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Brentwood, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
with these convictions, I ordered the Army to move forward on the 1st of December in the direction of Nashville; Lee's Corps marched in advance, followed by Stewart's and Cheatham's Corps, and the troops bivouacked that night in the vicinity of Brentwood. On the morning of the 2d, the march was resumed, and line of battle formed in front of Nashville. Lee's Corps was placed in the centre and across the Franklin pike; Stewart occupied the left, and Cheatham the right — their flanks extending aountry, implored them to re-form and face the enemy. Her name deserves to be enrolled among the heroes of the war, and it is with pride that I bear testimony to her bravery and patriotism. Order among the troops was in a measure restored at Brentwood, a few miles in rear of the scene of disaster, through the promptness and gallantry of Clayton's Division, which speedily formed and confronted the enemy, with Gibson's brigade and McKenzie's battery, of Fenner's battalion, acting as rear guard
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ssions to our ranks in Tennessee. The following letter from Governor Isham G. Harris, written during the retreat and at the time the Army was approaching the Tennessee river, will indicate to what extent our ranks would have been recruited, had the campaign proved successful: Tuscumbia, Alabama, December 25th, 1864. his Excellency, Jefferson Davis. Sir:--I arrived here last night, leaving the Army some fifteen miles beyond the Tennessee river, on the Bainbridge route. Our stay in Tennessee was so short, and engagements so constant and pressing that we did not recruit to any considerable extent. If we could have remained there a few weeks longer Major General Carter L. Stevenson then assumed command of Lee's Corps, and ably discharged his duties during the continuance of the retreat to and across the Tennessee river. Major General Walthall, one of the most able division commanders in the South, was here ordered to form a rear guard with eight picked brigades together w
Natchez (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
Chapter 17: Tennessee campaign Franklin Nashville retreat Tupelo return to Richmond surrender at Natchez, Mississippi. At early dawn the troops were put in motion in the direction of Franklin, marching as rapidly as possible to over-take the enemy before he crossed the Big Harpeth, eighteen miles from Sprinceived the painful intelligence of Lee's surrender. Nevertheless, I continued my journey, and about the last of April reached the Mississippi, in the vicinity of Natchez. Here I remained with my staff and escort, using vain endeavors to cross this mighty river, until after the receipt of positive information of General E. Kirby Srender. During this interim we were several times hotly chased by Federal cavalry through the wood and canebrake. Finally, on the 31st of May, 1865, I rode into Natchez and proffered my sword to Major General Davidson, of the United States Army. He courteously bade me retain it, paroled the officers and men in company with me, a
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
e breastworks to the other by men reaching over hurriedly and seizing their enemy by the hair or the collar. Just before dark Johnston's Division, of Lee's Corps, moved gallantly to the support of Cheatham; although it made a desperate charge and succeeded in capturing three stands of colors, it did not effect a permanent breach in the line of the enemy. The two remaining divisions could not unfortunately become engaged owing to the obscurity of night. In an address delivered at Charleston, S. C., I estimated our strength, at Franklin, at twenty-eight thousand (28,000), having overlooked the fact that two of Lee's Divisions could not become engaged. The struggle continued with more or less violence until 9 p. m., when followed skirmishing and much desultory firing until about 3 a. m. the ensuing morning. The enemy then withdrew, leaving his dead and wounded upon the field. Thus terminated one of the fiercest conflicts of the war. Nightfall which closed in upon us so soon a
Tupelo (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ssee campaign Franklin Nashville retreat Tupelo return to Richmond surrender at Natchez, Misy, the march was continued in the direction of Tupelo, at which place Cheatham's Corps, the last in e Secretary of War: headquarters, Tupelo, Mississippi, January 13th, 1865. Honorable J. A. Seicate: [no. 542.]>headquarters, Tupelo, Mississippi, January 16th, 1865. Lieutenant Generalg made upon the 23d of January, the day I left Tupelo for Richmond. The following letter from Colonome men furloughed under an order published at Tupelo, and some small organizations also furloughed estion but that the Army, after its arrival at Tupelo, numbered from eighteen thousand (18,000) to nne thousand out of fourteen thousand, who left Tupelo to repair to his standard in North Carolina, d, inclusive of the cavalry. Thus we find at Tupelo eighteen thousand five hundred (18,500) infantith zeal and strict fidelity. After leaving Tupelo, I returned to Virginia and found President Da[7 more...]
