. Vanzant; Acting-Gunner, T. H. Green; Acting-Carpenter, Jerome Burns. Judge Torrence--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Jeremiah Irwin; Acting-Ensign, Wm. Sill; Acting-Master's Mate, Chas. White; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. H. Marshall; Engineers: Acting-Chief, P. R. Hartwig; Acting-Second-Assistants, Jasper Holman and E. C. Jones; Acting-Third-Assistant, John Denhart. Argosy. Acting-Master, John C. Morong; Acting-Ensigns, G. T. Hazlett and A. B. Homer; Acting-Master's Mates, Peter Lake and J. A. McCreary; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, R. E. Patterson; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, Thos. Blanchard; Acting-Second-Assistant, Chas. Silvercahn; Acting-Third-Assistant, A. Donnelly. Alexandria--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, D. P. Rosemiller; Acting-Master's Mate, D. M. Stauffer; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, H. C. Shibly; Acting-Second-Assistant, J. S. Willcoxan; Acting-Third-Assistant, J. W. Morton. Marmora--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Thomas Gibson; Acting-E
Bell's Mill, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
Miller, was stationed to assist that portion of the army resting on the river, while the other vessels of Fitch's command were kept in readiness to move wherever they might be required. During the day, Lieutenant-Commander Fitch made constant trips up and down the river in the gun-boat Moose, getting everything in readiness to cooperate with the Army to the best advantage. At 9 P. M., Fitch received intelligence that the enemy's left wing had reached the river and planted batteries at Bell's Mill, four miles below Nashville by land, but, owing to the bends in the river, eighteen miles by water. It was learned that the enemy had captured two steamers, and, although the night was dark and a storm threatening, Fitch determined to recapture or destroy the vessels, so that the Confederates would derive no benefit therefrom. The squadron moved in the following order: Neosho, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Samuel Howard; Carondelet, Acting-Master Charles W. Miller; Fair Play, Acting-Mas
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 58
federate batteries on the Tennessee River. General George H. Thomas compliments the Navy. General Hood's retreat and losses. the Confederate ram Webb. gallantry of Lieutenant-Commander Fitch and his men. end of the Confederate Navy in the Mississippi region. surrender of Confederate property at Shreveport. list of vessels and officers of the Mississippi Squadron, 1865. Acting-rear-admiral. S. P. Lee, who followed Rear-Admiral Porter in October, 1864, in the command of the Mississippi rnment all the property in his possession, consisting of one useless iron-clad and a quantity of naval stores. Twenty-four officers and eighteen men surrendered themselves and were paroled, and that was the last of the Confederate Navy in the Mississippi region. When Lieutenant-Commander W. E. Fitzhugh proceeded to Shreveport to take possession of the Confederate naval property at that place, he was received in a friendly manner, and all seemed anxious that he should secure everything that
Twisty Bayou (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
rapidly to a close. The retreat of Hood left the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers comparatively free from Confederates, and there was little prospect of another invasion of the State while General Thomas remained in command. The vessels of the Mississippi Squadron were scattered along the great river, where the guerillas still carried on their operations on a small scale. Very little occurred that could embellish the pages of history. The Red River region was revisited, the Washita and Black Rivers patrolled, and every precaution taken to guard those inland waters. At this time the Confederate ram Webb succeeded in making her way past all the vessels of the fleet and reached a point twenty-five miles below New Orleans, where she was destroyed, as we have heretofore mentioned. This episode created quite an excitement in the fleet for the time, but it appears that no one was to blame for the Webb getting so far down the river unharmed. The dash of the Webb was the last affair of
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
Many of them had seen, from the time when the Navy obtained possession of the Mississippi and its tributaries, that it would be useless to contend against the power of the North. It is true that the Confederate forces in Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas showed an indomitable spirit in resisting the advance of the Federal armies, yet they received a sufficient number of checks to convince them that the subjugation of the whole country was merely a question of time. It is a fact, which has been little commented on, that at least three hundred and fifty thousand soldiers from the slave States fought on the side of the Union, and, had Texas and Western Louisiana been securely held, there would have been a number of recruits in that quarter obtained for the Federal Army. Mississippi Squadron, January, 1865. Acting Rear-Admiral Samuel P. Lee, Commanding. Staff Lieutenant-Commander C. A. Babcock, Acting-Fleet-Captain; Lieutenant F. J. Naile, Flag-Lieutenant; Acting-Volunt
Clifton, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
this place with his army completely disorganized, except the rear-guard, composed of about five thousand (5,000) men. He destroyed a considerable quantity of ammunition at this place, besides abandoning an ammunition-train of fifteen (15 or twenty (20) wagons about a mile beyond. Your official co-operation on the Tennessee River has contributed largely to the demoralization of Hood's army. Major-General A. J. Smith, commanding detachment of the Army of the Tennessee, will probably reach Clifton by Sunday next, January 1, 1865, where transports are expected to meet him to take his command to Eastport. Please afford him every assistance in your power in effecting a secure lodgment at Eastport; and as I consider the Cumberland now entirely safe, I will be obliged to you if you will have a strong force kept in the Tennessee to keep open navigation on that river. In concluding this telegram, it gives me great pleasure to tender to you, your officers and men, my hearty thanks for yo
Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
to the demoralization of Hood's army. Major-General A. J. Smith, commanding detachment of the Army of the Tennessee, will probably reach Clifton by Sunday next, January 1, 1865, where transports are expected to meet him to take his command to Eastport. Please afford him every assistance in your power in effecting a secure lodgment at Eastport; and as I consider the Cumberland now entirely safe, I will be obliged to you if you will have a strong force kept in the Tennessee to keep open naviEastport; and as I consider the Cumberland now entirely safe, I will be obliged to you if you will have a strong force kept in the Tennessee to keep open navigation on that river. In concluding this telegram, it gives me great pleasure to tender to you, your officers and men, my hearty thanks for your cordial co-operation during the operations of the past thirty days. G. H. Thomas, Major-General. Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding Mississippi Squadron, Chickasaw, Alabama. These were about the last important events in the history of the Mississippi Squadron, as the war was now drawing rapidly to a close. The retreat of Hood left the Tennessee a
J. W. Miles (search for this): chapter 58
d W. H. Haven; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, T. F. Leech; Acting-Assistant-Paymaster, C. W. Bull; Engineers: Acting Third-Assistants, J. A. Goodwin, David Pace and John W. Ross. General Thomas--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Gilbert Morton; Acting-Ensign, Richard McCallister; Acting-Master's Mates, Joseph Grenlick, A. C. Orcutt, L. D. Simonds and Hans Trulsen; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, G. W. Burrows; Acting-Second-Assistant, W. E. Cowle; Acting-Third-Assistants, Jackson Andrew and J. W. Miles. Romeo--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Thomas Baldwin; Acting-Ensigns, R. P. Shaw and J. E. Ernst; Acting-Master's Mates, John Winram and W. J. Franks: Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. R. Moffatt; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, J. N. McCurdy; Acting-Second-Assistant, W. E. Taylor; Acting-Third-Assistant, Wm. Teal. Rattler--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, N. B. Willetts; Acting-Ensigns, H. N. Wells, S. H. Strunk and H. E. Church; Acting-Master's Mate, John Cronin and W. N. Bock; Act
C. H. Burt (search for this): chapter 58
-Master, C. R. Knowles; Acting Ensigns, Wm. R. Cooper And C. C. Cushing. Essex--Fourth-rate. Commander, Andrew Bryson; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, J. C. Parker; Acting-Ensigns, Spencer Johnson, E. M. Wood and J. H. Barry; Acting-Master's Mates, J. A. Whitesides and R. D. Punch; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Thomas Allan; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Chas. W. Slamm; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Joseph K. Heap; Acting-First-Assistant, J. L. Hilliard: Acting-Second-Assistants, E. P. Sprague and C. H. Burt; Acting-Third-Assistant, Nicholas Sauer; Gunner, Charles Earnshaw; Acting-Carpenter, Geo. H. Stevens. Benton--Fourth-rate. Lieutenant-Commander, E. Y. McCauley; Acting-Master, W. J. Lees; Acting-Ensigns, P. H. Randolph and P. Frazer, Jr.; Acting-Master's Mates, William Kisnei, Hiram Simonton, A. T. Bisel, R. L. Evans and Henry Clifton; Assistant Surgeon, C. J. S. Wells; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, C. J. Lowndes; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Joseph V. Starr; Acting-First-Assistants, H. W.
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