Florence, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
thousand four hundred and five (2405); cavalry, two thousand three hundred and six (2306); total, twenty-three thousand and fifty-three (23,053). This last number, subtracted from thirty thousand six hundred (30,600), the strength of the Army at Florence, shows a total loss from all causes of seven thousand five hundred and forty-seven (7547), from the 6th of November to the 10th of December, which period includes the engagements at Columbia, Franklin, and of Forrest's cavalry. The enemy's esout of fourteen thousand, who left Tupelo to repair to his standard in North Carolina, deserted, and either went to the woods or to their homes. This affords positive proof that General Beauregard and I judged aright at Gadsden and also at Florence, Alabama, in regard to the Army, when we decided that to turn and follow Sherman would cause such numbers to desert, as to render those who were too proud to quit their colors almost useless. In accordance with Colonel Mason's letter of March the
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
absence of the prestige of complete victory, I could not venture with my small force to cross the Cumberland river into Kentucky, without first receiving reinforcements from the Trans-Mississippi Department. I felt convinced that the Tennesseans anaphed the War Department to request that General Breckinridge's command, in West Virginia, be sent to me or ordered into Kentucky to create a diversion and lessen the concentration of the Federal Army in my front. General R. E. Lee's necessities wer, it will nevertheless be of interest to note how deeply concerned General Grant became for fear we should finally reach Kentucky. He ordered General Thomas to attack on the 6th of December, and evidently became much worried about our presence in frto-day, I shall go no further. * * * U. S. Grant, Lieutenant General. He could not well afford to allow us to reach Kentucky, and finally assail him in rear at Petersburg. Therefore he left his own Army in front of the illustrious Lee to procee
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 17
General Grant became for fear we should finally reach Kentucky. He ordered General Thomas to attack on the 6th of December, and evidently became much worried about our presence in front of Nashville, as he telegraphed to the War Department at Washington, on the 9th, to relieve Thomas on account of his delay in assaulting according to instructions. This order was issued on that date, but was afterwards suspended by Grant. On the 11th, at 4 p. m., he again telegraphed General Thomas. Van Hoto act, accepting such weather as you find. * * * * The following dispatch from General Grant to Thomas gives strong evidence that in this campaign we had thrust at the vitals of the enemy: Van Horne's History, vol. II, page 259. Washington, December 15th, 1864, 11.30 p. m. I was just on my way to Nashville, but receiving a dispatch from Van Duzen, detailing your splendid success of to-day, I shall go no further. * * * U. S. Grant, Lieutenant General. He could not well aff
Duck River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
issippi. At early dawn the troops were put in motion in the direction of Franklin, marching as rapidly as possible to over-take the enemy before he crossed the Big Harpeth, eighteen miles from Spring Hill. Lieutenant General Lee had crossed Duck river after dark the night previous, and, in order to reach Franklin, was obliged to march a distance of thirty miles. The head of his column arrived at Spring Hill at 9 a. m. on the 30th, and, after a short rest, followed in the wake of the main bodguard with eight picked brigades together with Forrest's cavalry; the march was then resumed in the direction of Columbia, Stewart's Corps moving in front, followed by those of Cheatham and Stevenson. The Army bivouacked in line of battle near Duck river, on the night of the 18th. The following day, we crossed the river and proceeded on different roads leading towards Bainbridge on the Tennessee. I entertained but little concern in regard to being further harassed by the enemy. I felt conf
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
epartment to request that General Breckinridge's command, in West Virginia, be sent to me or ordered into Kentucky to create a diversion and lessen the concentration of the Federal Army in my front. General R. E. Lee's necessities were, however, more urgent than my own. The application was, therefore, not granted. On the 7th, intelligence was received, and telegraphed to General Beauregard, that General Steele, with fifteen thousand (15,000) troops, had passed Memphis in the direction of Cairo; also, that Rousseau had made a sally, and driven back our forces at Murfreesboroa. The following day General Forrest was instructed to leave the roads open to Lebanon, in the hope of enticing Rousseau out of his stronghold; preparations were at the same time made to capture his detachment of eight thousand, should he venture to reinforce Thomas at Nashville. He remained, however, behind his entrenchments. General Bates's Division was ordered to return to the Army; Forrest was instructe
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